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Found 1,253 Resources

Iowa linguistics

National Anthropological Archives
Negative Microfilm on file.

Dorsey number 91-C (part). Old number 3172 (part)

typescript and autograph document

Consists of "Iowa Grammar," pages 73-88 and 2 unnumbered pages. Conjugations of Iowa verbs, 26 pages. Miscellaneous notes, 6 pages.

Material on Siouan linguistics

National Anthropological Archives
Microfilm reel # 8.

Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Original number 1460 (complete)

autograph and typescript document

Includes 47 page paper on Omaha, Oto, and Winnebago verbal roots, miscellaneous notes on "Omaha-Cegiha verbal roots," and an "Omaha Syllabary."

Ethnology; physical anthropology; linguistics

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Herero Linguistics, 1953 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives

Miscellaneous notes on Siouan linguistics

National Anthropological Archives
Microfilm reel # 8.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Old number 3804 (part)

autograph and typescript document

Contents: "Omaha Syllabary," 1 page; Dakota and Omaha place names, 2 pages; Ponca paradigm of "with," [1870s ?]; "The Siouan Alphabet," 3 pages; Ponca [?] song, 1 page.

Notes on Siouan linguistics, mainly phonetics

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Old number 1483 (part)

autograph and typescript document

When Genetics and Linguistics Challenge the Winners’ Version of History

Smithsonian Magazine
New research shows that indigenous Peruvians were more resilient than the conquering Inca gave them credit for

Gabriela Pérez Báez, Curator of Linguistics (Part 1 of 2)

National Museum of Natural History
Gabriela Pérez Báez, Curator of Linguistics in our Anthropology Department, is fascinated by all that you can learn about the structure of a language and about humans' ability to communicate.

Gabriela Pérez Báez, Curator of Linguistics (Part 1 of 2)

National Museum of Natural History
Gabriela Pérez Báez, Curator of Linguistics in our Anthropology Department, is fascinated by all that you can learn about the structure of a language and about humans' ability to communicate. Videographers: Raphael Talisman and Karma Foley Produced by Ann Kaupp, Anthropology Outreach Office

John Peabody Harrington papers: Major writings on linguistics, circa 1907-circa 1957

National Anthropological Archives
Microfilm and digital surrogates of microfilm are available. See Volume 8, reels 29-35. Only original documents created by Harrington, his collaborators and field assistants, or notes given to him were microfilmed.

Electronic inventory available. Consult with archivist. For a comprehensive description of these materials, see "The papers of John Peabody Harrington in the Smithsonian Institution, 1907-1957, Volume 8, A guide to: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies," edited by Elaine L. Mills, Louise G. Mills, and Ann J. Brickfield. http://anthropology.si.edu/naa/harrington/pdf/mf_guides/jp%20harrington%20guide%20-%20volume%208.pdf

This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains materials that represent John P. Harrington's work preparing a major work on linguistics. The results of his efforts were four separate manuscripts that not published.

The first manuscript is untitled. Related materials consist of handwritten notes and fragmentary rough drafts. There are extracts from a number of published sources which include linguistic data for Greek, Latin, Sanskrit, Chinese, Turkish, Korean, and English as well as a number of American Indian languages. Also included here is material relating to grammatical terminology. There are extracts from a variety of dictionaries, copies of incoming and outgoing letters, and records of interviews.

Files for a manuscript titled "Linguistics" consist of extensive notes, a rough draft, a final draft, illustrations, and a draft of a review of the manuscript. The notes contain a mixture of reading notes, records of interviews, summaries of letters, and newspaper clippings. There are also references to a number of brief discussions which Harrington had at the two linguistic conferences he attended in 1940. At the meeting of the Linguistic Institute in Ann Arbor, Michigan, he learned about the work of Della Brunsteter on Cherokee and made records of a conversation with C. F. Voegelin and his Ojibwa informant, Gregor McGregor. At the Summer Institute of Linguistics at Sulphur Springs, Arkansas, he obtained details on Tule phonetics from a San BIas informant and spoke with Eunice Pike (the sister of Kenneth Pike) and Florence Hansen who were preparing a primer of the Mazatec language. There is also Navajo linguistic information from speaker Howard Gorman, some obtained directly from him and the remainder enclosed in correspondence from Robert W. Young. In addition there is a discrete file of notes which Harrington compiled from and about Kenneth L. Pike. Interspersed with his rough draft are notes reflecting his attempt to devise a personal phonetic system. The draft of a review of his manuscripts was written by Harrington, evidently to serve as a model for a review which would appear under the signature of a colleague.

