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National Portrait Gallery

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in TORCH, October 1978

From the southeast, an evening view of the exterior of the National Portrait Gallery's side of the American Art and Portrait Galleries' building.

2013 Highlights - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
A recap of 2013 at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. ---- Music: "Like Swimming" by Broke for Free: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Broke_For_Free/Leaf/Broke_For_Free_-_Leaf_-_02_Like_Swimming "The Great" by Broke for Free http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Broke_For_Free/Slam_Funk/Broke_For_Free_-_Slam_Funk_-_03_The_Great https://soundcloud.com/broke-for-free Used via Creative Commons, Attribution 3.0 Unported: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

National Portrait Gallery

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery homepage.

Norman Mineta Portrait Presentation - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Former Transportation and Commerce Secretary Norman Y. Mineta was recognized by the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program with the installation of his portrait in a private ceremony at the Portrait Gallery on Monday, July 26. The portrait, by artist Everett Raymond Kinstler, is on display on the museum's first floor, in the "New Arrivals" exhibition, a collection of recent acquisitions. The oil-on-canvas painting was offered as a gift to the Portrait Gallery from the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program. Born in 1931 to immigrant Japanese parents in San José, California, Mineta and his family were detained along with 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent at an internment camp during World War II. Mineta's career in politics began with an appointment to a vacant seat on the San José City Council in 1967; two years later he won the seat in his own right. In 1971, he was elected mayor of San José, becoming the first Asian American mayor of a major U.S. city. As a member of Congress from 1975 through 1995, Mineta co-founded the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus and engineered the passage of H.R. 442, the Civil Liberties Act of 1988—an official government apology for the internment of those of Japanese ancestry during World War II. In 2000, President Bill Clinton appointed Mineta secretary of commerce, making him the first Asian Pacific American to hold a cabinet post. In 2001, President George W. Bush appointed him secretary of transportation, making him the only Democrat in Bush's cabinet and one of the few citizens ever to serve in the cabinet of both a Democratic and Republican president. During the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, Mineta issued the historic order to ground all civilian aircraft, the first time this had been done in U.S. history. Mineta retired from his cabinet post in 2006 and in that same year was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award. Mineta also served on the Smithsonian's Board of Regents from 1979 through 1995 and supported the establishment of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American program in 1997. Currently, he is vice chairman of Hill & Knowlton, a leading global communications consultancy. This commission was made possible through the support of benefactors George and Sakaye Aratani, Hill & Knowlton, and Verizon Communications with additional support from many others. The portrait of Mineta is a part of the National Portrait Gallery's ongoing efforts to commission portraits of living sitters for its permanent collection.

Portraits: Katharine Hepburn - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Amy Historian, Historian at the National Portrait Gallery talks about Katharine Hepburn and her Oscars, which are on view in the Portrait Gallery's "Contemporary Americans" gallery. . Recorded at NPG, March 18. 2014.

Portraits: Walt Whitman - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Walt Whitman's experiences in Washington are at the very core of his poetry and his journals. After his brother George was wounded at Fredericksburg in December of 1862, Walt Whitman came south from Manhattan and began work as a volunteer. He spent time with soldiers recovering in the Patent Office Building (now home to the National Portrait Gallery and Smithsonian American Art Museum), which had been converted into a hospital for much of the Civil War. In this video, Warren Perry, researcher and playwright at the National Portrait Gallery, reads Walt Whitman. Perry's play "Swift to My Wounded: Walt Whitman and the Civil War" was recently published by the National Portrait Gallery. It is available through the museum shop: http://www.npg.si.edu/shop/shopcafe.html

Portraits: Katherine Hepburn - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Historian Amy Henderson discusses Katherine Hepburn's Oscars and portrait by Everett Raymond Kinstler. In 2009, the National Portrait Gallery acquired Hepburns four Oscar statuettes as a gift from the Katharine Hepburn estate. They are now on view in the Twentieth-Century Americans gallery on the museums third floor, next to a 1982 portrait of Hepburn by artist Everett Raymond Kinstler, which she termed her favorite. Hepburn won Best Actress Academy Awards for "Morning Glory," 1933; "Guess Whos Coming to Dinner," 1967; "The Lion in Winter," 1968; and "On Golden Pond, 1981." Learn more about Hepburn by visiting the online exhibition for "KATE: A Centennial Celebration. ( http://npg.si.edu/exhibit/hepburn ) This exhibition was on view at the National Portrait Gallery from November 2, 2007, to September 28, 2008.

