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Found 23,997 Resources

pen, quill

National Museum of American History

doll

National Museum of American History

Life

National Museum of American History

jack straws game

National Museum of American History

"Indian domestic life in the Pawnee village"

National Anthropological Archives
The item is number 311 of the series Views of the Rocky Mountains and Vicinity. Men and women are pictured standing outside a dwelling.

Story of A Life

National Museum of American History

Checkered Game of Life

National Museum of American History

Exhibit Case of Domestic Artifacts from Colonial Life in America

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Exhibit case in the Arts and Industries Building of domestic artifacts, possibly the Copp Collection of colonial life in America. Exhibited are basketry, musical instruments, furnishings, harnesses, and bowls.

Exhibit Case of Domestic Artifacts from Colonial Life in America

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Exhibit case of domestic artifacts, possibly the Copp Collection of colonial life, on display in the Arts and Industries Building. Exhibited are basketry, musical instruments, furnishings, harnesses, and bowls.

The Grounds of a Holy Life ...

National Museum of American History

The Tree of Life

National Museum of American History
Colored print of a large tree of life. "New Jerusalem" is depicted in the background behind the tree. In the foreground is a crowd of people representing this present "Evil World". Two quotations from scripture appear beneath the title.

Memoirs of the Life of Catherine Phillips

National Museum of American History

Life in the Woods

National Museum of American History
Black on blue canvas print; scene of five hunters and three dogs camping along the wooded banks of a river. One hunter is tending a fire, one holds a dead bird, one is kneeling beside a dead stag preparing to skin it. A fourth hunter is waving his hat to two fishermen in a boat and a fifth hunter is reclining against a tree, waving a flask.

The Life & Age of Woman

National Museum of American History
Colored print depicting a female at different stages from infancy to old age. The figures are depicted on ascending steps to middle age and then descend with old age being the lowest to the right. There are verses beneath each figure and vignettes that symbolize various stages of life. A small vignette of two people standing beside a man digging a grave is in the center foreground.

The Life & Age of Woman

National Museum of American History
Colored print depicting a female at different stages from infancy to old age. The figures are depicted on ascending steps to middle age and then descend with old age being the lowest to the right. There are verses beneath each figure and vignettes that symbolize various stages of life. A small vignette of two people standing beside a man digging three graves is in the center foreground.

The Life & Age of Man

National Museum of American History
Colored print depicting a male from infancy to old age in decade spans. The figures are depicted on ascending steps to 50 and then they descend with 100 being the lowest to the right. Verses beneath each figure associate a depicted animal with that stage of life. In the lower center is a small vignette of three men drinking at a table while a young man and women walk away in what appears to be a cemetary. The devil gestures between the the two groups.

Scenes in a Miners Life

National Museum of American History
Black and white print on blue paper depicting six views of a miners life. "Night in the Log Cabin", "Camping Out", "Going to work", "Hole gives out", "New diggings Struck", and "Next Day". This is an unused folded letter sheet with the image on its first page.

The Grounds of a Holy Life

National Museum of American History
Hugh Turford’s The Grounds of a Holy Life was published by J. Babcock of Hartford, Connecticut in 1800. The 120 page book also contained Paul’s speech to the Bishop of Cretia, as well as homilies on the tests of Christianity. The book was a conversion treatise that described the way that heathens came to be renowned Christians, and how similar sinners may be converted to sainthood with the help of a little preaching. The Copp Collection contains about 150 books of early American imprint and shows a wide range of reading matter typical of a New England Puritan family living in a port town. Literacy was expected of many New Englanders, as Puritan doctrine required everyone to read the Bible. The abundance of multiple Bibles, psalms, hymnodies, sermons, and morality tales reflects the Copp’s religious beliefs. Other highlights of the library include the works of Shakespeare, almanacs, historical and political texts, and travel narratives. The Copp Collection contains a variety of household objects that the Copp family of Connecticut used from around 1700 until the mid-1800s. Part of the Puritan Great Migration from England to Boston, the family eventually made their home in New London County, Connecticut, where their textiles, clothes, utensils, ceramics, books, bibles, and letters provide a vivid picture of daily life. More of the collection from the Division of Home and Community Life can be viewed by searching accession number 28810.

