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Found 320 Resources

Rap and Hip-Hop Bring Folk Music to New Audiences

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Summer/Fall 2016: Education

Banner for Public Enemy

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A banner that the hip-hop group Public Enemy would hang behind them when performing at various gigs. The banner is made of black canvas with the Public Enemy logo printed in red acrylic paint bordered with white.

Banner used at Public Enemy performances

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A banner that the hip hop group Public Enemy would hang behind them when performing at various gigs. The banner is made of red synthetic fabric with the Public Enemy logo printed inblack acrylic paint.

Progressive Hip-Hop with Christylez Bacon

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

GRAMMY-nominated musician Christylez Bacon is well known for his imaginative blending of acoustic and hip-hop music accompanied by oral percussion (beat-boxing) and djembe rhythms. Here, Christylez shares his music along with how he discovered beat-boxing.

Filmed and edited: Brandon Callahan

Progressive Hip-Hop with Christylez Bacon

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
GRAMMY-nominated musician Christylez Bacon is well known for his imaginative blending of acoustic and hip-hop music accompanied by oral percussion (beat-boxing) and djembe rhythms. Here, Christylez shares his music along with how he discovered beat-boxing. Videography by Brandon Callahan. Editing by Brandon Callahan. [Catalog No. CFV10418; Copyright 2013 Smithsonian Institution]

DJ Scott LaRock and KRS-One, United Skates of America, Queens

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of DJ Scott La Rock (Scott Sterling) and KRS-One (Lawrence Parker) at the United Skates of America roller skating rink in Queens. Rock, on the left, wears a Boogie Down Productions t-shirt with a heavy chain necklace with medallions and a bracelet. KRS-One, on the right, also wears a Boogie Down Productions t-shirt underneath an unbuttoned dark-colore shirt and a hat. On the verso is an eyejammie gallery label with the title and photographer.

Photograph of MC Lyte in her dressing room

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A color photograph of MC Lyte in her dressing room, ca. 1995. Lyte is sitting next to a lighted mirror and looks towards the camera with her left arm resting on the counter. She is wearing a red hat, gold earrings, yellow shirt, and red and black striped overalls. Her reflection is visible in the mirror. The print is signed and dated on the back by Michael Benabib and an inscription by Bill Adler identifies the subject and date of capture.

The Fugees, NYC, 1994

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of The Fugees in New York City, 1994. The image features the three members wearing winter coats and hats and posing together in front of window through which urban buildings can be seen. Lauryn Hill is in the center, with Wyclef Jean to her proper right and Pras Michel to her proper left. The photograph is signed by David Corio on the front and back.

Microphone box used by Ralph McDaniels on the television show Video Music Box

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A cube shaped black microphone box used on the television show The Video Music Box. The microphone box has a circular cut out through the center at the top and bottom of the cube. The interior of the cube is lined with dark gray foam. Taped to the four exterior sides of the box are black pieces of cardboard with white text that reads "VIDEO / MUSIC / BOX."

Sheet music for "Hands Off" by Suliamon El-Hadi

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Handwritten sheet music for the piece "Hands Off". Handwritten at top of sheet music is, [HANDS OFF / Written by / Suliaman El-Hadi]. Handwritten on bottom of sheet music is, [© Spoet Publishing Corp. 1972 Copyright]. Handwriting appears on front and back of paper, with folded inside being blank.

Photograph of Mary J. Blige at the NY Music Awards after party at China Club

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of Mary J. Blige at the New York Music Awards after party at China Club in New York City. The image features Blige lowering her sunglasses to peer at the camera while leaning against a wall or column. In the background, a neon sign for the China Club is partially visible above a banner reading "New York Music Awards." On the back are inscriptions by Bill Adler identifying the photographer, subject, location, and date.

Speaker used as part of a DJ setup

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A speaker rectangular in shape and painted black. The top of the front of the speaker concaves inward, towards the back. The back of the concaved section is covered in mesh. At the bottom of the concaved section there is a metal plate that reads: [PROPERTY OF M&M STUDIO / 2503 3RD AVENUE / BRONX, NEW YORK 10451 / (212) 292- 3683]. The bottom portion of the front is covered in mesh. The back of the speaker has an outlet at the bottom. The proper right and proper left sides, the bottom, and the top of the speaker are all flat and painted black.

Deuce

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The record and sleeve for Kurtis Blow's album "Deuce." Image of musician with black & red leather jacket standing in front of a cinema marquee advertising his recording. Released on the Mercury label of PolyGram Records.

Toy train car with print of grafitti artwork by Dondi White

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A toy train car with the facade covered in an inkjet image of graffiti that spells D-O-N-D-I and has a large green hand with its palm open and reaching towards to the D on the left side. This toy was created after Dondi White's death.

Cordless microphone used by Rakim to record The 18th Letter

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A wireless microphone used by Rakim to record the album "The 18th Letter" (1997). The hand-held microphone has a circular silver mesh wire grill covering the foam interior of the microphone. The grill is attached to a black plastic cylindrical handle with text printed in silver type near the attachment reading "SHURE" and "BETA 58A" twice around. The handle is made from two pieces, with a small square digital display screen on the top half of the handle bordered by gray plastic, with "L3 638-698 MHz" printed in white type below it. White type reading "UR2" on two opposing sides is printed at the bottom of the lower half of the handle. A smaller round-edged cylindrical piece of black plastic protudes from the bottom of the handle. The bottom half of the handle (b) screws off to reveal a battery chamber that holds two (2) AA batteries. Opposite the battery chamber is a digital push-button menu with four buttons reading clockwise from top: up-facing arrow, "enter", down-facing arrow, "exit". The button menu is directly below the digital display screen on the exterior of the top half of the handle. Beneath the buttons is a manufacturer's label with serial and model numbers, and a key for the menu buttons.

