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Frank Brangwyn

National Portrait Gallery

Painter

National Portrait Gallery
Painter

Philip Guston 1913-1980

Philip Guston started his career in the 1930s as a figurative painter, became a leading abstract expressionist in the 1950s, and returned to figuration in the 1960s, when, as he said, "the brutality of the world" made him "sick and tired of all that Purity!" that abstract painting implied. Painter, produced in the infirm, final year of Guston's life, seems to illustrate a reference he made in 1978 to his work as a "battle . . . with dozens of brushes as weapons." Here, his battle-scarred and bandaged face, with its Cyclopean eye (a common self-depiction of the 1970s), stares out at his right hand. The pose alludes to his cigarette smoking; a benediction; or the artist's meditation on his future ability to produce art. Such self-reflection characterized Guston's career, which author Nicole Krauss called "an unflinching journey towards the most unflinching expression of self."

Frank Duveneck

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Stella

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Stella

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Duveneck

National Portrait Gallery

Mary Frank and Robert Frank

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Espada

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Espada

National Portrait Gallery

Painter and Faun

Catalog of American Portraits

Robert Frank

National Portrait Gallery

Frank O'Hara

National Portrait Gallery
Frank O'Hara was one of the most important poets of mid-twentieth-century America. Rejecting abstraction and theoretical posturing, he was a leading figure in making poetry more confessional, intimate, and personal. Also an active participant in the art scene of his era, O'Hara wrote for art periodicals and frequently socialized and collaborated with artists, a number of whom drew or painted his handsome features. One painter recalled that O'Hara was extroverted, funny, and generous, and "he became your friend in about six seconds."

Don Bachardy drew his strangely haunting portrait the year before O'Hara's untimely death at age forty. Bachardy's usual practice is to draw one eye and scale the rest of the picture around it, exploiting the immediacy and tension of acute observation. He sees the process as an "exchange of energy" between two personalities at a particular moment.

Frank Weston

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Gehry

National Portrait Gallery

Frank O'Hara

National Portrait Gallery
One of the most important poets of postwar America, Frank O'Hara was a leader in making American verse more intimate and personal. His style was direct and immediate, and his topics were generated from his day-to-day encounters with people and places. (O'Hara was a curator at the Museum of Modern Art and wrote poetry during his lunch hour.) His relaxed, humorous, and offhand style hid the deep seriousness with which he took his art and his subjects. His irony was instead a defensive mechanism, a tendency toward obliqueness that provided cover in a society that was threatening to gay men. O'Hara also kept much of his life hidden from his closest friends, while at the same time he allowed himself to become the subject of many of America's leading artists. The American realist Alice Neel captured O'Hara's distinctive profile, which she described as "a romantic falconlike profile with a bunch of lilacs."

Frank Walter Taylor

National Portrait Gallery

Artist Souvenir

National Portrait Gallery

Artist Conversing

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Duveneck Self-Portrait

National Portrait Gallery

William Frank Browne

National Portrait Gallery

Artist & Model

National Portrait Gallery
Artist and Model

David Hockney born 1937

David Hockney's etching grew out of an invitation to participate in a portfolio dedicated to Pablo Picasso, who died in 1973, and reflects his admiration for this father of cubism. Probably basing his rendering of Picasso on a photograph by French photographer Robert Doisneau, Hockney casts himself in an intimate tête à tête with his hero. Although fictional-the two artists were not personally acquainted-the scenario captured an important intersection between them, for Hockney created the print with Aldo Crommelynck, who had long produced prints with Picasso. Hockney's careful observation of Picasso's methods raises the question of just who is the "artist" and who is the "model" referred to in the work's title. Although Hockney's nudity suggests his role as model, it is the elder artist who serves as a subject and muse for the younger.

Frank O'Hara, 1926-1966

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Frank Lloyd Wright

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Lloyd Wright

National Portrait Gallery
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