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Presentation by the American Institute of the History of Pharmacy

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

Presentation by the American Institute of the History of Pharmacy at the National Museum of History and Technology (NMHT), now known as the National Museum of American History, with Sami K. Hamarneh, Curator in the Division of Medical Sciences at NMHT.

Calculating History

Smithsonian Magazine

Calculating History

Smithsonian Magazine

Aerial View of Smithsonian Institution Building and Natural History Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The original negative number is 21393, but that negative has been lost. Note on back of photo reads, 'Used by Artist Garet Jex in making painting for Chicago Exposition.'

Aerial view from the south showing the Smithsonian Institution Building with the United States National Museum, now the National Museum of Natural History, across the Mall. South of the SIB are visible the Astrophysical Observatory sheds, the South Shed, and the elongated Air Museum in a temporary metal building. The South Yard is flanked on the left with the Freer Gallery of Art, opened to the public in 1923, and on the right with the Arts and Industries Building. On the right are temporary buildings erected during World War I and behind them is Center Market. The Mall is landscaped with winding footpaths and dense clusters of trees, reminiscent of Andrew Jackson Downing's 1851 plan for the Mall grounds. In the early 1930s the Mall was leveled and the trees cleared as part of the McMillan Commission's efforts to return Washington to the L'Enfant plan.

Construction, Natural History Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Construction of the South Porch of the new United States National Museum building, now the National Museum of Natural History, nears completion.

Natural History Building South Front

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The south front, or the Mall side, of the National Museum of Natural History soon after it opened.

The Laboratory of Natural History

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Article includes illustration from June 1, 1878 Harper's Weekly, "General Laboratory of Natural History," based on sketches and photographs by Henry W. Elliott, a naturalist, artist, and Smithsonian employee

First Smithsonian Secretary Joseph Henry long held the view that the Smithsonian Institution and the National Museum should be separate bodies, but he also realized that separating the museum from the Institution would harm the cause of natural history. He did somewhat accomplish his goal in 1871, however, by separating them within the Smithsonian Building. Henry's living quarters were housed in the East Wing's second floor, with the remainder of the east wing and the east range used for the Institution's administrative offices. The National Museum occupied the rest of the building, except for the natural history laboratory, which was relocated to the Smithsonian Building's west wing basement. The author describes the fireproofing of the west wing prior to the 1871 space rearrangements.

Natural History Building, Construction

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
This photo can also be found in RU79 B9 F5, and there are several similar photos at this location.

The Natural History Building, viewed from The Mall, south side, as it nears completion, on March 27, 1909. The dome and the south porch are still under construction. There is a wooden fence around the construction area.

Natural History Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Taken by Ruel P. Tolman, former Director of the Smithsonian's National Collection of Fine Arts, and is included in a scrapbook of photographs of Smithsonian staff, ground and buildings, exhibitions, and Washington, D.C. scenes (Section N).

The geographic location of this image is approximated by the objects pictured in the image. It is not an exact longitude and latitude.

In 1935 the Natural History Building was called the United States National Museum and is now known as the National Museum of Natural History.

Exterior view of the Natural History Building as seen from the National Mall. Three cars are parked in front of the building on Madison Drive, NW.

Sculpture Outside American History Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Sculpture, "Three Red Lines," outside the eastern facade of the National Museum of History and Technology, now the National Museum of American History.

Hands On History Room

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in Torch, December 1992

The Hands on History Room, located on the second floor of the Museum of American History just around the corner from the Star-Spangled Banner, opened December 8, 1992. 11th graders Jeremy Randall and Rebecca Walther of Watkins Mill High School in Gaithersburg, Maryland got a chance to harness a mule, an activity in the Hands on History Room. Rebecca is the daughter of NMAH Publications Specialist Susan Walther, one of many staffers who worked on the project.

Natural History Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Image taken by Ruel P. Tolman, former Director of the Smithsonian's National Collection of Fine Arts, and included in section N of a scrapbook of photographs of Smithsonian staff, grounds, buildings, exhibitions, and Washington, D.C. scenes. Alternative Negative Number 32279-11.

The geographic location of this image is approximated by the information provided in the image. It is not an exact longitude and latitude.

An alternative Negative Number 32219-11 is written in the top border in pencil.

On the lower right edge there are five semicircular cuts into the image.

Slightly to the right of its dome, the Natural History Building, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, seen from the middle of the National Mall,. Bare deciduous trees partially obscure the building, and one coniferous tree stands in front of the portico to the south entrance of the building. There are two cars parked on Madison Drive.

