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Reading Bones: Kalmyk Cultural Symbolism

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
A process of cultural renewal and linguistic revival is taking place in Kalmykia, Russia, home to the westernmost group of Mongolic peoples. Nyamin Songajieyavich Manjieyev and Nina Kochayevna Manjieyeva speak both Kalmyk and Russian to describe the symbolic importance of sheep bones. Linguist Gregory D.S. Anderson translates, explaining how certain features of the bones symbolize facets of the Kalmyk worldview. Videography by Sara Legg, Michael Headley and Sam Wharton Editing by Sara Legg [Catalog No. CFV10572; Copyright 2013 Smithsonian Institution]

A Reunion of Ancient Cultural Roots

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Growing up in China, the word “reunion” (tuan ju 团聚) always reminded me of a crowded, cozy, and chatty occasionRead More

Painting Peru: Cultural Identity in Murals

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
In developing the Perú: Pachamama program, the curatorial team crisscrossed the country, from the urban scenes of Lima and IquitosRead More

Cross-Cultural Connections at the Festival

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Before beginning my internship with the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, I could not have imagined what aRead More

Cultural Landscapes Shaping the Peru Program

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
The Peru program for the 2015 Folklife Festival has taken a more definite shape since we returned from our secondRead More

QR Codes in Cultural Education: Are They Worth It?

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Have you noticed the black and white patterned squares on signs and advertisements, offering more information? These are quick responseRead More

Cultural Sustainability and Traditional Crafts in Bhutan

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
In the mountains of central Bhutan, a small group of craftspeople are struggling to sustain traditional practices that are disappearingRead More

Intangible Cultural Heritage, Within Reach

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Countless times throughout the Festival as I walked through the One World, Many Voices site, I couldn’t help but feelRead More

Intangible Cultural Heritage: An International Dialogue, Part 2

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Against the backdrop of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival last June, the Center hosted Intangible Cultural Heritage: An International Dialogue, a gathering which brought together scholars and professionals working on issues of cultural heritage policy to discuss international approaches, challenges, and opportunities for collaboration. Participants working in intangible cultural heritage, or ICH, came from China, Kenya, Senegal, all over the United States, and from across the Smithsonian. Panel: Transnational Theory and Practice in Action Anthony Seeger, moderator 1:00 Danny Yung, flower plaque artist, Hong Kong 6:49 Kathryn Coney-Ali, Lamu Cultural Museum and World Monuments Fund, Kenya 25:07 Vera Nakonechny, Ukrainian embroidery artist, Philadelphia 38:40 Elizabeth Peterson, American Folklife Center 49:36 Discussion 1:02:02 Read more: http://www.folklife.si.edu/talkstory/2014/intangible-cultural-heritage-an-international-dialogue/ [Catalog No. CFV10716; Copyright 2015 Smithsonian Institution]

Intangible Cultural Heritage: An International Dialogue, Part 1

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Against the backdrop of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival last June, the Center hosted Intangible Cultural Heritage: An International Dialogue, a gathering which brought together scholars and professionals working on issues of cultural heritage policy to discuss international approaches, challenges, and opportunities for collaboration. Participants working in intangible cultural heritage, or ICH, came from China, Kenya, Senegal, all over the United States, and from across the Smithsonian. Introduction (Richard Kurin) 0:46 Opening remarks (Michael Mason) 12:23 Panel: Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage Meredith Holmgren, moderator 18:46 Dr. Gao Bingzhong, Peking University and China Folklore Society 21:05 John Kamanga, Southern Rift Association of Landowners, Kenya 43:43 Robert Baron, New York State Council on the Arts 1:00:03 Response: Tim Lloyd, American Folklore Society 1:25:30 Discussion 1:38:35 Read more: http://www.folklife.si.edu/talkstory/2014/intangible-cultural-heritage-an-international-dialogue/ [Catalog No. CFV10715; Copyright 2015 Smithsonian Institution]

Intangible Cultural Heritage: An International Dialogue, Part 3

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Against the backdrop of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival last June, the Center hosted Intangible Cultural Heritage: An International Dialogue, a gathering which brought together scholars and professionals working on issues of cultural heritage policy to discuss international approaches, challenges, and opportunities for collaboration. Participants working in intangible cultural heritage, or ICH, came from China, Kenya, Senegal, all over the United States, and from across the Smithsonian. Round Table: Producing and Consuming Heritage in the Public Sphere Michelle Stefano, moderator 0:08 Ren Hexin, Dimen Dong Cultural Eco-Museum, China (Joanna Lee, translator) 4:06 Lily Kharrazi, Alliance for California Traditional Arts 16:07 Nicholas Spitzer, "American Routes" radio host 26:27 Marsha MacDowell, Michigan State University Museum 43:43 Kurt Dewhurst, Michigan State University Museum 58:17 Discussion 1:08:03 Maasai shield repatriation 1:34:22 Closing remarks (James Counts Early) 1:36:24 Read more: http://www.folklife.si.edu/talkstory/2014/intangible-cultural-heritage-an-international-dialogue/ [Catalog No. CFV10717; Copyright 2015 Smithsonian Institution]

Meredydd Evans: The Power of the Welsh Language and Cultural Identity

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Meredydd Evans, Professor of Philosophy, writer, and performer has long been an advocate for the Welsh language. In this 2008 interview, he discusses how language is an inseparable part of cultural identity. [Catalog No. CFV10514; Copyright 2013 Smithsonian Institution]

Cultural Tradition Meets Economic Difficulties: A Reflection on Sustaining Miao Embroidery

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
The China program at the 2014 Folklife Festival provided so much to see—even for a native Chinese person like myself.Read More

Hugh Masekela Speaking at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
South African jazz musician and activist visited the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage in Washington, D.C., in 2014. During an open interview, he shared his thoughts on sustaining cultural heritage through music. Video and editing: Charlie Weber [Catalog No. CFV10977; Copyright 2018, Smithsonian Institution]

Basque Food and Culture

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Experience the rich and diverse foods of Basque country at the 2016 Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C., June 29-July 4 and July 7-10. Editing: Claudia Romano and Lillian Schneyer Videography: Cristina Díaz-Carrera, Justin Hensley, Josue Castilleja Music: Kepa Junkera [Catalog No. CFV10803; Copyright 2016 Smithsonian Institution]

Theodore Roosevelt in Kenya

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Before there was a Folklife Festival, before the Smithsonian research centers spanned from New York to Belize, and before presidentsRead More

CFCH at the Heart of America

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
With new leadership in this moment of transition and possibility, the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage at the SmithsonianRead More

Paul Robeson

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
An American giant of 20th century music, Paul Robeson stood tall against racism, McCarthyism, and blacklisting to proclaim the majesty of African-American culture. Jeff Place and Dr. Bob Cataliotti discuss his life and work.

Jean Ritchie

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Jean Ritchie is an American folk singer, songwriter, and dulcimer player from rural Kentucky who, upon moving to New York City in the 1940s, became known as the "Mother of Folk." Host Sam Litzinger and archivist Jeff Place discuss the life and music of Jean Ritchie with guest Stephanie Smith, assistant archivist at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Raise the Spirits for Ancestor Amiri Baraka

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
For many days to come, people of all races, ethnic groups, classes, ages, ideologies, and politics will be sharing theirRead More
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