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Oral history interview with Katherine Kalehuapuakeaula "Lehua" Domingo, 2010 April 24-25

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 126 pages

An interview of Katherine Kalehuapuakeaula "Lehua" Domingo conducted 2010 April 24 and 25, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Domingo's son's, Kalae Kilohana Domingo, home in Na'alehu, Hawaii.

Oral history interview with Jon Eric Riis, 2009 June 27-28

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 122 pages.

An interview of Jon Eric Riis conducted 2009 June 27-28, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Riis' home, in Atlanta, Georgia.

Oral history interview with Anne Wilson, 2012 July 6-7

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 98 pages.

An interview of Anne Wilson conducted 2012 July 6 and 7, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Wilson's home, in Evanston, Illinois.

Trude Jalowetz (Guermonprez)

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 39 x 30 cm.

Adela Akers in her studio

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 20 x 31 cm. Photo shows Akers seated at a table, working on a piece of fabric with a zig-zag pattern.
Identification on verso (handwritten): Adela Akers, Philadelphia, Pa.; working on proposal, 1990

Liberace Doormat

Archives of American Art
1 slide : col. ; 05 x 05 cm.

Photograph of doormat by Gyongy Laky.

Oral history interview with Helena Hernmarck, 2010 July 28- August 31

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 11 sound files (3 hr., 6 min.) digital, wav

Transcript: 85 pages

An interview of Helena Hernmarck conducted 2010 July 28 and August 31, by Matilda McQuaid, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Hernmarck's home and studio, in Ridgefield, Connecticut.

Oral history interview with Ted Hallman, 2006 May 23-2008 June 3

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 4 cassettes (3 hr., 42 min.) : analog

Transcript: 73 pages

An interview of Ted Hallman conducted 2006 May 23 and 2008 June 3, by Helen Drutt English, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Hallman's home, in Lederach, Pennsylvania.

Hallman speaks of working with transparent materials; teaching at Moore College and the Chicago Institute of Art; family influences in teaching and art; music and his art; interest in the body; traveling; shifts in modern textile art. Hallman also recalls Kenneth Mills, Ida Rolf, Alice Parrott, Michael Barnett, Claire Zeisler, Toshiko Takaezu, Maija Grotell, Aileen O. Webb, Nell Znamerowski, Karen Karnes, Lenore Tawney, and others.

Gyongy Laky at UC Berkeley

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w

Oral history interview with Alice Kagawa Parrott, 2005 July 10

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 32 pages.

An interview of Alice Kagawa Parrott conducted 2005 July 10, by Paul J. Smith, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Santa Fe, N.M.

Parrott speaks of her childhood in Hawaii; her extended family's fate in the atomic bombing at Hiroshima; her education at the University of Hawaii, The Cranbrook Academy of Art, and at the studio of Marguerite Wildenhain, at Pond Farm, in Guerneville, California; her teaching years at the University of New Mexico and on the island of Maui; her marriage to Alan Parrott in 1956; her travels in Mexico, Guatemala, and India; and her various exhibitions across the U.S. and abroad. She recalls Claude Horan, Hester Robinson, Ernestine Murai, Anna Kang Burgess, Toshiko Takaezu, Marianne Strengell, Maija Grotell, Jack Lenor Larsen, Rufino Tamayo, Isamu Noguchi, George Nakashima, Joan Mondale, and Aileen Osborne Webb, and others.

Oral history interview with Elisabeth Wildenhain, 1995 August 22

Archives of American Art
1 sound cassette (75 min.) : analog.

Transcript: 36 pages.

An interview with Elisabeth (Lili) Wildenhain conducted 1995 August 22, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art, in Wildenhain's home, Pittsford, N.Y.

Wildenhain talks about her childhood in a wealthy, cosmopolitan German-speaking family in Bohemia; her early interests and schooling; her work at the American Fine Arts and Monuments service; designing costumes and clothes in Kansas City following her first marriage; studying with Oskar Kokoschka; meeting Frans Wildenhain (who she subsequently married), travelling with him to Japan, and coming with him to Rochester, N.Y. where he taught at the School for American Craftsmen; and her problematic financial and health situation.

Oral history interview with Claire Zeisler, 1981 June

Archives of American Art
Transcript 43 pages

An interview of Claire Zeisler conducted 1981 June, by Dennis Barrie, for the Archives of American Art.

Fiber

National Museum of the American Indian

Oral history interview with Cynthia Schira, 2001 July 25-26

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 52 pages.

