Skip to Content

Found 69,027 Resources

force apparatus

National Museum of American History

Force Pump

National Museum of American History
This glass model of a fire engine force pump came from the Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, a Washington, D.C. school that was established in 1870 as the Preparatory High School for Colored Youth. It may date from 1916 when the school moved into a large new building. Ref: L. E. Knott Apparatus Co., Harcourt Equipment for Physics (Cambridge, Mass., 1928), p. 74.

Peter Force

National Portrait Gallery

Force

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Computer, Force & Bomb Load, 20th Air Force

National Air and Space Museum
Printed paper computer for force and bomb load

Centrifugal force demonstration

National Museum of American History

U. S. Air Force

National Museum of American History

U. S. Air Force

National Museum of American History

jacket, sinai peacekeeping force

National Museum of American History

lubricator, force feed

National Museum of American History

Centrifugal Force Apparatus

National Museum of American History
Benjamin Wofford (1780-1850) was a resident of Spartanburg, S.C. who bequeathed $100,000 to “establish a college of literary, classical and scientific education to be located in my native district and to be under the control of the Methodist Church of my native state.” When Wofford College opened in 1854, Prof. Warren DuPre was sent north to acquire scientific apparatus. He probably bought this centrifugal force apparatus at that time. The “Benj. Pike, Jr., 294 Broadway, New York” stamp on the frame is that of a leading purveyor of optical, mathematical and philosophical instruments. Pike termed this instrument “Centrifugal Hoops for showing the Earth an Oblate Spheroid.”

Ref: Benjamin Pike, Jr., Illustrated Descriptive Catalogue of Optical, Mathematical, and Philosophical Instruments (New York, 1856), vol. 1, pp. 117-118.

Juliana Force

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : silver gelatin ; 24 x 18 cm.

Juliana Force

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 25 x 21 cm. Force, seated and wearing an evening gown, looking away from the camera.
Identification on verso (handwritten): Juliana Force.

Juliana Force

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; image 33 x 27 on board 35 x 28 cm.

Bust portrait of Force, facing the camera.

Juliana Force

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 24 x 19 cm.

Identification on verso (handwritten): Mrs. Juliana Force, Possibly Woodstock Art Conference shortly before her death

Juliana Rieser Force

National Portrait Gallery

Life Force

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Depicts a partial abdomen covered by a black void, separated by a winding yellow measuring tape running from top to bottom right corner. Center text, in black: THE LIFE FORCE IS SEX...WELDON USES IT THE WAY A DAM BUILDER USES DYNAMITE - LOS ANGELES TIMES; below, in white: LIFE FORCES; in pink: FAY WELDON.

Eternal Force

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Expanding Force

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Life Force

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Air Force

National Air and Space Museum
Air Force. Framed multicolor illustrated print advertising the film "Air Force." Illustration occupies the upper right two-thirds of the print, depicting a plane on a runway before buildings in flames, with several people around the runway. Partial text top left in blue font, "A WARNER BROS. PICTURE." At bottom in large blue serif font, "Air Force", with the "i" dotted by a white star within a blue circle. Additional small print within the white border at bottom.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Air Force

National Air and Space Museum
Air Force. Framed red, white and blue illustrated print advertising the movie "Air Force." At center, "Air Force" in large white serif type. Below and at upper right, scenes from the film printed in black over a red background. Full Text: "Warner's Wonder Entertainment" in red sans-serif type with a white shield at top. At bottom in black, "A Howard A. Hawks Production-Produced by Hal B. Wallis, John Garfield, Gig Young, Harry Carey, George Tobias, Arthur Kennedy, James Brown, John Ridgely Original screen play by Dudley Nichols A Warner Bros. - First National Picture Copyright: Vitagraph Inc. "This advertising material is the property of Vitagraph, Inc. and is leased pursuant to an agreement which provides: "The exhibitor agrees that the advertising materials are leased for use only in conjunction with the exhibition at the theatre specified of the respective motion pictures identified in such materials and only for the purpose of properly advertising and exploiting said respective motion pictures at said theatre and the exhibitor agrees that he will not trade, sublease sell, give away or otherwise use or permit others to use such materials."

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Air Force

National Air and Space Museum
Photograph of bomber with crew loading bombs and officers rushing by, text at bottom

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Air Force

National Air and Space Museum
Photograph of bomber in front of burning building, anti-aircraft missiles in foreground, text at bottom

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.
1-24 of 69,027 Resources