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Father John's Medicine

National Museum of American History
The indications or uses for this product as provided by the manufacturer are: A nutritive tonic and a wholesome medicine. Recommended for relief of coughs due to colds and throat irritation resulting from colds by its soothing effect on the throat.

Mentos Medicine

National Museum of American History

Lydia E. Pinkham's Herb Medicine

National Museum of American History
The indications or uses for this product as provided on its packaging:

A purely vegetable alterative tonic

Lydia E. Pinkham's Herb Medicine

National Museum of American History
Recommended as an alterative tonic in conditions for which this preparation is adapted. Directions are to take one tablespoon three times per day, one half hour before meals. Shake bottle before using. Caution: This preparation includes small amounts of ingredients to which some persons are susceptible or allergic, and in rare instances temporary ringing of the ears, a skin rash, or visual disturbances may occur. Under such circumstances discontinue use until the symptoms disappear, then begin again with one-half the usual dosage. If the above symptoms recur, discontinue use.

Father John's Medicine

National Museum of American History
The indications or uses for this product as provided by the manufacturer are:

A food medicine. A nutritive tonic.

Medicine Chest

National Museum of American History
This small wooden drug chest has a hinged lid with a bale handle and two hinged side compartments. The exterior of the chest is embellished with metal straps, hinges, and incised stylized flowers. Inside are four drawers with stamped pewter knobs and three compartments for bottles. The chest and drawers are lined with marbled paper. All of the bottles are blown and molded glass. Five of the bottles have pewter caps, and two have glass stoppers. The four pewter containers have pewter caps. One drawer is filled with a white powder. By the 18th century medicine chest of this type had become more or less standardized and available to the general population. They were used in the home as well as for travel over land and on the water. The Deutsche Apotheken Museum has a similar but slightly larger medicine chest in their collection which is illustrated in Das Deutsche Apotheken Museum, figure 256.

Freligh's Liver Medicine

National Museum of American History
[No indications or uses for this product are provided on its packaging.]

Medicine Chest

National Museum of American History
Domestic medicine chests were popular with nobility in the 18th century, although not all were as large or elaborate as this object. Besides holding and keeping expensive medicines safe, chests like this one were used for storing jewelry and other valuables. Many medicine chests commissioned by nobility were one of a kind creations, made from rare woods and precious metals. Interior lids were sometimes painted with pastoral scenes or iconic imagery.This chest is said to have belonged to Madame la Cometesse Giech whose family lived and ruled Thurnau, Bavaria, from 1695 to 1796.

This large wooden medicine chest has a metal hinged lid and a drawer at the front of the cabinet. (The door is no longer attached to the cabinet) The interior lid has a shallow compartment secured to the door with a hook. Wrought-iron straps, brackets, hinges, escutcheons, and pulls support the chest and add a decorative element. The lid opens to reveal the chest's largest compartment, which is partitioned into fifty smaller sections that hold medicine bottles. The smaller drawers below the main compartment have round wrought-iron or turned wooden knobs. Each compartment and the drawers are lined with red, blue, blue green, orange, and ivory marbled paper.

Eighteen drawers contain glass bottles of various shapes, sizes, and colors. In addition there are bone fragments, minerals, round ointment containers, pill boxes, a nutmeg grater, a funnel, a brass scale, a round wooden bead, and handwritten notes. The bottles in the main compartment are free-blown and made of clear or green glass. Some of the bottles have pewter lids. Other bottles are wrapped in marbled paper and secured with string. A few of the bottles have handwritten prescriptions in German that are attached with string at their necks. Most labels are illegible, and glued to the bottles or the lids. Other drawers contain various odds and ends, including three stones: two bright blue and one a white crystal; three small round ointment containers, two pewter, one ivory; one scale and one balance, and three animal jaw bones with very sharp pointed teeth.

Oval wooden pill boxes are covered and lined with the same decorative marbled paper as the drawers, several of which have wax seals. Many of the lids have written inscriptions. Some of the boxes contain residual powders or pills. One folded packet of paper contains a yellow green powder. Preserved in a plastic bag are several pieces of paper, one marked in black ink, “Beib silien Babe. 1724” A faded envelope is marked in ink, “Madame ...la comtesse De Giech...”.

Double O Medicine

National Museum of American History
The indications or uses for this product as provided by the manufacturer are:

Gonorrhea

Wood's Female Medicine

National Museum of American History

Medicine Crow

Catalog of American Portraits

Big Medicine

Catalog of American Portraits

Medicine-woman

Catalog of American Portraits

Medicine Grass

Catalog of American Portraits

Simmons Liver Regulator Medicine

National Museum of American History
The indications or uses for this product as provided by the manufacturer are:

Torpid liver, bilious diarrhea, sallowness, coated tongue; bilious affections of the stomach, liver and bowels; costiveness, sour stomach, sick headache arising from bilious condition, constipation of the bowels

Double O Medicine, D48301

National Museum of American History

Double O Medicine, D48302

National Museum of American History

Dr. Swans Liver & Kidney Medicine

National Museum of American History
The indications or uses for this product as provided on its packaging: For liver complaints, such as biliousness, coated tongue, dizziness, blood disorders of mild form and constipation, blotched complexion, kidney irregularities, rheumatism

Simmons Liver Regulator or Medicine

National Museum of American History
The indications or uses for this product as provided on its packaging:

For disorders of the liver; sick headache arising from bilious condition; constipation of the bowels; sour stomach; biliousness

Rollian's Gold Seal Herb Medicine

National Museum of American History
The indications or uses for this product as provided on its packaging:

For constipation, sour stomach, ulcer-gas, coughs-colds, skin trouble, worms, kidney trouble, high blood, run down system

Dr. M.A. Simmons' Vegetable Liver Medicine

National Museum of American History

Tabloid Medicine Chest

National Museum of American History
This japanned metal chest was manufactured by London based medical supplier Burroughs, Wellcome & Company during the latter third of the 19th Century. This period is celebrated for its fascination with exploration, and Burroughs Wellcome designed many of the medical chests that accompanied the era's most prominent expeditions, including those undertaken by Henry Morton Stanley, Robert E. Peary and Theodore Roosevelt.

This example is described in the 1895 Burroughs Wellcome catalog as a "Congo" medical chest. The title is certainly appropriate, for that is where the chest was employed, carried by American soldier-of-fortune Richard Dorsey Mohun (1864-1915) during various expeditions within the African Congo between 1880 and 1910. The center compartment contains 36 medicine bottles. The other compartments hold such necessities as bandages and dressings, first aid agents, a hypodermic syringe outfit, and small surgical tools.

In his day, Mohun was acknowledged as one of the most important Americans working in Africa. An entrepreneur and mercenary adventurer, Mohun was involved in numerous exploits in the Congo Free State, including being named representative of King Leopold of Belgium in control of the military operations that led to the establishment of the Belgian Congo in 1908. As one of the most important figures in the region, Mohun reflects American involvement in the development and exploitation of colonial Africa at the turn of the century.

Baby Percy Medicine or Dr. McDonald's Celebrated Prescription

National Museum of American History
The indications or uses for this product as provided by the manufacturer are:

For diarrhea, indigestion, cholera infantum and summer complaints of children. Relieves sour stomach instantly. A safe and reliable teething and colic medicine for babies.

The Medicine Shoppe Baby Powder

National Museum of American History
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