An interview of Cynthia Schira conducted 2001 July 25-26, by Margo Mensing, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Schira's home and studio, in Westport, N.Y.

Neda Al-Hilali with Black Passage installation

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm.

Oral history interview with Sheila Hicks, 2004 March 18

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 2 sound discs (1 hr., 44 min.) digital 2 5/8 in.

Transcript: 19 p.

An interview of Sheila Hicks conducted 2004 March 18, by Cristobal Zanartu, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Paris, France.

Hicks speaks of working outside of academia; working within the fiber art tradition; teaching classes and workshops; founding the MADESA design school in Cape Town, South Africa; the function of her works; the fluctuating art market; becoming a leader in the "soft art" movement; the role of textiles in society; how her work has changed during her career; and how she gets ideas for her pieces. Hicks also speaks of a typical day in her studio; her circle of friends in Paris; documenting her artwork through photographs; what she hopes to communicate through her works; maintaining notebooks during her career; and the influence of technology on her work.

Oral history interview with Adela Akers, 2008 March 4-6

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 113 pages.

An interview of Adela Akers conducted 2008 March 4-6, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Akers' studio, in Guerneville, California.

Akers speaks of her California studio; moving from Spain to Cuba at a young age; earning a degree in pharmacy before pursuing art at the Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois; her parents' businesses; struggling with English and becoming a citizen; the influence of architecture, geometry, and math in her work; her first big show at the American Craft Museum; working at Penland School of Crafts and Cranbrook Academy of Art; her several commissioned works; light and shadow in her accordion-shaped pieces; working with the Peace Corps and weaving in Peru; learning pre-Colombian weaving techniques; working on a commissioned project in Mexico with native weavers; experimenting with size and color in weaving; teaching at the Tyler School of Art; the influence of travel in her work; the qualities of jute, sisal, metal, and horsehair in weaving. Akers also recalls Cindy Cleary, Guido Llinas, Abelardo Estorino, Marianne Strengell, Ed Rossback, Glen Kaufman, Julia and Isiah Zagar, Joyce Chow, Katie and Billy Bernstein, Tom Suomalainen, Ron Garfinkel, Lee Nordness, Janet Taylor, Leora Stewart, Aron Siskin, Lewis Knauss, Agnes Martin, and others.

Oral history interview with Norma Minkowitz, 2001 September 17 and 2001 November 16

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 40 pages.

An interview of Norma Minkowitz conducted 2001 September 17 and 2001 November 16, by Patricia Malarcher, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Minkowitz's home in Westport, Connecticut.

Minkowitz speaks of her early childhood and what it was like growing up in a musical household in which her father was a concert pianist, her grandfather a composer, and her uncle a violinist; her relative's escape from Russia before the Russian revolution, how her parents met and what life in the Bronx was like; her relationships with different family members, specifically how close she was to her mother throughout her life; her first crocheting experience, making doilies with her mother; how she was drawn to drawing; her education in art, attendance at the Music and Art High School and then Cooper Union; her most rewarding experience at Cooper Union with her two-dimensional teacher Stefano Cusamano; her first paid job as a book illustrator for a children's dictionary; making designs to send to Woman's Day and Family Circle after the birth of her second child in 1963; the difference between a fiber artist and a craftsperson, trying to distinguish herself as an artist and how she would like to be recognized on a fine arts level; how time consuming making "wearables" or clothing was; the galleries she exhibited at including Elements in New York; her shows at the American Craft Museum, curator Paul Smith; the different museums where her work has been displayed including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Connecticut, the De Young Memorial Museum in San Francisco and the Kwang Ju Museum in Korea; her teaching experiences at the various craft schools; her different experiments within her work and how her work has changed since she began in the 1960s; her different studio spaces and how most times she can work right on her lap; how her children became artists; the meaning of several works to her and how viewers could interpret them differently, specifically, "Get Thee Up" and "Goodbye Mother;" how much home means to her; the many different pieces she has collected by other artists, including John McQueen, Richard Devore, and Ruth Duckworth; her other activities including running in three New York Marathons; how she has bronzed two pieces and what that was like; her four grandchildren, and making art and being a successful grandmother at the same time. Minkowitz also recalls Andrea Miller-Keller, Magdalena Abakanowicz, Lenore Tawney, Sheila Hicks, Alex Katz, Kathleen Whitney, Pat Hickman and others.

Oral history interview with Ferne Jacobs, 2005 August 30-31

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 84 pages.

