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Found 950 Collections

 

Tuia te here tangata waka | Binding the ties of humanity canoe

This collection is built around a waka Māori currently on display in the National Museum of Natural History.
waka is a traditional canoe. It is designed as a portal to Te Ao Māori - The indigenous worldview  Māori are the native people of New Zealand. Its traditional name is Aotearoa meaning Land of the long white cloud.

This waka was made from a single 100-year old Tōtara tree. Tōtara is a large native New Zealand hardwood that grows throughout the North and South Island. It is light weighted and high natural oil content which prevents rotting or deterioration. Waka are extensions of Māori tribal history and are the traditional technology responsible for mobilising navigators across the Pacific Ocean. The infamous explorer Kupe, discovered New Zealand in 925 AD.

The name of the waka is Tuia te here tangata meaning Binding the ties of humanity. It celebrates the connection established in 1840 between the US Exploring expedition and Māori. The name and physical artefact hope to inspire understanding. The collection aims to digitally illustrate the mauri or life force of the waka. We can transform our wounds into wisdom by seeking first to understand, and then to be understood.

Anahera Hare
48
 

CoPilotWhoDidItFirst

This collection was created to support an online class for elementary teachers focusing on STEM individuals as we study "Who Did It First?.

Erin Grossi
8
 

Distance Learning: Teaching Persepolis

The purpose of this collection is to model for educators distance learning instruction:

  1. using museum artifacts & visual texts to learn/ teach
    • historical/ cultural context for novel study
  2. using Project Zero thinking routines to interrogate text
Sher Anderson Petty
32
 

Easy PZ: Unveiling Stories & Building Culturally Responsive Teaching Practice

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "Unveiling Stories" with a museum resource from the National Museum of African American History and Culture as a method to help teachers develop their practice of culturally responsive teaching.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
26
 

Easy PZ: Unveiling Stories & Culturally Responsive Teaching with Students

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "Unveiling Stories" with a museum resource from the National Museum of African Art to support culturally responsive teaching.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
15
 

"Explore with Smithsonian Experts" Film Series

This video series, Explore with Smithsonian Experts, connects students and teachers with the skill and technique of Smithsonian experts who describe their work at our nation's museums. In each short film, experts introduce new ways to observe, record, research and share, while using real artifacts and work experiences.

Keywords: entomology, arthropod, insects, beetles, ants, scientific method, verification, President Abraham Lincoln, March on Washington, The Wright Brothers, Orville and Wilbur Wright, flight, astrophotography, cosmos, astronomy, abstract art, El Anatsui, portraits, portraiture, President George Washington, Gertrude Stein, Gordon, Pocahontas, LL Cool J, Kehinde Wiley, Nicholasa Mohr, Dolores Huerta, Puerto Rico, Luis Muñoz Marín, Rudolfo Anaya, urban photography, Shifting States: Iraq, Luis Cruz Azaceta, choreography, dance, Japanese American incarceration (internment) camps, World War II, Queen Kapi'olani, Hawaii, diplomacy, Ecuadorian boat seat, Anansi spider, Ángel Suárez Rosado, baseball, Latino community, archiving, community, Anacostia

#EthnicStudies

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
44
 

Air and Space Symbols

This collection explores our nation's symbols and how mission and squadron patches incorporate symbolism in their design.  Students are then encouraged to create their own patch.

Grade 1 Social Studies: Civic Values 1.2

Students identify and describe the symbols, icons, songs, and traditions of the United States that exemplify cherished ideals and provide continuity and a sense of community across time. 

Keywords: #airandspace, National Air and Space Museum, NASM, patch, logo, symbol, Tuskegee airmen, 

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
21
 

STEM in Real Life: Science, Technology, Engineering, Math and More at the National Air and Space Museum

How does Science, Technology, Engineering and Math work in the real world? How can you learn about these subjects through artifacts at the National Air and Space Museum? Can you also learn about art, or music? Find the answers to all of these questions and more on this episode of STEM in 30. Teachers, tune in to this special, 50th episode of STEM in 30 to learn all about STEM in real life.

National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Symbols

Jean-Marie Galing
17
 

Balance & Symmetry

Which type of balance is represented in each image?

  • Symmetrical balance
  • Radial balance
  • Asymmetrical balance
Jean-Marie Galing
16
 

Modular Designs

Observe and discuss selected images. . . 

  • What shapes or forms are combined in each image?
  • What purpose do you think it was designed for? Why do you think that?
  • What do all the images have in common?

After discussion, construct a definition of the term "modular."

ART MAKING CHALLENGES: 

  • Create a modular sculpture for a community space using cut and folded paper or tag board.
  • Draw a modular design for a building with a specific purpose.
  • Design modular storage for a small apartment. 
  • Design modular furniture that could be rearranged for different purposes. 

Jean-Marie Galing
15
 

Fabulous Fabrics

Use images to introduce a stamp-printing lesson with primary students. Observe selected images and discuss. . . 

  • What shapes or lines do you see?
  • Which fabrics have repeat patterns?
  • Which fabrics have alternating patterns?
  • What could the fabric be used for?

Play a sorting game with images printed on cards. Categories for sorting could include stripes, plaid, checkerboard, floral, polka dot, etc.