Portraits: Lucretia Mott, Daguerreotype Portrait - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Ann Shumard, Senior Curator of Photography at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, discusses an 1851 daguerreotype portrait of Lucretia Coffin Mott. Lucretia Mott's commitment to ending slavery and securing rights for women became the defining features of her life. A devout Quaker whose activism proved unsettling to some members of her faith, Mott assumed a highly visible role in the abolitionist movement. After joining William Lloyd Garrison at the launch of the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1833, she helped to found Philadelphia's Female Anti-Slavery Society. Her concern for women's rights was a natural outgrowth of her abolitionist efforts, and in 1848. Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton organized the convention at Seneca Falls, New York, that gave birth to the women's suffrage movement.

Portraits After 5 (09.02.11) - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
A recap of the September 2, 2011 "Portraits After 5" after hours event at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. The evening featured DJ Natty Boom, hip hop dance troupe Culture Shock DC, and performance artist Chajana denHarder presenting her piece "Home." Visitors also enjoyed a special after hours viewing of the exhibition "Capital Portraits: Treasures Washington Private Collections." This video features the track "90s Hip hop" by droppinbombz (on yourbeats.com at http://yourbeats.com/sound107.html), available under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License.

"Portraits Alive!" 2015 - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
The Portraits Alive! program is a dynamic combination of history, visual art, and performance art. Local teens lead a theatrical tour that brings the Portrait Gallery's collection to life through original, student-written performances. This program has been made possible through the generous support of the Honorable Richard Blumenthal and Mrs. Cynthia M. Blumenthal, Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation, and the Reinsch Family Education Endowment. Video Produced by Brittany Jordan Cole, New Media Intern Music: "Feel Good (Instrumental)" by Broke for Free: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Broke_For_Free/ Used under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) License.

Living Self-Portrait: Katharine Graham - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Former head of the Washington Post Katharine Graham discusses her young life, education, family, marriage and the Post's involvement with the Pentagon Papers and Watergate.

2017 American Portrait Gala Highlights - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
On Sunday, November 19, 2017 the National Portrait Gallery held the American Portrait Gala, recognizing the accomplishments of notable contemporary Americans whose portraits reside in the National Portrait Gallery collection. The honorees were: MADELEINE K. ALBRIGHT Former Secretary of State Prize Presented by Robert Redford DAVID D. HO, M.D. Medical Doctor and HIV/AIDS Researcher Prize Presented by Gerald H. Friedland, M.D. BILL T. JONES Artistic Director, Choreographer, and Dancer Prize Presented by Glenn Ligon SPIKE LEE Film Director, Producer, Writer, and Actor Prize Presented by Patrick Ewing RITA MORENO Multi Award Winning Actress Prize Presented by Andrea Mitchell The evening culminated with a special performance by four-time GRAMMY award-winning artist Esperanza Spalding. More at: http://npg.si.edu/gala

Ivory at the National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Oval painting of Abraham Lincoln looking at the viewer

Living Self-Portrait: Al Hirschfeld - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
This highlight comes from an interview of Al Hirschfeld on June 28, 1996, recorded as part of the National Portrait Gallery’s Living Self-Portrait Series. He was interviewed by then Senior Historian Marc Pachter. In this clip, Hirschfeld talks about the origin of including the name of his daughter “Nina” in his artwork and remarks on the public response that came along with it. The full interview is available for research by appointment within the Audio/Visual Archive. To see more of Hirschfeld’s work as well as portraits of the artist, please visit our collection at http://npg.si.edu/portraits

Portrait in Minute: Dolores Huerta - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Taína Caragol, curator of Latino art and history at the National Portrait Gallery discusses Dolores Huerta. The exhibition "One Life: Dolores Huerta" (July 3, 2015 through May 15, 2016 ) highlights the significant role of this Latina leader in the California farm workers movement of the 1960s and 70s. This eleventh installment in the "One Life" series is the first devoted to a Latina. It illuminates Huerta as the co-founder, with Cesar Chavez, of the United Farm Workers (UFW), and highlights her position as the union's lobbyist and contract negotiator. Huerta was instrumental in achieving major legal protections and a better standard of living for farm workers, yet she remains largely under-acknowledged in history. The exhibition is the first in a national museum to draw attention to her contributions. Opening in July 2015, the exhibition will coincide with the 50th anniversary of the September 1965 grape strike launched by the farm workers movement.

