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Dolores Huerta: A Latina civil rights icon

Smithsonian Insider

Latina labor rights leader, Dolores Huerta (b. April 10, 1930), is best known for her role in the California farm workers’ movement of the 1960s […]

The post Dolores Huerta: A Latina civil rights icon appeared first on Smithsonian Insider.

Civil Rights Movement

National Museum of American History

NAACP Civil Rights Convention

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., Joe Louis, Thurgood Marshall, and Daisy Lampkin seated outside under an open-air tent.

Civil Rights Demonstration, Washington, DC

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A crowd of people face away from the camera towards the Lincoln Memorial in the background. In the foreground, more people sit on the steps facing the camera.

First base used in Inaugural Civil Rights Game

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Square first base baseball base used in the 2007 inaugural Major League Baseball [MLB] Civil Rights baseball game. Top of base has printed design featuring an illustration of three fists grabbing a bat. Next to the design, black type reads, [CIVIL / RIGHTS / GAME]. Text that reads: [Original Hollywood Base/ Jack Corbett / Schutt Sports] is impressed over the design and black text. The MLB logo is both in ink and impressed on the top of the base. Four rectangular plaques appear on the sides of the base. Two of the sides feature plaques that have the MLB logo next to white type that reads, [CIVIL RIGHTS GAME]. One of the other sides has red type that reads, [St. Louis] in the style of the St. Louis Cardinals logo. The last side reads in red type, [Cleveland] in the style of the Cleveland Indians logo. Handwritten in black on bottom edge of the base is: [1ST B / SET B]. A sticker is near the black handwriting. There is also a stamp in red that reads: [Nov 28 2006]. There is dirt on all over the base.

Smithsonian Source: Civil Rights

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Section of SmithsonianSource.org intended to supplement the materials you currently use for lessons on the civil rights struggle. Includes a variety of teaching strategies and guidelines, a video in which Smithsonian curators examine a photograph of civil rights leader Medgar Evans, DBQs, lesson plans organized by grade level, and primary-source documents from the Smithsonian collections.

An American Civil Rights Icon Greets His Supporters

Smithsonian Insider

An American Civil Rights Icon Greets His Supporters This photograph shows Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–1968) greeting supporters in Baltimore after he won the Nobel […]

The post An American Civil Rights Icon Greets His Supporters appeared first on Smithsonian Insider.

Button, "Give Us This Day Our Civil Rights"

National Museum of American History
The most basic right of citizenship has been equal access and protection under the law. The fight to extend this right to all began before the Declaration of Independence proclaimed “all men are created equal,” and continues today.

Button, "Civil Rights Are Our Rights Too!"

National Museum of American History
The most basic right of citizenship has been equal access and protection under the law. The fight to extend this right to all began before the Declaration of Independence proclaimed “all men are created equal,” and continues today.

Image of a civil rights protest outside Greenville City Hall

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white film negative featuring the image of a civil rights protest outside Greenville City Hall. In the image, men and women form a picket line carrying homemade protest signs, while being watched by individuals just out of frame to the left. Just right of center, a man wearing a light-colored cap carries in his right hand a sign reading, [Gov. Johnson Prevents / Federal Aid To / MISSISSIPPI'S SCHOOLS].

Image of a civil rights protest outside Greenville City Hall

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white film negative featuring the image of civil rights protesters in Greenville, Mississippi. The image features a line of men and women walking single file in two lines, while holding handmade protest signs, while a line of people face them, visible only in shadows. Just right of center, a woman in a light-colored coat and scarf holds a sign reading, [We REJECT / the / "GRADE / A- / YEAR" / PLAN]. Behind her are two men whose signs are only partially visible, followed by a woman carrying a sign stating, [GREENVILLE / DEMERIT / AWARD / POOR / HOUSING].

Image of a civil rights protest outside Greenville City Hall

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white film negative featuring the image of a picket line outside Greenville City Hall. The image shows a line of men and women marching while carrying homemade protest signs. In the center of the frame, a man carries a large sign reading, [11 YEARS / OF / ILLEGAL / SCHOOLS]. A uniformed police officer watches the protesters to the right of frame. City Hall is not visible in this image, but is behind the photographer.

Remembering Frank Kameny, civil rights pioneer

National Museum of American History

Image of a civil rights protest outside Greenville City Hall

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white film negative featuring the image of a picket line outside Greenville City Hall. The image, taken from a low angle, shows a line of men and women marching while carrying homemade protest signs. In the center of the frame, a man carries a large sign reading, [11 YEARS / OF / ILLEGAL / SCHOOLS]. A uniformed police officer watches the protesters from the left of frame. City Hall is not visible in this image, but is across the street.

Image of a civil rights protest outside Greenville City Hall

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white film negative featuring the image of a picket line outside Greenville City Hall. The image, taken from a low angle, shows a line of men and women marching while carrying homemade protest signs. First in line, a woman carries a sign reading [WE WILL / NOT LET / POLICE / BRUTALITY / CONTINUE]. Behind her a man's sign reads [ALL-MERIT / Greenville / FOR / ALL!]. City Hall is not visible in this image, but is across the street.

Image of a civil rights protest outside Greenville City Hall

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white film negative featuring the image of a picket line outside Greenville City Hall. The image shows City Hall in the background and the backs of uniformed police officers and other men watching a picket line of protesters carrying signs.

Image of a civil rights protest outside Greenville City Hall

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white film negative featuring the image of a picket line outside Greenville City Hall. The image, taken from a low angle, shows a line of men and women marching while carrying homemade protest signs. In the center of the frame, a woman carries a large sign reading, [NOW / WE / NOW / SHALL / NOW / OVERCOME / NOW]. A uniformed police officer watches the protesters from the left of frame. City Hall is not visible in this image, but is across the street.

Image of a civil rights protest outside Greenville City Hall

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white film negative featuring the image of a picket line outside Greenville City Hall. The image shows City Hall in the background and the backs of uniformed police officers and other men watching a picket line of protesters carrying signs.

Image of a civil rights protest outside Greenville City Hall

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white film negative featuring the image of a picket line outside Greenville City Hall. The image shows City Hall in the background and the backs of uniformed police officers and other men watching a picket line of protesters carrying signs.

Policemen Use Police Dogs During Civil Rights Demonstrations, Birmingham Protests

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of an African American man having his left pant leg torn off by a police dog. There are several white police officers with additional dogs and several other African American demonstrators standing in a crowd. The print is signed [Charles Moore] on the back in pencil.

Civil Rights: From Lincoln to Today

Smithsonian Education
At the 1963 March on Washington, Dr. King famously said that he was in the nation's capital to "cash a check" for Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness, as promised a hundred years earlier by the Emancipation Proclamation. In this session, we'll take a look at the legacy of Lincoln's famous decree and the work that many leaders, ordinary citizens and even students undertook during the Civil Rights Movement to make a difference in today's world. Presented by: Christopher W. Wilson, National Museum of American History Naomi Coquillon, National Museum of American History Original Airdate: February 13, 2013 You can stay connected with the Smithsonian's upcoming online events and view a full collection of past sessions on a variety of topics.: http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/educators/events/online_events.html
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