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Contemporary Avenues

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Pastel colored designs including plaids, irregular stripes, birds and seemingly random brush strokes. Small patterns on open backgrounds. 13 different designs, each shown in multiple colorways.

Contemporary Weapons

National Air and Space Museum
White background with brown, grey drawings of landmines, cannons, grenades, airplanes, knife, sword, bayonet and naval ship; brown, yellow, grey ink on paper with metal hangers at bottom and top. Offset Lithograph/Relief Halftone.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Copyright Disclosure for Orphaned Works

Whenever possible, the museum provides factual information about copyright owners and related matters in its records and other texts related to the collections. For many of the images in this collection, some of which were created for or by corporate entities that no longer exist, the museum does not own any copyrights. Therefore, it generally does not grant or deny permission to copy, distribute or otherwise use material in this collection. If identified, permission and possible fees may be required from the copyright owner independently of the museum. It is the user's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other use restrictions when copying, distributing or otherwise using materials found in the museum's collections. Transmission or reproduction of protected materials beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Users must make their own assessments of rights in light of their intended use.

If you have any more information about an item you've seen in the Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection, or if you are a copyright owner and believe we have not properly attributed your work to you or have used it without permission, we want to hear from you. Please contact pisanod@si.edu with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

View more information about the Smithsonian's general copyright policies at http://www.si.edu/termsofuse

Contemporary Korean Ceramics

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Artist Mei-ling Hom and independent scholar David McClelland introduce contemporary fine art ceramics in Korea and highlight ceramic artists they met and interviewed during a year of Fulbright research. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Contemporary Daguerreotype Portrait

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Follow the early photographic process of daguerreotype portraiture with contemporary daguerreotypist, Mike Robinson.

Contemporary Art Conservation

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Latex, chocolate, soap, and video game software are just a few of the non-traditional materials that have inspired contemporary artists. While they embrace the modern, synthetic and technologically advanced world in which we live, some of materials present significant conservation problems for museum conservators. Gwynne Ryan, a conservator at the Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden discusses the challenges museums face with this issue: Should we keep art locked away to make it last? Or let it be experienced as it was intended while accelerating its natural degradation? For more information about the Hirshhorn's conservation program, visit: http://hirshhorn.si.edu/educate/page.asp?key=205&subkey=75

The Contemporary Suitor

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Clipping from Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, poem with illustrations by Frederick Stuart Church. Top; center, profile of woman with long hair, roses by her side. Left, head of lion, right, profile of lion with mouth open.

Man's Contemporary Hat

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
Fedora-style man's hat made of woven gray cotton (?) and clear plastic threads. Has a band made from a synthetic (polyester?) ribbon, black with white geometric patterns. The band has a loop on one side, possibly for attachments (feathers, other decorations?). Inside is a white sweat band with a tag printed with blue and white symbols and blue Chinese characters. Chinese characters are also on the back. Commonly seen today, often accompanying a deel. Sometimes string or straps are attached beneath the chin to secure the hat (Video Footage, Tape 4, 7/10/02).

Contemporary Art is OK

Smithsonian Magazine

#SLCYAP2018: Contemporary Latino Communities

Smithsonian Latino Center
The Smithsonian Latino Center Young Ambassadors Program presents “Representing Contemporary Latino Communities” featuring Alberto Ferreras, Independent Filmmaker and Director, HBO Habla Series (Moderator); Alex Pena, Digital Journalist, CBS News; Gabby Rivera, Writer, Juliet Takes a Breath and America for Marvel Comics; Benito Sánchez YAP’09, Starz Productions. The Smithsonian Latino Center gratefully acknowledges major and continued program support from Ford. #FordGivesBack

#SLCYAP2016: Contemporary Latino Communities

Smithsonian Latino Center
The Smithsonian Latino Center Young Ambassadors Program presents “Representing Contemporary Latino Communities” featuring Gustavo Arellano, Alberto Ferreras, Adrian Florido, and Elianne Ramos. The Smithsonian Latino Center gratefully acknowledges major and continued program support from Ford. #FordGivesBack

