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Found 4 Collections

 

Science and Technology - Edo Japan

This collection is meant to be used in the midst of a unit of Edo Japan. Through the study of new technologies and scientific advances at the time, students can further dive into the Edo national dynamics by means of the developments in science. This module on science and technology is geared towards understanding Edo Japan through inventions and progress other than in the arts, and in unison with the rest of the world, therefore opening discussion as to how closed the country really was. 

Numerous technologies are tightly linked to cultural expressions such as theater arts and the ukiyo-e , and therefore, a separate series of lessons on arts and culture during the Edo Period is absolutely necessary following or preceding this lesson. A study of the Edo culture remains a common approach to explore the society in Edo Japan; the study of science and new technologies compliments this analysis, and it will facilitate engaging a wider audience. 

The artifacts listed here provide illustrations of cross-cultural developments and technological inventions before the end of the Edo period. Through these resources, the teacher can focus on medical advances, particular inventions such as the Montgolfière or simple robots, greater historical processes such as industrialization or everyday objects such as hairpins and cloth, which were also part of the exchange of ideas. 

Analyzing these technological commonalities between Japan and the greater global arena, will provide context for the later discussion of ‘rangaku’ (Dutch studies) during the Edo period. 


Lesson plan (2-4 hours) 

1. Make the resources and artwork available to the students in preparation for the lesson at least one day ahead of class. These artifacts and texts will serve as a pre-research idea bank and starting point. 

2. Teacher can briefly present the material available and prepare a quick lecture or discussion presenting a general overview of science in Japan at the time, or sciences in the world during the same period (e.g. main inventions and discoveries, scientific leaders and award winners, revolutions in science such as the Industrial Revolution.) The lecture could include a brief overview of the state of the social sciences around the world, as well (e.g. theories in psychology, birth of sociology, main theories in anthropology.)

3. Lead the routine "Claim/Support/Question" using the resource "Ukie Edo Nihonbashi Odawaracho uoichi no zu." Discuss the main issues and talking points that surfaced during the routine; tie in the results of the routine with the keywords presented in Step 2. 

4. Students explore on their own the resources in the collection and decide on a topic that they would like to research further. A few ideas are: automated technologies, advances in medicine, technology of daily-life objets or technology in the arts. Teacher can also provide research support to guide students into the collection's reading, such as scaffolded questions or a diagram to lead to their preferred topic. 

5. Students research the topic of their choice and prepare 10-20 minute presentations on the topic. The goal and format of the presentations can also be defined in class (e.g. slideshow, written piece, a draft for a longer essay, a design technology project...) 


Extension activity

At the end of the lesson on Edo culture and science, create a newspaper that covers the main events of the Edo period. Students can write pieces on the area of their choice: politics, science and technology, arts and culture, or even a column on daily life. Teacher can define the word limit and format, topics covered, and members of each newspaper. After editing and correcting the articles, they can be arranged as a real newspaper. The resources in this collection serve as primary and secondary sources for the activity. 

*PDF of examples is attached in the collection.

Denise Rodriguez
13
 

STEAM Learning: Beauty and Truth in Science and Art

Overview: Within the new realm of STEAM learning, students explore transdisciplinary themes connecting Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math in new ways, finding similarities and differences.  The overall goal of STEAM learning is to link the subjects for 21st century career paths.

Use this lesson as a provocation to a unit on planet Earth, our solar system, and/or space and the human interaction within those topics. This will get students thinking about how we translate the world around us and motivate them to dig deep when researching.

Use the thinking routine: Beauty and Truth for an engaging discussion with students. The discussions will help you assess students’ prior knowledge of space, Earth, and our solar system.

Purpose:  In this lesson students explore their knowledge of science and art. Students are asked to make connections with the two as they use a Project Zero thinking routine: Beauty and Truth. This lesson can be adapted to students Grades 5-12 to work collaboratively and enhance their communication skills within the regular classrooms or Design Thinking and Maker Space learning workshops when available.

History connections: This collection offers a historical perspective of the synergistic role of art and sciences for innovations used for human exploration both on Earth and in space. The images and artifacts have been selected to capture science and art from the early 20th century to current times.

Directions: In order to allow student led learning, model the activity (described below), then allow the students to explore the activity. The very last resource in the collection is a video entitled “Heaven and Earth”. Use this as a tool for a reflection discussion in the beginning and end of your lesson. Please feel free to modify the lesson. Note that it is imperative to discuss Science and Art before and after the lesson to show the growth of understanding from beginning to end. 

A sample discussion to get students thinking about how to describe art and science can use the following questions: "Where do you see art in these images? What, to you, makes it "art"? Where do you see science? What, to you makes it "science"? Let's look deeper, could you say that what you thought was art could have aspects of science? What could make it science? And now the opposite, could you say that what you thought was science could have aspects of art? What could make it art?" As a teacher, document the descriptions on the board for the students to see the words they are using. Create a Venn diagram of the words used, each circle being science or art with the overlap being similar descriptions. Use your personal style to dig deep in the discussion, working on the students' abilities to communicate effectively and with metaphors. Highlight when they use powerful metaphors or challenge them to make associations when speaking to best express themselves. 