The third manuscript in this subseries is a revised version of the previous manuscript. The files contain material that Harrington accumulated after submitting the original manuscript to Smithsonian Secretary Charles Abbott in 1941. These include notes recorded from Joseph White and a note from Truman Michelson, several bibliographies, illustrations, and scattered notes reflecting Harrington's attempt to develop a personal system of phonetics. Data from many languages are represented, although there is slightly more emphasis on the North American Indian languages than in the previous manuscript; extracts from Harrington's own field notes are included.

The fourth manuscript is titled "Language" and is represented by a mostly handwritten draft. The draft is basically a sequence of random ideas grouped loosely in outline fashion under the major headings "Phonetics," "Morphology," and "Writing."

The final file in this series contains copies of correspondence which were interfiled with Harrington's notes and writings on linguistics. The letters, which span the dates 1936 to 1951, have been arranged chronologically; three undated items have been placed at the end. Both incoming and outgoing letters are included. The most noteworthy item is a letter from Frank T. Siebert, Jr., dated July 23, 1944. It contains numerous suggestions for improving a chapter which Harrington wrote on phonology.

Linguist staff

National Museum of African Art
Wood staff, black in color, elaborately carved and accented with sections of gold leaf, topped by a wood finial covered with gold leaf and depicting two men seated on stools with a low table between them. One of the men has his hand poised over the food bowl that rests in front of them on the table. The finial is separately carved and fits into the top of the shaft; the shaft is carved in three parts which are attached through dowels. Decorative banding along the shaft is embellished with gold-leafing and has been touched-up with gold paint where the gold leaf has worn off.

Notes on Southern Arapaho linguistics, ethnology, and mythology from Jesse Rowlodge, 1929

National Anthropological Archives
National Anthropological Archives negative microfilm reel 57

Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Title changed from "Linguistics; some ethnology and mythology 1929" 3/13/2014.

Notes collected by Truman Michelson from Jesse Rowlodge on Southern Arapaho linguistics, ethnology, and mythology. Primarily Arapaho terms and phrases with English glosses. On page 67 is text dictated by Rowlodge on Arapaho migration across the Missouri River. The text is in Arapaho with both interlinear and free translations in English. There are also some loose sheets at the end of the notebook handwritten by Rowlodge. Among these is text by Rowlodge on the sun dance.

Notes on Kansa sociology, genealogies and linguistics 1882-1883 and 1889-1890

National Anthropological Archives
Microfilm reel # 6.

Digital surrogates are available online.

Old number 3165 (complete)

autograph document

Siouan linguistic notes

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Old number 1480 (part c)

Part of the typed material appears in Smithsonian Institution-AR 1883, pages 919-929, "On the Comparative Phonology of Four Siouan Languages."

typescript and autograph document

Coahuiltecan linguistic notes

National Anthropological Archives
typescript document

autograph document

Contents: "Eastern affinities of the Coahuiltecan Languages" (Coahuilteco stems compared with those in several Southeastern languages including Natchez, Atakapa, Tunica, Timucua, Hitichi, Creek, etc., 5 slips; "Coahuilteco Vowel Harmony," 1 slip; words of unidentified [Coahuiltec ?] language (Autograph document), 1 slip.

Miscellaneous linguistic notes

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Linguistic material 1877

National Anthropological Archives
Filmed for University of California, Berkeley, 1955.

77 pages filled.

Biloxi linguistic notes

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

In envelope marked in Dorsey's handwriting "Biloxi notes not yet copied on slips."

Old number 1436 (part)

autograph and typescript document

Linguistic material 1857

National Anthropological Archives
Negative microfilm of the comparative vocabulary and correspondence is on Reel 33.

Letter to George Gibbs, transmitting three "upper Rogue River" vocabularies. Fort Yamhill, Oregon Territory. January 10, 1857. Autograph letter signed 4 pages. Comparative vocabulary of Applegate, Ta-kil-ma, and Uppa (Shasta). [Fort Yamhill, Oregon Territory] [Before January 10, 1857] Manuscript document 8 pages. Individual Applegate Creek and Ta-kil-ma vocabularies. [Fort Yamhill, Oregon Territory] Before January 10, 1857] Manuscript document 12 pages. Gibbs, George. Drafts of two letters to W. B. Hazen, concerning the collection of vocabularies and creation myths. Port Townsend, Washington Territory. February 26, 1856 [1857], and March 16 [1857]. Autograph document signed 11 pages.

Both the comparative and the individual vocabularies are copies by George Gibbs. The individual vocabularies are recorded in Comparative Vocabulary. The draft of the February 26 letter from Gibbs to Hazen contains a Nisqually creation myth. The comparative vocabulary is annotated by A. C. Anderson (compare Athapascan Manuscript number 123), with a few later Manuscript notes by A. S. Gatschet and J. C. Pilling. Although the individual Applegate Creek vocabulary is also labeled "Nabiltse," it is not the same language as Nabiltse (compare Nabiltse Manuscript number 131).

Linguistic notes (Series 11)

National Anthropological Archives
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