An interview of Ferne Jacobs conducted 2005 August 30-31, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the artist's home and studio, in Los Angeles, California.

Jacobs discusses her early childhood in Chicago and her family's move to Los Angeles; her parents' emigration from Europe; her parents' involvement with the Chicago Club in Los Angeles; her earliest experience with art at a Van Gogh exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; her fascination with drawing at an early age; her first art classes with Ron Blumberg, during her senior year of high school; entering in the Art Center College of Design; getting married and moving to New York; working in the handbag department of Bonwit Teller and taking classes at the Pratt Institute; her later education at various institutions, including California State University in San Diego, Claremont Graduate University, and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle, Maine.; her first meeting with Dominic di Mare in San Francisco; her first meeting with Lenore Tawney in New York; her first foray off the loom at the behest of Arline M. Fisch; her first show at Galleria del Sol in Santa Barbara, California; her second show at the Fairtree Gallery in New York where Paul Smith, curator of the Museum of Contemporary Craft (now the Museum of Arts & Design) first saw her work; being included, along with Lenore Tawney, in the First World Craft exhibition in Toronto in 1967; her travels to Cape Cod, where she vacations annually, and to Italy; her aversion to all things technological; her recent experience learning to read the Torah; her work, including Tide (2005), Container for a Wind (1974), and Wind (2004); her interest in Carl Jung; addressing timelessness and duality in her work; various fiber techniques including twining, coiling, and knotting; her relationship with her son Peter and daughter Naomi; her relationship with dealers and galleries, including the Sybaris Gallery and the Snyderman Gallery; and the inspiration for her work that she finds in nature.

Jacobs also recalls Gabriel Laderman, Mary Jane Leland, Olga de Amaral, Peter Collingwood, Jack Lenor Larsen, Kay Sekimachi, Joan Austin, Magdalena Abakanowicz, Neda Al-Hilali, Marilyn Pappas, Patsy Krebs, Vija Celmins, Claire Delmar, Ken Price, Ron Nagle, Roland Reese, Fred Tomaselli, Agnes Martin, Francis Sumner Merritt, Joanne Rapp, Nancy Margolis, Kate Anderson, and others.

Oral history interview with Mary Merkel-Hess, 2010 August 24-25

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 5 sound files (4 hr., 11 min.) digital, wav

Transcript: 86 pages

An interview of Mary Merkel-Hess conducted 2010 August 24 and 25, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Merkel-Hess' home, in Iowa City, Iowa.

Mary Merkel-Hess speaks of growing up in the rural Midwest; deciding pursue an artistic career; studying philosophy at Marquette University and earning an MFA the University of Wisconsin-Madison; becoming part of the art community in Iowa City; beginning her artistic career in metalsmithing and later transitioning into fiber mediums; using basketry and papermaking methods along with a variety of materials to devise original techniques; the role of light, balance, juxtaposition in her fiber sculptures; working from both natural and human impacted landscapes; traveling extensively through Europe and Japan; attending the Armory Show and SOFA Santa Fe; interacting with galleries such as Browngrotta Art Gallery and Olson-Larsen Galleries; completing public and residential commissions; supporting herself through the sale of her work. Mary Merkel-Hess also recalls Chungi Choo, Heikki Seppä, Tim Barrett, Alma Eikerman, Shereen LaPlantz, Jack Lenor Larsen, Tom Grotta, Marlene Olson, Wendy Haas, Katie Gingrass and others.

Oral history interview with Sheila Hicks, 2004 February 3-March 11

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 75 pages

An interview of Sheila Hicks conducted 2004 February 3-March 11, by Monique Levi-Strauss, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Paris, France.

Hicks speaks of her family and growing up in various cities; taking classes at the Detroit Institute of Arts; studying art at Syracuse University; spending a summer painting in Taxco, Mexico; transferring to Yale University to study painting; receiving a Fulbright grant to study in Chile; traveling through South America; painting and becoming part of the Chilean artist circle; returning to Yale for a Masters of Fine Arts; moving to Mexico to pursue photography; marrying Henrik Tati Schlubach; being awarded a grant to study in France; discovering a love for Paris and making textiles; meeting other artists in Mexico; taking her early textile pieces to the Museum of Modern Art; getting a contract with Knoll Associates; moving to Paris; meeting and marrying fellow artist Enrique Zañartu; making connections with European artists; creating large scale textiles for architects and designing for spaces; exhibiting at the Lausanne Biennale of Tapestry; opening a studio and hiring employees; the challenges of commissions; creating three-dimensional pieces; visiting other artists' studios; choosing materials and techniques; managing the magazine, "American Fabrics;" her tenure as art director for the King Saud University in Saudi Arabia; the process of making a project in her studio; working in carpet workshops in Morocco; using hospital linen in her sculpture; working on commissions in Japan; teaching; and having her work recognized as art. Hicks also recalls Josef and Anni Albers, Rico Lebrun, Luis Barragan, Claire Zeisler, Lenore Tawney, Mildred Constantine, Mathias Goeritz, and others.