#SLCYAP2017: Contemporary Latino Communities

Smithsonian Latino Center
Join the Smithsonian Latino Center’s Young Ambassadors Program for a “Contemporary Latino Communities” conversation featuring: Lalo Alcaraz, Artist and Political Cartoonist; Alberto Ferreras, Director, HBO Habla Series; Gisele Regatao, Creator of Sangre Celestial, A Radionovela Podcast, KCRW; Shirley Rumierk, Actress, RISE on NBC. Facebook Live session available at: https://www.facebook.com/SLCLatino/ The Smithsonian Latino Center gratefully acknowledges major and continued support from Ford Fund. #FordGivesBack

"Five Contemporary American Concretionists"

Archives of American Art
1 exhibition announcement : ill. ; 53 x 40 cm.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions Exhibition

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, this pioneering exhibition examines how Muslim women—those who cover and those who do not—have become arbiters of style within and beyond their communities. "Contemporary Muslim Fashions" features approximately 80 ensembles drawn from established and emerging designers in high-end fashion, streetwear, sportswear and couture, as well as about 40 photographs to contextualize the garments on view. On view February 28–August 23, 2020 at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

Contemporary Hungarian Artist Exhibit

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The old negative number is 18463. See als Negative Numbers 18463-A and 18463-B for painting displays; 18463-C for metalwork case.

Exhibit of Contemporary Hungarian Artists under auspices of the American Federation of Arts and the American-Hungarian Foundation, at the National Gallery, now the NMAA, in the MNH, April 23-May 31, 1930. Photo shows 17 small sculptures in a large glass display case.

Temporal, Contemporary, Spatial, Dynamic

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
At upper section in dark blue and white, a photographic reproduction of a nebula. Below, horizontal registrars of cloud-like shapes in three shades of light blue stretch across the sheet. Lower quadrant is white. At center in black and white, a square with a photograph of an ear and an eye. The words: Arts & / Communications / Media with an orange sphere hover above the eye. Printed in orange upper left and upper right: spatial / temporal / contemporary / dynamic.

Indian and Contemporary Chair

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Contemporary Art Jewelry in Perspective

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Damian Skinner, curator of applied art and design at the Auckland Museum and editor of the new book Contemporary Jewelry in Perspective, discusses the fascinating world of contemporary jewelry. Using unique pieces, Skinner places the medium in a historical and cultural context.

Contemporary Daguerreotype of the Capitol

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Follow the early photographic process of making a daguerreotype of the Capitol with contemporary daguerreotypist, Mike Robinson, explaining the technique.

Graficas: Contemporary Latin American Prints

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Poster advertising "Graficas: Contemporary Latin American Prints" featuring an etching by Juan Calderon. The image is of a pear with a stem and two drooping leaves seated on a gray upholstered armchair. Beneath: "Graficas / Contemporary Latin American Prints" And in much smaller typeface: "Organized from the collections of Container Corporation of America and its Latin American Affiliates (Carton y Papel de Mexico, S.A., Carton de Venezuela, S.A., / and Carton de Colombia, S.A. with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service/Joe Goulait © 1978 Smithsonian Institution" And very small, at bottom center: "'I'll Die in Paris in a Heavy Storm,' by Juan Calderon, etching, 1978"

Card says: Smithsonian Institution

Mirror of contemporary relief-pictures

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Marres Center for Contemporary Culture Stationary

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
An X and two lines at top and bottom composed of what look like crayon rubbings along an edge. In black ink, lower left: MARRES / CENTRE FOR / CONTEMPORARY / CULTURE; center: Capucijnenstraat 98 / 6211 RT Maastricht / The Netherlands / T +31. (0) 43.3270207 / F +31. (0) 43. 3270208 / info @ marres.org / /www.marres.org.

Marres Center for Contemporary Culture Envelope

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
A4 envelope

Marres Center for Contemporary Culture Envelope

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
A5 envelope
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