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Gifford Beal painting a mural

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 18 x 23 cm.

Gifford Beal painting a mural at Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.

Oral history interview with José and Malaquias Montoya, 1988 Feb. 28-June 2

Archives of American Art
Sound recording, master: 7 sound cassettes (ca. 11 hrs.) analog.

Sound recording, duplicate: 7 cassettes

Transcript: 373 p.

Interviews of brothers José and Malaquias Montoya conducted 1988 Feb. 28-June 2, by Eduardo Hernandez, for the Archives of American Art.

The Montoya's recall growing up as Mexican-Americans in a rural town in Colorado; moving to urban areas in California; their early education and development of their political awareness; and their artistic experiences, including their founding of the Royal Chicano Air Force, a group working primarily as muralists.

Arthur Sinclair Covey painting mural for Kohler Company

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 26 x 21 cm.

Identification on verso (handwritten): Arthur Covey working on Kohler Co. mural

Oral history interview with Michael Spafford and Elizabeth Sandvig, 1992 September 2-4

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 99 pages.

An interview of Michael Spafford and Elizabeth Sandvig conducted 1992 September 2-4, by Paul Karlstrom, at their home in Seattle, Washington, for the Archives of American Art. Spafford and Sandvig discuss their marriage and their separate careers, and the controversy and trial resulting from Spafford's "Labors of Hercules" murals at the Washington State Capital Assembly Chamber in Olympia.

Oral history interview with William Walker, 1991 June 12-14

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 111 pages

An interview of William Walker conducted 1991 June 12-14, by Victor Sorell, for the Archives of American Art.

Walker discusses his childhood in Birmingham, Alabama and Chicago, Illinois; painting murals in Memphis; the Chicago Mural Group, the Wall of Respect in Chicago, the Wall of Dignity in Detroit and other murals; subject matter and use of black historical figures such as Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, and Elijah Muhammad; use of narrative; public response to the murals; and artists he worked with including Eugene Edaw, Mark Rogovin, John Weber and Mitchell Caton.

Olive Rush preliminary mural design

Archives of American Art
Sketch : 1 sheet : various media ; 22 x 26 cm. Handwritten above image: Jungle - tentative sketch for sidewall; Mrs. Linn's dressing room; at Lake Bluff. For painting in oil - on silver ground.
Date from heading on folder in which item is housed.

Mural in Adams Morgan

Anacostia Community Museum Archives
Photographic image of a mural hanging on the end property at 1824 Columbia Road Northwest in the Adams Morgan neighborhood of Washington, D.C. taken on May 4, 1994.

The mural features imagery of the Statue of Liberty, the Capitol and images of nature juxtaposed with images of the city. Behind the painting, there is a ghost sign featuring a faded hand painted white sign that says "Menchini's Califlorida Fruit Shop". This building has historically housed Latin stores. In 1964, Hierberto Gonzalez opened the first Americana Grocery, a regional Latin grocery store in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. This building later housed Image Hair Salon, a Dominican hair salon. Adams Morgan is a part of Ward 1, located in Northwest Washington, D.C. According to 1990 census data, Ward 1 had a population that was 18% Latino and 60% Black Non-Hispanic. This is the highest percentage of Latinos in Washington, D.C. and one of the most diverse wards in Washington, D.C. at the time.

Oral history interview with Judith Baca, 1986 August 5-6

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 59 pages

An interview of Judith Baca conducted 1986 August 5-6, by Amalia Mesa-Bains, for the Archives of American Art.

Baca speaks of her family history, childhood, and education in Los Angeles, her involvement with the Los Angeles muralism movement in the early 1970s, her teaching experience at East Los Angeles recreation center, her directorship of the Eastside murals and of the City-Wide Mural Project, the work of other muralists, feminist views on art which have influenced her work, the origin of the Social and Public Arts Resource Center in Venice, California, her directorship and the mission of the S.P.A.R.C. in 1986, and her own current mural projects.

Leon Kroll painting a mural in the Worcester Memorial Auditorium

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 25 x 19 cm. Leon Kroll, standing on a scaffold, working on a mural, which memorializes servicemen, at the Worcester Memorial Auditorium.