Z77 air gun used as part of S1W uniform

National Museum of African American History and Culture
An air gun used as a stage prop by a member of S1W. The gun is made from black plastic and metals painted black. It is formed to look like an Uzi submachine gun, but has a black plastic air pump mechanism extending from the back end. Raised text on the proper right side reads "MODEL / Z77 / BB CAL / CROSMAN / AIRGUNS / 188512052". Raised text on the proper left side reads "CAUTION / BEFORE USING--READ INSTRUCTIONS / AVAILABLE FROM / CROSMAN AIRGUNS / East Bloomfield, NY U.S.A. / A COLEMAN COMPANY". There is a safety lock on the proper left side with raised text next to the up position reading "UP FIRE" and text next to the down position reading "DOWN SAFE". A screw at the bottom of the handle can be removed so the gun can be mounted on a stand.

Chromogenic print of The Last Mr. Bigg in Mobile, Alabama

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A color photograph of Alabama rapper The Last Mr. Bigg.

Bigg is pictured seated, wearing a green Chicago White Sox jacket and hat, and smoking.

He has a white gauze bandage over his proper right eye, with black sunglasses on top. The green baseball cap reads [SOX] diagonally in white. He is wearing a white ribbed shirt under the green jacket. There is a red "C" on the left side of the jacket, outlined in white and then yellow. The word [SOX] is on top of the "C" in white with a yellow outline. He has a goatee and long fingernails. He is holding a cigarette in his mouth with his right hand. His left hand is making a fist and is on top of a newspaper on his lap. He is sitting in a white chair and there is some house siding and a window visible behind him.

There is an inscription on the verso, handwritten by Bill Adler, identifying the subject, location, date and photographer.

Photograph of The Fat Boys in NYC

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of The Fat Boys against a light-colored brick wall. Prince Markie Dee (Mark Anthony Morales) is to the left of frame, wearing a light-colored sweatsuit and a large rope chain with cross medallion. He holds his right hand up in a peace sign, while he leans against Darren Robinson (also known as "Buff Love" and "The Human Beatbox") with his left arm. Robinson is in the middle of the frame wearing a light and dark color blocked shirt and an extra large rope chain around neck. He is smiling at the camera and holds both hands at waist level, gesturing with peace signs. Kool Rock-Ski is to the right of frame, wearing a Chicago Bears sweatshirt and a sideways baseball cap. He is looking and pointing with both hands towards the camera. On the back of the photograph are inscriptions by Bill Adler identifying the photographer, subject, location, and date.

Speaker used as part of a DJ setup

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A speaker made by Altec. The speaker is rectangular in shape and is painted black. The top of the front of the speaker concaves inward, towards the back. The concaved sides have white and blue stickers on them that read: [ALTEC / Voice of the Theatre]. The middle of the front is black and white and reads: [ALTEC]. The bottom portion of the front is covered in mesh. The back of the speaker has outlets and the proper right and proper left sides of the speaker have handles. The bottom of the speaker has four casters at each corner.

Tweeter box speakers used as part of a DJ setup

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Tweeter box speakers. The tweeters or speakers, five in total, are surrounded by a lather box. The top of the box has a handle and each corner of the box is protected by a metal edge. The tweeters run across the front of the he box. Each tweeter is fastened to the box on their edges by four screws. The speaker box is all black with some metal that is silver in color. The back of the box is all leather and has panel that is secured by metal fasteners on the back corners. The center of the panel has a cut-out that has red and black plastic switches and a metal input or output. The speaker’s leather is cracked.

Subwoofer for DJ setup

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A wood subwoofer. The sub is painted black. Four sides of the sub are all wood and flat. The front side has is wood but has two hollowed out sections that angle inward. One of the holloed out sections has multicolored tape attached to one of the angled pieces of wood. The back side has four casters and two white plastic plugs. The wood and paint is chipped throughout the sub.

Subwoofer for DJ setup

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A wood subwoofer. The sub is painted black. Four sides of the sub are all wood and flat. The front side has is wood but has two hollowed out sections that angle inward. The back side has four casters and two white plastic plugs. The wood and paint is chipped throughout the sub.

Tweeter box speakers used as part of a DJ setup

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Tweeter box speakers. The tweeters or speakers, five in total, are surrounded by a leather box. The top of the box has a handle and each corner of the box is protected by a metal edge. The tweeters run across the front of the he box. Each tweeter is fastened to the box on their edges by four screws. Some of the tweeters are missing their screws. The speaker box is all black with some metal that is silver in color. The back of the box is all leather and has panel that is secured by staples. The panel has a cut-out towards the proper right that has three input or output holes. The speaker’s leather is cracked and has frayed edges.

Amplifier used as part of a DJ setup

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A metal Tapco amplifier model CP 500. The front of the amplifier has black dials that include two power lock dials, a power dial, and two channel dials. Above the dials, white text reads: [TAPCO CP 500 / dual channel power amplifier]. There are two black handles on either side of the front, as well as a white sticker that written by hand: [# 19]. The back of the amplifier has four inputs, a fan, a fuse, a power cord, and four outputs.
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