Oral history interview with Kay Sekimachi [Stocksdale], 2001 July 26-August 6

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 59 pages.

An interview of Kay Sekimachi [Stocksdale] conducted 2001 July 26-August 6, by Suzanne Baizerman, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Sekimachi's home in Berkeley, California.

Sekimachi speaks of her family and early childhood in Berkeley; a trip to Japan when she was four, during which her older brother died of dysentery; what it was like growing up in a Japanese community in Berkeley; the death of her father when she was ten years old; learning Japanese culture through her mother's cooking and traditions; the relocation of her family during WWII; learning to paint and draw at the relocation center in Tanforan; moving to Utah, then Cincinnati before finally returning to Berkeley; her trip to Japan in 1974 and how it felt like she really belonged there, and falling in love with the Japanese aesthetic; trips to London, and consequently meeting Ann Sutton and Peter Collingwood; studying and working with Trude Guermonprez; teaching for Mary Woodard Davis in Santa Fe, N.M.; her first trip to Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle, Maine.; how the community groups and guilds provided support and many friendships, including Claire Weaver; some of the magazines she subscribes to, and the numerous books that influenced her during her career, by Anni Albers, Mary Atwater, and others; how her work started out as functional and gradually became non-functional; the many different types of her artwork, monofilament, paper bowls, and hornets nests; the limitations of the loom, and learning to experiment with fiber; difficulty of selling her craft; the numerous places she has exhibited and sold her work, including but not limited to Local Color, Nanny's (both in San Francisco), the Mint Museum in Charlotte, N.C., the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, and Brown Grotta Gallery in Wilton, Connecticut; how she doesn't like to deal with agents, and dealers; her marriage to Bob Stocksdale; her studio and the studio of her husband; all of the artwork in her dining room and living room area; and how she is still weaving, but is not as frequent in her studio because she has been taking care of Bob. Sekimachi also recalls Kenneth Trapp, Marguerite Wildenhain, Lee Nordness, Loiuse Allrich, Jack Lenor Larsen, Dominic DiMare, and others.

Staged Stories Renwick Craft Invitational 2009 Artists' Roundtable

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Ceramic artist Christyl Boger, fiber artist Mark Newport, glass artist Mary Van Cline, and ceramic artist SunKoo Yuh discuss their visions on this Artists' Roundtable moderated by Kate Bonansinga.

Oral history interview with Michael James, 2003 January 4-5

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 91 pages.

An interview of Michael James conducted 2003 January 4-5, by Patricia Harris and David Lyon, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Lincoln, Nebraska.

James speaks of his childhood in New Bedford, Massachusetts, in a large Catholic French-Canadian family; his parochial school experience; the early influence of French language and textiles; his undergraduate studies at Southeastern Massachusetts University and graduate studies at Rochester Institute of Technology in painting and printmaking; his first exposure to the craft world; transitioning from painting to quilts while starting a family; his first teaching jobs and shift to self employment; he discusses his books Quiltmaker's Handbook I and II; being male in the women's world of quiltmaking; he comments on the importance of fiber as a means of expression; his artistic influences; his 1990 residency in Switzerland; creating fabrics by hand-painting and digital printing; representational imagery in his work and themes; commissions; the impact of religion, spirituality, mortality, politics and social issues on his quilts; his working environment in Somerset, Massachusetts, and Lincoln, Nebraska; teaching at the University of Nebraska, and the International Quilt Study Center there; his wife Judy and her art; quiltmakers inside and outside academia; the value of quilts as "art"; crafts schools; his involvement in national and regional craft organizations; his early exhibitions; his relationships with dealers; the state of the art market; the lack of critical reception in the quiltmaking field; his own writings; how American fiber arts rank on an international scale; and new uses of technology in his work. He also recalls Jon Gnagy, Donald Krueger, Susan Russo, Faith Ringgold, Mickey Lawler, Ulysses Dietz, Robert and Ardis James, Florence Dionne, Lois Martin, Diane Itter, Hilda Raz, and others.
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