Domestic Boiler Patent Model

National Museum of American History
Full-size patent model (U.S. Patent No. 150,222) of a domestic boiler, made by Ernest B. Beaumont of Ann Arbor, MI, and patented on April 28, 1874. Consists of a wire-rimmed, lipped, conical cup with a hinged flat lid and braced triangular strap handle soldered to a small, shallow fuel pan on a conical, wire-edged base. Hinges for lid and handle are perpendicular to one another with lip opposite lid hinge; handle can fold inside the cup or on top of lid when in use to prevent it from getting hot. Folded vertical seams. No marks. Three darkened paper tags stored with object are printed and handwritten with patent information.

Quilt made from gray, black, brown, blue, and red suiting samples

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A tied quilt made from suiting fabrics in muted tones of gray, black, brown, blue, and red machine sewn together. The pieces are all of uniform rectangular size, suggesting they are from a salesman's sample or swatch book. The quilt is backed with a gray and cream striped wool cotton blend fabric that is turned over at the edges and then sewn around the turned edges of the top. There is no additional border or binding. There is no batting between the pieced top and the backing fabric. The top and backing are attached with red yarn ties placed at the center and the corners of each block on the top.

Red, blue, and cream embroidered bedcover

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A red, blue, and cream pieced bedcover with botanic and geometric embroidered designs. The forty-two (42) blocks are sewn together in six (6) columns and seven (7) rows with alternating colors of red, cream, and blue squares made of a rayon and cotton blend cloth. Each block has a design of floral or leafy sprigs, or geometric shapes, embroidered on it in cream, pale gold, and pale pink silk thread. The blocks are hand-pieced together with decorative embroidery stitched over the seams. Some blocks are made from more than one piece of fabric, with decorative stitching over the seams in the blocks as well. Each block is backed with light weight cotton canvas, with the embroidery sewn through the canvas and the facing fabric. There is no batting between the top and the backing fabrics, with the only inner material being the canvas. The back has three different striped fabrics, one is cream, blue, brown, and yellow; the second is cream, pale blue, and brown; the third is blue and cream. The top and back are seamed right sides together, then turned and a line of machine-stitched cream thread is sewn around approximately 1/2 inch in from the edge. A strip of Velcro is sewn across the top of the reverse. An additional small rectangle of Velcro is sewn at the proper left bottom reverse corner.

Scrap quilt made by Elizabeth Salter Smith

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A quilted bedcover made with printed and woven scrap fabrics by Elizabeth Salter Smith. The individual scraps are a variety of geometric shapes including squares, rectangles, triangles, and parallelograms. All of the scraps are hand pieced together, including an apparent additional horizontal strip along the top edge of the bedcover. The fabrics represent common dress prints and shirtings available in the second half of the nineteenth century, including novelty shirtings depicting anchors and horses. The quilt contains cotton batting and is backed with a cream, black, and gold plaid cotton flannel. The backing is turned to the front and hand stitched to make binding. However, the top edge of the binding is a black printed abstract design that has been both hand and machine sewn from back to front. The bedcover is hand quilted with white cotton thread in a scallop or fan design. A fabric label is sewn at the back proper right corner with handwritten ink reading "WHITLEY 3 / 97 1/2" l x 83" w". A strip of Velcro is sewn along the back top edge.

Cream and red appliqued quilted bedcover

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A cream and red appliqued quilted bedcover made from plain cotton fabrics. The top consists of twelve (12) blocks sewn together by hand and decorated with a geometric design using turned hand applique. Each block contains a circle in the center surrounded by four (4) diamonds that have blunt long tips. Crosses are appliqued over the center of the seams that join the blocks, with additional crosses in the spaces between the diamonds around the outer edge. The blocks are bordered by a panel of the repeating blunt-tipped diamonds around all sides. The quilt is bound with the red fabric by hand. A layer of cotton batting is placed between the top and the backing fabric. The top, batting, and backing are joined with quilted stitches in cream thread that surround each applique shape in two rows.

Blue, black, gray, and brown bedcover made from suiting samples

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A bedcover made from suiting fabrics in muted tones of blue, gray, black, brown, and burgundy hand sewn together with red thread using a herringbone stitch. The pieces are all of uniform rectangular size, suggesting they are from a salesman's sample or swatch book. The bedcover is backed with a peach, blue, and cream woven plaid cotton, which is turned to the front and hand stitched to form the binding. There is no batting between the pieced top and the backing fabric. The bedcover is not quilted or tied, the top and back are only attached along the binding edge. A muslin sleeve is hand sewn to the back along one side.
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