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Frank Brangwyn

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Duveneck

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Stella

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Stella

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Duveneck

National Portrait Gallery

Frank O'Hara

National Portrait Gallery
Frank O'Hara was one of the most important poets of mid-twentieth-century America. Rejecting abstraction and theoretical posturing, he was a leading figure in making poetry more confessional, intimate, and personal. Also an active participant in the art scene of his era, O'Hara wrote for art periodicals and frequently socialized and collaborated with artists, a number of whom drew or painted his handsome features. One painter recalled that O'Hara was extroverted, funny, and generous, and "he became your friend in about six seconds."

Don Bachardy drew his strangely haunting portrait the year before O'Hara's untimely death at age forty. Bachardy's usual practice is to draw one eye and scale the rest of the picture around it, exploiting the immediacy and tension of acute observation. He sees the process as an "exchange of energy" between two personalities at a particular moment.

Frank Walter Taylor

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Duveneck Self-Portrait

National Portrait Gallery

Larry Rivers and Frank O'Hara

National Portrait Gallery

Elaine de Kooning, Frank O'Hara and Franz Kline

National Portrait Gallery
During the 1950s, when New York City became the center of the art world, the Cedar Tavern in Greenwich Village was the preferred meeting spot for the city’s avant-garde artists, writers, and musicians. The artist Elaine de Kooning was at the very heart of it; although, later in life, she noted that she “didn’t know then that I had somehow made my way to the red-hot center.” New York was indeed a cultural capital. This photograph depicts de Kooning at a café table with two good friends, the poet Frank O’Hara (left) and the painter Franz Kline (right). O’Hara appears to react to something de Kooning has said, as he lifts his right hand up against his cheek.

En la década de 1950, cuando Nueva York se convirtió en el centro del arte, el bar Cedar Tavern de Greenwich Village era el lugar preferido de encuentro para los artistas, escritores y músicos de vanguardia. La pintora Elaine de Kooning estuvo en medio de todo, aunque más tarde comentaría que “en ese momento no sabía que había logrado llegar al centro candente de la acción”. Nueva York era, en efecto, una capital cultural. En esta foto aparece De Kooning en una mesa con dos buenos amigos, el poeta Frank O’Hara (izquierda) y el pintor Franz Kline (derecha). O’Hara parece reaccionar a algo que ha dicho De Kooning mientras se lleva la mano derecha a la mejilla.

Oral history interview with Frank Holliday, 2017 January 24-26

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 5 sound files (5 hr., 18 min.) digital, wav Transcript: 136 pages An interview with Frank Holliday conducted 2017 January 24 and 26, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Holliday Studios in New York, New York.
Holliday speaks of a beautiful relationship with his Grandmother Holliday; growing up in suburbia with a glamorous mother and industrialist father; being encouraged to draw and paint constantly to keep busy and out of trouble; realizing at a young age that art can bring happiness and cheer to others; feeling free and open until society told him he was different and the resulting need to protect himself by trying to be super-masculine; attending junior high in Greensboro, North Carolina during integration and becoming a young politician bringing people and groups together; studying ballet at the North Carolina School of the Arts during high school; continuing his study in New York City until visiting the Museum of Modern Art and deciding he was destined to be a painter; moving to San Francisco at age 18 to live among gay people; the utopian counter-culture that existed before AIDS; making art constantly through photography, film, painting; the theft of much of his early work over the years; realizing he needed to return to New York to escape his street-oriented lifestyle in San Francisco; attending School of Visual Arts; studying gay men semiotically through signs and social cues with Keith Haring and Bill Beckley; working at Warhol's Factory on Union Square and Interview magazine; the genesis of Club 57; imagining his sets at Club 57 as installations with live people; the appeal of his projects being anti-everything; learning about a "gay cancer" and his then-boyfriend becoming sick and dying from an unknown brain issue; living under the assumption that he was HIV-positive for eight years before falling extremely ill with pneumonia; learning of his HIV/AIDS diagnosis two weeks before "the cocktail" came out in 1996; his breakthrough show "Trippin' in America" in 2001; the process of getting sober six years before his diagnosis; learning to make art without the feeling the need to rely on drugs for creativity; meeting his partner of nineteen years and learning to feel worthy of love; self-hatred and homophobia after getting sober; gaining a tremendous respect and appreciation for the gay community living bravely just as they were; witnessing the World Trade Center towers collapse on 9/11; answering a Craigslist ad and being cast in a movie; acting in several films including "American Gangster;" trading three years of acting lessons with Bill Esper for one painting; how acting helped with his painting; comparing his body being tuned to painting as a dancer's is to music; how living with AIDS has made him very aware of the physical-ness of his body and what it means to be alive; the importance of leaving his mark on his art; academia taking over the art world; feeling looked over in retrospectives of AIDS artists, but identifying more as a human with a disease than as an "AIDS artist;" and purposefully leaving room in his paintings to allow the viewer to enter and experience. Holliday also recalls Harvey Milk, Michael Lowe, Mike Bidlo, Philip Taaffe, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Art Garibay, Henry Post, Bill Collum, and Elizabeth Murray.

