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Abbott Laboratories

National Museum of American History

Thompson Yates Laboratories report

Smithsonian Libraries
Subtitle of v. 1, Reprints; v. 2, Reprints & reports.

Also available online.

Issued by: Thompson Yates Laboratories, University of Liverpool.

Elecresource

Physical Research Laboratories Seal Stamp

National Museum of American History
This metal seal reads: PHYSICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES, INC. [/] INCORPORATED [/] MAY 32, [/] 1951 [/] CALIFORNIA. A further mark reads: RT (/) POCKET SEAL (/) PAT. OCT.23,23 (/) MADE IN U.S.A. The object has a cloth case

United States Fish Commission laboratories

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
One of numerous prints in this file

United States Fish Commission laboratories in the Armory Building in Washington, D.C., c. 1880s. The engraving shows fish tanks and equipment, including fish culture apparatus and possible model of a fish ladder in left foreground.

United States Fish Commission Laboratories

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
One of numerous prints in this file

United States Fish Commission laboratories, perhaps in the Armory Building in Washington, D.C., c. 1880s. Shows fish tanks and equipment, and fish culture apparatus.

Winthrop Laboratories Display

National Museum of American History

Album: Bell Laboratories Record

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
On a cocoa brown background, cream-colored, razor-thin vertical lines are placed at varying intervals in a pattern which repeats several times from left to right edge. Bell/ Laboratories/ Record, in the same cream color, is imprinted in serif-style capitals, with the left and right margins unjustified.

The present object is the major component of a unit formed with 1956-47-84-ii.

Worcester Optiacal Supply Laboratories

National Museum of American History

three Tyco Laboratories thermocouples

National Museum of American History

Seidlitz Powders Valentine Laboratories

National Museum of American History

Seidlitz Powders Valentine Laboratories

National Museum of American History

A. H. Parsons Laboratories

National Museum of American History

Laboratories Dr. Ph. Chapelle

National Museum of American History

Federal Laboratories Gas Billy

National Museum of American History

United States Fish Commission laboratories

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
One of numerous prints in this file

United States Fish Commission laboratories in the Armory Building in Washington, D.C., c. 1880s. Five members of the Fish Commission staff are moving containers with results of fish culture. Fish tanks are visible in rear.

Passive Alcohol Sensor, Lion Laboratories

National Museum of American History
First PAS (passive alcohol sensor) unit to use a fuel call sensor, which is more sensitive and rugged that the semi-conductor used in the original Nippon-Seiki passive sensor. This was the first Lion Laboratories attempt at producing a fuel cell unit.

Thompson Yates and Johnston Laboratories report

Smithsonian Libraries
Called New series.

Also available online.

Issued by the Thompson Yates and Johnston Laboratories, University of Liverpool.

MSC set: Vol. 6, pt. 2, copy 2, 39088016701872, bound separately, gift of Harry Hoogstraal (book-plate).

Elecresource

Dena? Topical Anesthetic, McLean Laboratories

National Museum of American History

Album: Bell Laboratories Record (Extension)

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
The present object is not discrete; it forms a unit with 1956-47-84-hh.

Control Panel, Bell Telephone Laboratories Model 5 Computer

National Museum of American History
This control panel is a small part of a very large programmable calculator built by Bell Telephone Laboratories of New York for the U.S. Army. By the mid-twentieth century, improving communications required complicated calculations. In order to improve the clarity and range of long distance voice signals, George Stibitz, a research mathematician at Bell Labs, needed to do calculations using complex numbers. Stibitz and Bell Labs engineer Sam Williams completed a machine for this purpose in 1939–it later was called the Bell Labs Model I. With the outbreak of World War II, Stibitz and Bell Labs turned their attention to calculations related to the aiming and firing of antiaircraft guns. Stibitz proposed a new series of relay calculators that could be programmed by paper tape to do more than one kind of calculation. The BTL Model 5 was the result. The machine consisted of 27 standard telephone relay racks and assorted other equipment. It had over 9000 relays, a memory capacity of 30 7-digit decimal numbers, and took about a second to multiply 2 numbers together. Two copies of the machine were built. This one was used by the U.S. Army for ballistics work at Aberdeen, Maryland and then at Fort Bliss, Texas. Machines that used relays were reliable, but slower than those using vacuum tubes, and soon gave way to electronic computers.

Voice Activated Passive Alcohol Sensor, Lion Laboratories

National Museum of American History
PAS/VAS (passive alcohol system / voice activated system) flashlight from Analytical Systems (Lion Laboratories). This is a voice activated passive sensor that did not incorporate a flashlight. The sound sensing system was activated when a person started talking. Users held it in front of person’s face and got the person talking; the talk started the device’s pumping air and captured a breath sample for analysis. Instead of using semiconductor technology, passive sensors made by Lion Laboratories used a new sensor – the fuel cell – which allowed the unit to be much smaller. However, the device was still only a breath tester, not a flashlight.

G.M. Laboratories model 2563-A voltmeter

National Museum of American History
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