Living Self-Portrait: Dolores Huerta - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
"Living Self-Portrait" interview with Dolores Huerta. She was interviewed by Taína Caragol, curator of Latino art and history at the National Portrait Gallery on September 24, 2015. Through her example as a labor and civil rights leader, and her challenge to norms that restrict women’s role in society, Dolores Huerta became an early symbol of female power for the Chicano and feminist movements.

Living Self-Portrait: Vernon Jordan - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
On April 9, 2012, Vernon Jordan was interviewed at a public event at the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. Jordan was interviewed by Marc Pachter, former NPG director. Vernon Jordan played an important role in the civil rights movement, heading the United Negro College Fund in the 1960s and serving as president of the National Urban League from 1972 to 1981.

Tommy Lasorda Portrait Dedication Ceremony - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery installed a portrait of Tommy Lasorda, Hall of Fame manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers Tuesday, Sept. 22. Painted by artist Everett Raymond Kinstler, the life-sized portrait measures 60 by 50 inches and was commissioned to commemorate Lasordas legacy as part of the Dodgers organization. Sept. 22 was Lasordas 82nd birthday and the first night of a three-game series between the Dodgers and the Washington Nationals in Washington, D.C. The portrait is on view in the museums exhibition New Arrivals on the first floor through Nov. 15, 2009. After a brief Major League career as a left-handed pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Lasorda became one of the most enthusiastic and successful managers in baseball history. In his 20-year career as the Dodgers manager, Lasorda led the team to eight division titles and two World Championships. After his retirement, he became a Dodgers executive, and this year marks his 60th season with the Dodger organization and his fifth year as special advisor to the chairman. Lasorda was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1997, and he managed the U.S. team to its first-ever baseball gold medal at the 2000 Sydney Olympics. Kinstler has painted more than 1,200 portraits of well-known personalities and public figures. The Portrait Gallerys collection includes paintings and sketches of Katharine Hepburn, Tony Bennett, Richard Nixon, Norman Rockwell and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Lasorda sat for the portrait at Kinstlers National Arts Club studio in New York City in June 2009. The portrait is a gift from friends of Lasorda. For more on Tommy Lasordas portrait, see the National Portrait Gallerys blog at: http://face2face.si.edu/my_weblog/2009/09/tommy-lasorda-joins-the-collection-of-the-national-portrait-gallery-.html Image info: Thomas Charles Lasorda / Everett Raymond Kinstler / Oil on canvas / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

Fall 2016 Highlights - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
A recap of 2016, so far, at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery tells the history of America through individuals who have shaped its culture. Through the visual arts, performing arts and new media, the Portrait Gallery portrays poets and presidents, visionaries and villains, actors and activists whose lives tell the American story.

Spring 2017 Highlights - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
A recap of 2016, so far, at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery tells the history of America through individuals who have shaped its culture. Through the visual arts, performing arts and new media, the Portrait Gallery portrays poets and presidents, visionaries and villains, actors and activists whose lives tell the American story.

Fall 2017 Highlights - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
A recap of 2017, so far, at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery tells the history of America through individuals who have shaped its culture. Through the visual arts, performing arts and new media, the Portrait Gallery portrays poets and presidents, visionaries and villains, actors and activists whose lives tell the American story.

Spring 2016 Highlights - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
A recap of 2016, so far, at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery tells the history of America through individuals who have shaped its culture. Through the visual arts, performing arts and new media, the Portrait Gallery portrays poets and presidents, visionaries and villains, actors and activists whose lives tell the American story.

Summer/Fall 2015 Highlights - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
A recap of 2015, so far, at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery tells the history of America through individuals who have shaped its culture. Through the visual arts, performing arts and new media, the Portrait Gallery portrays poets and presidents, visionaries and villains, actors and activists whose lives tell the American story.
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