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Medicine

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
From card: "Small paper envelope, inscribed only in Chinese."

Medicine

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
From card: "Package of "Chan Li Chai". Marked "Made in Hong Kong.""

Medicine

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Medicine

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Medicine

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Medicine

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
FROM CARD: "CARRIED BY THIEVES."

Father John's Medicine

National Museum of American History
The indications or uses for this product as provided by the manufacturer are: A nutritive tonic and a wholesome medicine. Recommended for relief of coughs due to colds and throat irritation resulting from colds by its soothing effect on the throat.

Medicine

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
FROM CARD: "BADGERS PAW MOUNTED IN BEADWORK AND DECORATED WITH WOODPECKER FEATHERS. USED AS "MEDICINE" BY RUBBING DOWNWARD ON THE PATIENT A DEMITIC [?] AFFECT IS PRODUCED. INVENTORIED 1975."

Medicine Chest

National Museum of American History
This small wooden drug chest has a hinged lid with a bale handle and two hinged side compartments. The exterior of the chest is embellished with metal straps, hinges, and incised stylized flowers. Inside are four drawers with stamped pewter knobs and three compartments for bottles. The chest and drawers are lined with marbled paper. All of the bottles are blown and molded glass. Five of the bottles have pewter caps, and two have glass stoppers. The four pewter containers have pewter caps. One drawer is filled with a white powder. By the 18th century medicine chest of this type had become more or less standardized and available to the general population. They were used in the home as well as for travel over land and on the water. The Deutsche Apotheken Museum has a similar but slightly larger medicine chest in their collection which is illustrated in Das Deutsche Apotheken Museum, figure 256.

medicine bowl

National Museum of American History

medicine chest

National Museum of American History

medicine case

National Museum of American History

Medicine Chest

National Museum of American History
Domestic medicine chests were popular with nobility in the 18th century, although not all were as large or elaborate as this object. Besides holding and keeping expensive medicines safe, chests like this one were used for storing jewelry and other valuables. Many medicine chests commissioned by nobility were one of a kind creations, made from rare woods and precious metals. Interior lids were sometimes painted with pastoral scenes or iconic imagery.This chest is said to have belonged to Madame la Cometesse Giech whose family lived and ruled Thurnau, Bavaria, from 1695 to 1796.

This large wooden medicine chest has a metal hinged lid and a drawer at the front of the cabinet. (The door is no longer attached to the cabinet) The interior lid has a shallow compartment secured to the door with a hook. Wrought-iron straps, brackets, hinges, escutcheons, and pulls support the chest and add a decorative element. The lid opens to reveal the chest's largest compartment, which is partitioned into fifty smaller sections that hold medicine bottles. The smaller drawers below the main compartment have round wrought-iron or turned wooden knobs. Each compartment and the drawers are lined with red, blue, blue green, orange, and ivory marbled paper.

Eighteen drawers contain glass bottles of various shapes, sizes, and colors. In addition there are bone fragments, minerals, round ointment containers, pill boxes, a nutmeg grater, a funnel, a brass scale, a round wooden bead, and handwritten notes. The bottles in the main compartment are free-blown and made of clear or green glass. Some of the bottles have pewter lids. Other bottles are wrapped in marbled paper and secured with string. A few of the bottles have handwritten prescriptions in German that are attached with string at their necks. Most labels are illegible, and glued to the bottles or the lids. Other drawers contain various odds and ends, including three stones: two bright blue and one a white crystal; three small round ointment containers, two pewter, one ivory; one scale and one balance, and three animal jaw bones with very sharp pointed teeth.

Oval wooden pill boxes are covered and lined with the same decorative marbled paper as the drawers, several of which have wax seals. Many of the lids have written inscriptions. Some of the boxes contain residual powders or pills. One folded packet of paper contains a yellow green powder. Preserved in a plastic bag are several pieces of paper, one marked in black ink, “Beib silien Babe. 1724” A faded envelope is marked in ink, “Madame ...la comtesse De Giech...”.

Father John's Medicine

National Museum of American History

medicine dropper

National Museum of American History

medicine chest

National Museum of American History

spoon, medicine

National Museum of American History

medicine dispenser

National Museum of American History

medicine chest

National Museum of American History

medicine chest

National Museum of American History

medicine chest

National Museum of American History

medicine chest

National Museum of American History

medicine chest

National Museum of American History

medicine spoon

National Museum of American History
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