National Museum of American History

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The north facade of the National Museum of History and Technology, now the National Museum of American History. View is from Constitution Avenue. Fountains are visible in front of the Museum and the Washington Monument in right rear.

NMAH's Hands on History Room

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in Torch, September 1993

Visitors work at a sewing machine in the "More Work for Mother" section of the Hands on History Room in the National Museum of American History. The section relates to the late 19th- and early 20th-century work typically done by women.

Rotunda of Natural History Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The original negative number is 12338, but that negative could not be located on file. The original photograph was re-scanned, given new negative and digital file numbers.

Mammals are on exhibit in the Rotunda of the United States National Museum, now the National Museum of Natural History. A giraffe stands at center in front of glass cases containing mammal specimens.

Office of Naval History Staff

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
A naval historian, Lundeberg (1923-) came to the Smithsonian in January 1959 as a Consultant in the Department of Armed Forces History in the Museum of History and Technology, now known as National Museum of American History, and in June of that year was appointed Associate Curator in the Division of Naval History. From 1962 to 1984 Lundeberg was Curator of Naval History and In 1984, when the Divisions of Naval and Military History were merged to form the Division of Armed Forces History, he was named Curator of Armed Forces History. Following his retirement in 1986, he was named Curator Emeritus of Armed Forces History in 1987.

Rear Admiral Samuel E. Morison and his staff are at his office in the Office of Naval History (Op-29) at the Navy Department Building on Constitution Avenue. A believer in the morale value of staff photos, Samuel E. Morrison also provided for all staff neckties ordered from London. L to R: Roger Pineau, office manager, Japanese linguist, preliminary editor, later with S.I. Press and Director of the Navy Museum; Philip K. B. Lundeberg, researcher on the Battle of the Atlantic and German translator, later Curator of Naval History, National Museum of American History; Samuel E. Morison, Professor of History at Harvard University, on temporary active duty with Op-29; Richard Saltonstall Pattee, researcher on U.S. submarines in the Pacific, later career with Office of Naval Intelligence; Donald R. Martin, Morison's wartime yeoman, based on Pearl Harbor, continued with "the skipper" through completion of all fifteen volumes of Morison's "Operational History." Note the neckties.

Natural History Building After Snow Storm

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
See Neg. # 26870-A for photo of same snow storm

The stairs leading to the south entrance of the National Museum of Natural History after a snow storm with a small path cleared through the snow.

National Museum of Natural History, 1965

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Exterior view of the West Wing of the Natural History Building upon completion. Photograph is taken from the sidewalk looking northeast, an ice cream vendor is on the street corner across from the museum.

Bookstore of American History Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The bookstore at the National Museum of American History, as viewed from the exterior of the building (north or Constitution Avenue side). Reflected in the window are the Federal Triangle buildings across the street. A placard reading "Smithsonian Bookstore, A McGraw-Hill Enterprise" is visible through the window.

National Museum of American History

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Exterior view of the Mall side of the National Museum of American History, July 1, 1982. The view shows how light and shadow are used by the architect to create architectural detail on a starkly modernist facade.

Baird Auditorium, Natural History Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Original negative number is 97-3050 and 30048, but that negative has been lost. Printed in USNM Bulletin 80 (Richard Rathbun)

View of the newly completed Baird Auditorium, looking towards the stage, in the new National Museum Building, now known as the National Museum of Natural History. The auditorium is located under the Rotunda. The elegant classically inspired room features a domed ceiling of Guastavino tiles.

Natural History Building Ground Breaking

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Ground breaking for the new United States National Museum Building, now the National Museum of Natural History, June 15, 1904. Included in the picture are: Secretary Samuel P. Langley, Assistant Secretary Richard Rathbun, J. S. Goldsmith, Bernard R. Green, J. C. Hornblower (Architect), George C. Maynard, Guard Captain Dolah, R.I. Geare, Mrs. M. J. Spottswood, and Mrs. Paul Banerett.

Collecting bracero history

National Museum of American History

History of Traveler's Checks

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
An exhibit, which opened February 19, 1964, on the History of the Traveler's Check was displayed in the Monetary History Hall of the Smithsonian Institution's Arts and Industries Building. The exhibit was drawn largely from items made available by the American Express Company, the general manager of the Bank of New Zealand, and Kenneth L. Kelly of the National Bureau of Standards.
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