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Habitat

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Habitat

National Museum of American History

Habitat

National Museum of American History

Conran's Habitat

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Smithsonian Gardens, Habitat Exhibition, Habitat of Flight

Smithsonian Gardens
For centuries, humans have sought inspiration from nature while studying the mysteries of flight. Visit Habitat of Flight to discover how birds and seeds adapted to fit their habitats and inspired humans in their efforts to take to the skies.

Zoo Habitat Design

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teacher-created lesson in which young students apply knowledge of animal adaptations in the design of a zoo habitat--one that meets the needs of a specific animal.

Butterfly Habitat, STS-93

National Air and Space Museum
This is a duplicate of the habitat flown for a butterfly metamorphosis experiment aboard space shuttle Columbia on the STS-93 mission in July 1999. This box was used in the ground control experiment conducted concurrently with the flight.

The habitat housed Painted Lady (Cynthia cardui) butterflies in different stages of development, as well as a food supply in the tray of circles. The habitat was enclosed in a larger environmental container that controlled light, temperature, and a video camera to record progress of the experiment. A team of high school students and their instructors developed the experiment to investigate the effect of weightlessness on the butterfly life cycle. The project was sponsored by SPACEHAB, Inc. BioServe Space Technologies manufactured the habitat and donated it to the Museum.

Eastern Bluebird Habitat Trail

Smithsonian Gardens
Working in collaboration with Richard E. Gies, lead volunteer of the Longwood Gardens Bluebird Project, Smithsonian Gardens established an Eastern Bluebird Habitat trail around the perimeter of the Greenhouse facility in Suitland MD. The nesting boxes were installed to benefit an existing population of Bluebirds as well as to encourage more bluebirds to nest on site. Eastern Bluebird populations are on the rise thanks, in part, to efforts like this one. The lack of suitable nesting cavities caused by changing land use patterns, increasing urbanization, and competition from introduced European starlings and house sparrows has been responsible for the decline of Eastern Bluebirds populations in the past. The roofs on these nesting boxes have been planted with a variety of stonecrop (sedum) plants. The purpose of the "green roof" is to help keep the interior of the boxes cool during the hot summer months. The green roof nesting boxes were designed Richard Gies for Longwood Gardens.

World Habitat Classroom Activities

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teacher-created lesson in which students consider whether everyone in their community has access to adequate shelter. They write a persuasive paper on the subject.

Housing Naturally: Habitat as Model

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teacher-created lesson in which students create housing designs based on the habitats of animals.

Smithsonian Gardens, Habitat Exhibition, Introduction

Smithsonian Gardens
Protecting Habitats Protects Life

Habitat for the Other 90%

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teacher-created lesson in which students design a product or service that meets the needs of people living in a particular natural habitat. They also keep in mind the needs of the habitat.

Smithsonian Gardens, Habitat Exhibition, Homes

Smithsonian Gardens
Want to transform your garden into a habitat? Visit Homes to find out how you can surround yourself with beautiful plants while providing food, shelter, and water for creatures great and small.

Smithsonian Gardens, Habitat Exhibition, Nests

Smithsonian Gardens
Ever wondered what a bird nest looks like up close? In Nests, see larger-than-life replicas of birds’ nests and marvel at the diversity of these structures and the remarkable ingenuity of the creatures that build them.

ArtLab: Natural Habitat of Teens

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Karl's nature mockumentary made during ARTLAB+ April Fools theme session.

Conran's Habitat: Star in Circle

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Star in circle and flower in red, green, blue and gold. Store name in gold at bottom.

Habitat destruction: death by a thousand cuts

Smithsonian Libraries
Vast amounts of habitat destruction have already occurred. For instance, about half of all global forest cover has been lost, and forests have virtually vanished in over 50 nations Worldwide. Habitat destruction has been highly uneven among different ecosystems. From a geographic perspective, islands, coastal areas, wetlands, regions with large or growing human populations, and emerging agricultural frontiers are all sustaining rapid habitat loss. From a biome perspective, habitat loss has been very high in Mediterranean forests, temperate forest- steppe and woodland, temperate broadleaf forests, and tropical coniferous forests. Other ecosystems, particularly tropical rainforests, are now disappearing rapidly. Habitat destruction in the temperate zone peaked in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Although considerable habitat loss is occurring in some temperate ecosystems, overall forest cover is now increasing from forest regeneration and plantation establishment in some temperate regions. Primary (old-growth) habitats are rapidly diminishing across much of the earth. In their place, a variety of semi-natural or intensively managed ecosystems are being established. For example, although just two-tenths of the temperate coniferous forests have disappeared, vast areas are being converted from old-growth to timber-production forests, with a greatly simplified stand structure and species composition. Boreal ecosystems have suffered relatively limited reductions to date but are especially vulnerable to global warming. Boreal forests could become increasingly vulnerable to destructive fires if future conditions become warmer or drier.

Smithsonian Gardens, Habitat Exhibition, Sheltering Branches

Smithsonian Gardens
Discover the story of the Southern live oak tree: an enduring symbol of safety, strength, and resilience. Live oaks serve as a habitat for many species of plants and animals, but they have also played an important role in our nation’s history. Sheltering Branches explores how live oaks furnished the timber to build America’s first ships and provided African Americans with places to gather, rest, read, and reflect.

Smithsonian Gardens, Habitat Exhibition, Life Underground

Smithsonian Gardens
Did you know that beneath your feet is a network of living organisms communicating with each other? Life Underground combines art and science to reveal how organisms such as fungi interconnect in a habitat hidden below the ground.

Smithsonian Gardens, Habitat Exhibition, Native Landscape

Smithsonian Gardens
The Native Landscape at the National Museum of the American Indian features more than 33,000 plants of approximately 150 species native to our area. The grounds encompass four habitats—upland hardwood forest, wetland, cropland, and meadow—and showcase Native American crop rotation and sustainable practices.

Smithsonian Gardens, Habitat Exhibition, We Need You

Smithsonian Gardens
Native wildflowers are beautiful, but did you know they also help us produce food? As you explore the We Need You! exhibit, notice the pollinators in the meadow. Beneficial bugs attracted to native flowering plants and grasses pollinate our vegetable gardens, orchards, and croplands. We need pollinators to help us grow the food we eat.

Smithsonian Gardens, Habitat Exhibition, Bug B&B

Smithsonian Gardens
Bugs are everywhere, and they need places to live, just like us. Visit Bug B&B, a series of structures built just for bugs, to discover the vital role insects play in our ecosystem and how you can make them feel at home.
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