Teacher will demonstrate a sample first: Choose two images (Art and Science): one that you think best demonstrates concepts in science that you are interested in and one that best demonstrates art concepts that you are interested in.  Please explore the artifact by exploring the tabs that display more information about the piece. 

The teacher demonstrates the thinking routine to analyze the images: Beauty and Truth. Document both beauty and truth evidence for each image. Compare the list and see if there are similarities. Then the students pair up to do the same: choose two images and explore Beauty and Truth for each image. Have them chart using 4 squares to get the beauty and truth observations for each of the two images. After, share out their findings and have a reflection discussion for any similarities amongst students. The main goal is to have the students realize on their own that science and art overlap in many ways, and that beauty and truth can be extracted from each. 

The purpose of first exploring science vs. art and then beauty and truth is to increase the sophistication of the discussion and students' abilities to communicate effectively and clearly. After all four words are analyzed for the two images, students will have both exercised their communicative abilities and their reasoning of the world around us created and real. This challenges their point of view of the world around them and calibrates their critical reasoning skills. 

This should lead some rich discussions as well as powerful creative expression and scientific reasoning. These are the skills that students need to analyze the world around them to further extend their STEM skills and best prepare for the 21st century workforce. Take your time to use this as a platform for discussion in your classroom and continue to have student discuss their perceptions of the world. 

Learning Integrations:

  • Literacy: Have the students write a persuasive paragraph that promotes either of the images as more beauty or truth with multiple reasons why and concrete examples to demonstrate.
  • Science: Have the students research more about the science they observed. You can even combine literacy by having them complete a technical article where they place themselves within that time period of the scientific discovery and write a “Breaking News” article telling the general public about the amazing new science discovery.
  • History: Create a timeline for 5-10 images. Discuss the progression of discovery and innovation. Discuss the impact on society and humans.

Learning Extensions:

  • Use design thinking to extend the learning. Pretend there will be a circus coming to town that gets everyone excited about STEAM. Use graphic design tools to combine both images and create a promotional poster.
  • Create a model or diorama of the scientific discovery.

Let the learning take you on an STEAM adventure.

Enjoy this lesson!

Ages: Grades 5-12, scope per ability

Learning objectives:

  • Students understand the similarities and differences of science and art.
  • Students learn historic scientific discoveries.
  • NGSS - Use these objectives after using this lesson as a provocation to learn about our Earth, the Universe, and the solar system. Sample science units can include the following learning standards:
    • MS-ESS1-2 Earth's Place in the Universe

    • Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.  Grade: Middle School (6-8)
    • HS-ESS1-1 Earth's Place in the Universe

    • Develop a model based on evidence to illustrate the life span of the sun and the role of nuclear fusion in the sun’s core to release energy that eventually reaches Earth in the form of radiation.  Grade: High School (9-12)
    • HS-ESS1-2 Earth's Place in the Universe

    • Construct an explanation of the Big Bang theory based on astronomical evidence of light spectra, motion of distant galaxies, and composition of matter in the universe.  Grade: High School (9-12)

Cultural Connections - Global Perspectives

  • Investigating the world: With prompting and support, I can ask a question about an idea that is important to my community.
  • Recognizing perspectives: With prompting and support, I can identify when someone else has an idea that is different from my own.
  • Communicate Ideas: I can speak and write to share my ideas with others. This means with help I can look at my audience, speak loudly and clearly, and share my ideas so that my audience can understand them.

#GoGlobal #STEAM #STEM #designthinking #makeractivity

Sandra Vilevac
47
 

Investigating Clean Water

In this collection, originally used with 4th graders, students investigate how people access clean water both globally and locally. Students will use Agency by Design thinking routines to explore watersheds as a system, focusing on the Anacostia Watershed & the larger Chesapeake Bay Watershed. They will then use observational drawings and make their own model watershed to deepen their understanding. 

Students will use Project Zero Thinking Routines to take the perspective of those who live in water scarce areas and be invited to conduct their own research of a region that faces physical or economic water scarcity. Students will be encouraged to take action by creating a public service announcement explaining an issue related to clean water or by designing their own solution.

This collection contains 10 images of showing the gathering, carrying, filtering of, and lack of clean water. It has maps that show water scarcity on a global scale, and maps and diagrams of local (to Washington, D.C.) watersheds. It contains several thinking routines that can be used to examine the works as well as guide students to notice complexity. It also contains links to several articles, videos and an interactive game that students can use to  conduct research on issues of water scarcity. 


#GoGlobal 


Marissa Werner
36
 

Exploring Plate Tectonics

This student activity introduces students to plate tectonics, volcanoes, earthquakes, rocks, and fossils through selected Smithsonian images, diagrams, videos, articles and activities supplemented with additional instructional materials. Features of this collection have been included or designed to spark excitement by teaching students through different forms of media. The sorting activities (see pink and white tile at the end of the collection) let students play the roles of archaeologists, anthropologists, and curators by sorting rocks and fossils based on age. At the conclusion of the activity, students will be able to think critically about how cities prepare for volcanoes and earthquakes by answering questions about current events.

STUDENT INSTRUCTIONS:

If there is a paper clip on the left side of the slide, click on it and follow instructions.

Tags: archaeology, anthropology, margins, subduction, hotspot, oceanic, crust, continental, rift, transform, shield, spreading, ridge, trench

Christina Shepard
26