Identification on verso (handwritten): Leon Kroll at work on Worcester mural, photographed by Homer St. Gaudens.

Mural Decoration for the Sulgrave Hotel [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
International Studio, December 1925, pg. 174.

New York Times, February 8, 1925, pg. SM16.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Mural Decoration for the Sulgrave Hotel [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
International Studio, December 1925, pg. 174.

New York Times, February 8, 1925, pg. SM16.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Oral history interview with Reuben Kadish, 1992 Apr. 15

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 1 sound cassette.

Transcript: 40 p.

An interview of Reuben Kadish conducted 1992 Apr. 15, by Stephen Polcari, for the Archives of American Art. Kadish discusses designing murals for the WPA in the 1930s; working as an artist in the South Pacific for the U.S. Army during World War II; the N.Y. art scene in the 1940s; and his views on government support of the arts and on art censorship. He recalls Jackson Pollock.

Oral history interview with Merlin F. Pollock, 1979 July 30 and 1980 July 30

Archives of American Art
5 sound files : digital, wav file

Transcript: 65 pages

An interview with Merlin F. Pollock conducted 1979 July 30 and 1980 July 30, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art. Pollock speaks of his training at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Fontainebleau, France; his work as instructor of mural painting at the Art Institute of Chicago, 1935-1943; his paintings of Alaska commissioned by the government in 1937 and his work as supervisor of mural painting for the Illinois WPA, 1940-1943. He also discusses Chicago artists and his own murals for the government.

Oral history interview with John Spencer, 1994 September 1

Archives of American Art
2 sound cassettes (1 hr., 23 min.): analog.

Transcript: 41 pages.

An interview with John Spencer conducted 1994 September 1, by Paul J. Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.

Spencer discusses his work assisting Dean Cornwell on the Los Angeles Central Library murals between 1927-1933; his subsequent relationship with Cornwell; and his experience as a young artist in Southern California in the 1930s.

Mural Paintings from the Caves of India, Exhibition

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The old negative number is 36705-F.

View of two gallery alcoves at the National Collection of Fine Arts in the Natural History Building exhibiting mural paintings from the caves of India by Sarkis Katchadourian. The exhibit ran from June 2 to June 25,1944.

Mural paintings on traditional dwelling. Qurna, Egypt, [negative]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.

"Due to a shared cultural background, common social and economic conditions and inherited building materials and techniques, slight variations distinguish the character of the majority of villages in the various regions of Egypt (Nubian villages in the south are an exception). The main vernacular types of building found in rural areas are houses of prayer, cemeteries and dwellings. The dwelling -a cluster of which forms the community- generally does not exceed two storeys. It serves as a home, a store and a stable. Elaborate decorations and even paintings can sometimes be found on specific house walls, although in some instances these are temporary, as in murals in Egypt which celebrate -and announce- the return of an individual from the pilgrimage to the 'Holy Kaba' in Mecca." [Oliver P., 1998: Encyclopedia of Vernacular Architecture of the World. Mediterranean and Southwest Asia. North Africa and Maghreb. Cambridge University Press]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Institute of Architects, directing the Egyptian portion of the documentary on Ancient Egypt, March 1965 and September 1965.

Mural paintings on traditional dwelling. Qurna, Egypt, [negative]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.

"Due to a shared cultural background, common social and economic conditions and inherited building materials and techniques, slight variations distinguish the character of the majority of villages in the various regions of Egypt (Nubian villages in the south are an exception). The main vernacular types of building found in rural areas are houses of prayer, cemeteries and dwellings. The dwelling -a cluster of which forms the community- generally does not exceed two storeys. It serves as a home, a store and a stable. Elaborate decorations and even paintings can sometimes be found on specific house walls, although in some instances these are temporary, as in murals in Egypt which celebrate -and announce- the return of an individual from the pilgrimage to the 'Holy Kaba' in Mecca." [Oliver P., 1998: Encyclopedia of Vernacular Architecture of the World. Mediterranean and Southwest Asia. North Africa and Maghreb. Cambridge University Press]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Institute of Architects, directing the Egyptian portion of the documentary on Ancient Egypt, March 1965 and September 1965.

