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Environmental Detectives 2015

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Summer campers entering grades fifth and sixth became nature sleuths at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, solving environmental mysteries, fostering team-building skills aboard canoes, hiking, and learning about biodiversity in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Video created by summer 2015 education intern Josie Whelan. Music: Heartland by Silent Partner.

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center building during open house.

Artists and Environmental Sustainability: Video Art, Ecology and the Work of Paul Ryan

Smithsonian Education
Duncan takes us to the intersections of art, communications, and ecology. He discusses the emergence of video as a medium and how it has been heralded by artists such as Paul Ryan as a visual tool for "scoring" the environment and eliciting community participation in issues of sustainability. Presented by: Charles Duncan Collections Specialist Archives of American Art Original Airdate: September 30, 2009 You can stay connected with the Smithsonian's upcoming online events and view a full collection of past sessions on a variety of topics.: http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/educators/events/online_events.html

Marine Ecology--2017 Citizen Science Newsletter

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
The Marine & Estuarine Ecology Lab at SERC studies interactions among species and the ways that individual animals, communities and ecosystems respond to changes in the environment. Videos by Cosette Larash, Maria Sharova, Alison Cawood Music: Positive by AShamaluev https://www.youtube.com/user/AShamaluev/about

Field Ecology: Leaping from a Mullet Skiff

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
With its motor near the front, the mullet skiff is an oddity. Why place a motor here? It leaves the back open for working an enormous seine net—something ecologists use to trap and study fish in Chesapeake Bay. Here, ecologists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center launch a 200-foot seine net along a Chesapeake marsh. First, the boat captain scans the marsh for a suitable spot. A net runner uses ninja-like skills to quietly jump off the stern and secure one end of the net on the shore, while the captain speeds the skiff away, arcing around the marsh. As the skiff arcs back towards shore, the captain cranks the steering wheel and throttles down. The second net runner then jumps off the shore and quickly runs the other end of the net to shore, entrapping the fish. Timing and agility are important skills for the second net runner. Leaping off a moving boat into water that instantly stops your momentum while managing the unwieldy net is no easy feat— envision "walking" an 80-pound Golden Retriever that is determined to chase a squirrel! There have been some epic wipeouts, but all you can do is pop up and run as fast as you can to shore, splashing the entire way to prevent the fish from escaping.

Artists and Environmental Sustainability: Video Art, Ecology and the Work of Paul Ryan

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Webinar in which Smithsonian archivist Charles Duncan discusses the emergence of video as a medium and how it has been used by such environmentally minded artists as Paul Ryan.

Community ecology of salamanders (review)

Smithsonian Libraries
None

Environmental “Forensics” Pieces Together Mysterious Phragmites Invasion

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
by Chris Patrick On crime scene investigation shows, DNA forensic scientists sit in a darkened room, wearing lab coats and clutching clear vials over dramatic music. In a matter of hours, they conjure perpetrators to the scene of a crime or prove relations between separated kin simply from remnants of genetic material. Researchers in the […]

A Crossword Puzzle with Ecology Flair

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Enjoy our Smithsonian science-based crossword puzzle in celebration of Crossword Day. Words for this puzzle were derived from our blog posts in 2015. Stumped? Search our blog posts for additional clues or click the Reveal Letter button for help. Good luck and may the force be with you! Online version: http://crossword.info/Soulenfish/Ecology_Flair_Final        

Ecology of freshwater tidal wetlands

Smithsonian Libraries
None

Environmental Button

National Museum of American History
The Everglades is an extensive subtropical marshland in southern Florida. Marjory Stoneman Douglas, author of the 1947 book The Everglades: River of Grass, was influential in educating the public on the importance of this unique ecological area. The Everglades is still one of the nation’s biggest environmental battlegrounds as a result of ongoing fights over water use and distribution. Over 50% of its original area has been lost to agriculture and development.

Environmental Button

National Museum of American History
This button depicts the ecology symbol, a small letter “e” inside the larger letter “O,” the letters standing for “environment” and “organism.” Cartoonist Ron Cobb invented the symbol in 1969. The ecology symbol appeared in a green U.S. flag for the first time in the April 21, 1970 issue of Look magazine.

Environmental Button

National Museum of American History
The first Earth Day was held on April 22, 1970. The occasion was first conceived by Gaylord Nelson, a U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, as a national day of observance for environmental problems. Millions of people participated in events across the country, while thousands of schools held special educational sessions, all dealing with environmental concerns. Earth Day has since become an annual event, celebrated worldwide.

Environmental Button

National Museum of American History
The first Earth Day was held on April 22, 1970. The occasion was first conceived by Gaylord Nelson, a U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, as a national day of observance for environmental problems. Millions of people participated in events across the country, while thousands of schools held special educational sessions, all dealing with environmental concerns. Earth Day has since become an annual event, celebrated worldwide.

Environmental Button

National Museum of American History
The first Earth Day was held on April 22, 1970. The occasion was first conceived by Gaylord Nelson, a U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, as a national day of observance for environmental problems. Millions of people participated in events across the country, while thousands of schools held special educational sessions, all dealing with environmental concerns. Earth Day has since become an annual event, celebrated worldwide.

Environmental Button

National Museum of American History
The slogan on this button refers to a campaign by the environmental group the Sierra Club to promote and preserve the wilderness areas of Utah. It dates from the early 1990s. Wilderness protection was a touchstone issue among some environmental groups, and is still relevant despite the passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964.

Environmental Button

National Museum of American History
The first Earth Day was held on April 22, 1970. The occasion was first conceived by Gaylord Nelson, a U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, as a national day of observance for environmental problems. Millions of people participated in events across the country, while thousands of schools held special educational sessions, all dealing with environmental concerns. Earth Day has since become an annual event, celebrated worldwide.

Environmental Button

National Museum of American History
The slogan on this button is a humorous take-off on the well-known “save the whales” buttons, which were popular in the mid-1970s to the 1980s.

Environmental Button

National Museum of American History
On March 24, 1989 the oil tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground in Prince William Sound, off the coast of Alaska. Almost 11 million gallons of crude oil spilled into the sea, the largest oil spill in United States history. The resulting oil slick contaminated 1,300 miles of coastline and killed over 200,000 sea birds and sea mammals such as otters, seals, and killer whales. The clean-up cost over 2.2 billion dollars.

Environmental disasters are often used to galvanize public support for reform; the Exxon Valdez accident is a perfect example. This button was produced to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the event.
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