Oral history interview with Mary Frank, 2010 Jan. 10- Feb. 3

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 8 memory cards (6 hr., 43 min.) secure digital; 1.25 in. Transcript 135 p. An interview interview with Mary Frank conducted 2010 Jan. 10, 11, and Feb. 3, by Judith Olch Richards, for the Archives of American Art, at Frank's home and studio, in New York, N.Y.
Ms. Frank speaks of her childhood in England and her evacuation to Brooklyn during WWII; her initial intention of becoming a professional dancer and studying with the Martha Graham Dance Company; her marriage and travels with photographer Robert Frank; the difficulties of women teaching art; teaching methods; her time at The New School and Queens College; western and non-Western influences; mushroom hunting; solar cookers; her works in clay, sculpture, painting, drawing, monoprint, and triptych installations; her relationships with the galleries Zabriskie, Midtown Payton and DC Moore; Frank also recalls Willem de Kooning, Ruben Nakian, Allan Kaprow, Marjorie Ponce Israel, Joe Chaikin, Paul Cadmus, Henrietta Mantooth Bagley, Joan Snyder, Elanor Munro, Jean-Louise Bourgeois, and others.

Oral history interview with Frank Lobdell, 1980 Apr. 9-May 7

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 7 sound cassettes Transcript: 77 p. An interview of Frank Lobdell conducted 1980 Apr. 9-1980 May 7, by Terry St. John, for the Archives of American Art.
Lobdell speaks of his youth and family background; his early interest in art; his education; studying with Cameron Booth; his service in the U.S. Army; artist friends and influences; political influences on his work; the community of artists in San Francisco in the 1950s, including Elmer Bischoff and Clyfford Still; his "dark years"; teaching at Stanford; reviews by critics; and the avant-garde art of the 1960s. He recalls Ninfa Valvo, Douglas MacAgy, Hassel Smith, Richard Diebenkorn, Wilfred Zogbaum, Sam Francis, Jerry (Julian) Hatofsky, Claire Falkenstein, Clay Spohn, and John Hultberg.

Oral history interview with Frank Romero, 1997 January 17-March 2

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 99 pages. An interview of Frank Romero conducted 1997 January 17-March 2, by Jeffrey Rangel, for the Archives of American Art, in Romero's studio, in Los Angeles, Calif.
Romero discusses his growing up in East Los Angeles and his large extended family; his earliest art studies in the public schools; attending the Otis Art Institute where he studied with Joe Mugnaini and had contact with Millard Sheets and Peter Voulkos; the "very polyglut culture" of East Los Angeles; the influences of television, western movies, rock-and-roll, and rhythm and blues on his early musical/artistic taste; time spent in New York; returning to Los Angeles in 1969; and his marriage and family.
He describes his move into Carlos Almaraz's house which became the informal meeting place of the artist group Los Four (Almaraz, Romero, Gilbert Sanchez Lujan, and Roberto "Beto" de la Rocha); the Los Four show at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1974; and the stylistic aesthetics of Los Four.
Romero describes the "boys club" nature of Chicano art centers; his contributions to the Chicano art movement; his relationship to the Chicano/Mexican culture and mainstream U.S. culture; murals done by members of Los Four for the Inner City Mural Program; his work for the Metropolitan Transit Authority; the Murals of Aztlan exhibit in 1981 at the Craft and Folk Art Museum; and his shows at the ARCO Center for the Visual Arts. He concludes with his assessment of the Chicano arts movement, the relationship between economic and art cycles, and the role of the more established artists to those of a younger generation.

Oral history interview with Frank Dolejska, 1979 August 14

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 31 pages An interview of Frank Dolejska conducted 1979 August 14, by Sandra Curtis Levy, for the Archives of American Art.
Dolejska speaks of the formation and early history of the Contemporary Arts Association in Houston and his involvement with it; early exhibits they had; collectors and patrons who were involved; reasons for his leaving CAA; his own art and the decision to take up metalwork; starting a crafts gallery; his personal history, including his family background and the development of his style.

Oral history interview with Frank S. Okada, 1990 Aug. 16-17

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 87 p.

An interview of Frank Okada conducted 1990 Aug. 16-17, in Seattle, Wash., by Barbara Johns, for the Archives of American Art Northwest Asian American Project. Okada discusses his parents' background; his family including his brothers, John, author of "No-No Boy," and Charlie, a graphic designer; traveling to Japan for the Pacific Northwest Artists and Japan exhibition; being in an internment camp; painting in Eugene, Ore. and Seattle, Wash.; his painting techniques; studying under Leon Derbyshire; his connection with the jazz scene in Seattle in the late 1940s and 1950s including musicians Sammy Davis, Ray Charles, and Quincy Jones; attending Cornish School of Art, Seattle; meeting Mark Tobey; comparision of his painting style to Tobey's; his stint in the Army; attending Cranbrook Academy of Art and studying with painter Fred Mitchell; his Whitney fellowship in New York; study of Japanese, Chinese, and Zen paintings; working for Boeings in the early 1960s; traveling to France on a Guggenheim; teaching at University of Oregon in Eugene; his minimalist work; influence of Japanese art in his painting. Okada mentions Lawson Inada (Asian American poet), Frank Chin (Asian American playwright), artists David Stone Martin, James Edward Peck, Yayoi Kusama, George Tsutakawa, Paul Horiuchi, Ben Shahn, Kenjiro Nomura, Louis Bunce, Bill Ivey, and art gallery owner Zoe Dusanne.

Portrait of the Artists

National Portrait Gallery

Head of Orozco

Catalog of American Portraits

The Zeppelin Raids: The Vow of Vengeance

National Air and Space Museum
Monochrome print. Man in uniform shakes his fist at a Zeppelin that has just dropped a bomb; a dead woman lies at the feet of a woman and young boy next to the soldier.

Offset Lithograph.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Alumni, Art Student's League

National Portrait Gallery

Maxfield Parrish

National Portrait Gallery

Howard Chandler Christy

National Portrait Gallery
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