ART MAKING CHALLENGE: 

  • Students will stamp print on paper with cardboard edges, stampers, or found objects to create patterns. 
  • Printed paper will then be cut into clothing for collage self portraits.

Jean-Marie Galing
23
 

Smithsonian Social Studies Online: What happens when cultures collide? / Smithsonian Estudios Sociales en Línea: ¿Qué ocurre cuando dos culturas chocan?

This collection contains lesson plans and resources from across the Smithsonian to help students critically examine this essential question through multiple Social Studies content areas. 

Esta colección contiene planes de lecciones y recursos de todo el Smithsonian para ayudar a estudiantes a examinar críticamente esta esencial pregunta a través de múltiples areas de contenido en Estudios Sociales.

National Museum of American History
16
 

Dolores Huerta: Revolution in the Fields/Revolución en los Campos

Dolores Huerta: Revolution in the Fields/Revolución en los Campos shares the compelling story of legendary activist and leader Dolores Huerta (b. 1930) and the farm workers movement of the 1960s and 70s. It is a quintessentially American tale of struggle and sacrifice, of courage and victory.

As a complement to the exhibition, these educational resources explore Huerta's public life as an activist and co-founder of the United Farm Workers  (UFW) and what led her to become a Latina civil rights icon. In her life as a communicator, organizer, lobbyist, contract negotiator, teacher and mother,  Huerta's unparalleled leadership skills helped dramatically improve the lives of farm workers.

Users will broaden their understanding of the farm workers movement through a careful look at Dolores Huerta's significant - but often under-acknowledged - contributions. The exhibition and educational resources also explore how workers of different ethnic and racial backgrounds came together to empower the movement and how the arts played an essential role. In addition, users will come to understand Huerta's far-reaching impact and important legacy.

The resources in this collection include a bilingual community engagement resource to promote dialogue on issues that relate to social justice, activism, leadership, etc. A few activities that can be used in the classroom or when you visit the exhibition at your local museum.  In addition, you can learn more by listening to Dolores Huerta by downloading the free downloadable App "Dolores Huerta" on Google and Apple.  Please remember that the App takes a few minutes to download.


#NHD #NHD2020  #BecauseOfHerStory


Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service
57
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Trapped")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through visual and historical analysis of the art piece "Trapped" Alvin Carl Hollingsworth (1965), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the late 1960's including discriminatory housing policies and the Black Arts Movement. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
11
 

In Full Color: The Black Arts Movement of the 1960s-70s

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 70s. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through this collection of resources from different Smithsonian museum and biographies of famous artists, students will learn more about the major influences and themes of this period of African American revolution and expression. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in synthesizing information and analyzing primary sources. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What are the dominant themes of the social and political climate of the 1960s and 70s?
  • How did the major events of the 1960s and 70s shape the artistic production of the period?
  • Who were some of the influential figures in the Black Arts Movement?
  • What are some of the shared goals of African American artists during the 1960s and 70s?
  • How did artists during this period respond to the the social and political climate?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
36
 

James Smithson: What's in a Name?

Do you know how the Smithsonian got its name?  If you answered "no" you are not alone.  A lot of people know about the Smithsonian Institution, but they don't know about the man who gave his name and bequest to create what has become the largest museum complex and research center in the world.

Curious?  Well, here's the story...

Laura Shafer
11
 

Art + Social Emotional Learning (SEL)

An online teacher workshop exploring art and mindful integration of social-emotional skills.

Tuesday, May, 19, 2020

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
13
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Park

Follow along to design a park inspired by 2017 National Design Award Winner for Landscape Architecture, Surfacedesign.

Gerald Smith
24
 

Like a Fish to Water

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring swimming. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a video about water safety as well as a videos about animals swimming. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
36
 

New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Planning Tool

Using a sample lesson "The Blues and The Great Depression" provided by the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) as a model, this collection demonstrates how the Smithsonian Learning Lab can be a useful tool to curate digital resources that support a lesson for arts integration.

In this lesson, students will learn about the structure and content of the blues using songs from the 1930s and the Great Depression.Students will brainstorm circumstances of the Great Depression and use those ideas to create an original blues song from the point of view of someone living during the Great Depression.

Essential questions: 

● How does blues music reflect the challenges of poverty for the African-American experience during the Great Depression?
● How do images and songs reflect the emotions of the African-American experience during the Great Depression?


The original lesson was created by the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) and included in their Arts Integration User Guide for NJ Educators and Practitioners, starting on p. 90 (http://njpsa.org/documents/EdLdrsAsSchol2018/artsintegrationWorkbook2018.pdf).

Ashley Naranjo
23
 

History Lab: Time Capsules

In this History Lab, we will think about how many objects can work together to tell a story. How does a time capsule help us to learn about the past? What would you put in your own time capsule?

To talk with us and learn about more time capsules, join us for the History Lab Debrief! Visit https://www.heinzhistorycenter... and look for the History Lab section to find the registration link. We hope you can join us!

HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
25
 

Maps

Jean-Marie Galing
8
 

Pearly Whites

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring teeth. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about teeth as well as explore videos about animal teeth. Families can listen to read alouds and podcasts about teeth. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
25
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