Mural Decoration, Dome of the Manufactures and Liberal Arts Building, World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Mural decoration of dome with theme of Communication. In the center, Ariel holds a burst of lightning. At the corners are four figures symbolizing the Telephone, Telegraphy, Electricity, and Solar Power.

Mural Decoration, Dome of the Manufactures and Liberal Arts Building, World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
In the center, a spider's web. At the four corners, standing allegorical figures representing Abundance. At four sides, tablets inscribed: ABUNDANCE, OF LAND, AND SEA, 1892.

Head (Mural Study, U.S. Department of Justice)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Design for a Painted Wall Decoration

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
The upper part of design cut out along the outlines, painted on top. Children seated upon the floor and the balustrade of a platform and kneeling upon it playing musical instruments, while other children listen. Winged women stand laterally, their outside wings raised and sheltering cherubim. The platform stands, apparently, before a painted window.

Mural paintings on traditional dwelling. Al Uqsur, Egypt, [negative]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.

"Due to a shared cultural background, common social and economic conditions and inherited building materials and techniques, slight variations distinguish the character of the majority of villages in the various regions of Egypt (Nubian villages in the south are an exception). The main vernacular types of building found in rural areas are houses of prayer, cemeteries and dwellings. The dwelling -a cluster of which forms the community- generally does not exceed two storeys. It serves as a home, a store and a stable. Elaborate decorations and even paintings can sometimes be found on specific house walls, although in some instances these are temporary, as in murals in Egypt which celebrate -and announce- the return of an individual from the pilgrimage to the 'Holy Kaba' in Mecca." [Oliver P., 1998: Encyclopedia of Vernacular Architecture of the World. Mediterranean and Southwest Asia. North Africa and Maghreb. Cambridge University Press]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Institute of Architects, directing the Egyptian portion of the documentary on Ancient Egypt, March 1965 and September 1965.

Mural paintings on traditional dwelling. Al Uqsur, Egypt, [negative]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.

"Due to a shared cultural background, common social and economic conditions and inherited building materials and techniques, slight variations distinguish the character of the majority of villages in the various regions of Egypt (Nubian villages in the south are an exception). The main vernacular types of building found in rural areas are houses of prayer, cemeteries and dwellings. The dwelling -a cluster of which forms the community- generally does not exceed two storeys. It serves as a home, a store and a stable. Elaborate decorations and even paintings can sometimes be found on specific house walls, although in some instances these are temporary, as in murals in Egypt which celebrate -and announce- the return of an individual from the pilgrimage to the 'Holy Kaba' in Mecca." [Oliver P., 1998: Encyclopedia of Vernacular Architecture of the World. Mediterranean and Southwest Asia. North Africa and Maghreb. Cambridge University Press]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Institute of Architects, directing the Egyptian portion of the documentary on Ancient Egypt, March 1965 and September 1965.

Mural paintings on traditional dwelling. Al Uqsur, Egypt, [negative]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.

"Due to a shared cultural background, common social and economic conditions and inherited building materials and techniques, slight variations distinguish the character of the majority of villages in the various regions of Egypt (Nubian villages in the south are an exception). The main vernacular types of building found in rural areas are houses of prayer, cemeteries and dwellings. The dwelling -a cluster of which forms the community- generally does not exceed two storeys. It serves as a home, a store and a stable. Elaborate decorations and even paintings can sometimes be found on specific house walls, although in some instances these are temporary, as in murals in Egypt which celebrate -and announce- the return of an individual from the pilgrimage to the 'Holy Kaba' in Mecca." [Oliver P., 1998: Encyclopedia of Vernacular Architecture of the World. Mediterranean and Southwest Asia. North Africa and Maghreb. Cambridge University Press]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Institute of Architects, directing the Egyptian portion of the documentary on Ancient Egypt, March 1965 and September 1965.
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