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Romare Bearden's Art and Music

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service
How did Romare Bearden incorporate jazz and other forms of music into his work? Listen to experts and Bearden himself describe his process. From the Smithsonian traveling exhibition "Romare Bearden: A Black Odyssey," currently on its national tour. Check the schedule to see if the exhibition is coming to a museum near you. http://www.sites.si.edu/romarebearden/

Woodstock Music and Art Fair

National Museum of American History

Ragnar Kjartansson on Playfulness in Art and Music

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Ragnar Kjartansson discusses some of his artistic influences. “Ragnar Kjartansson” (Oct. 14 2016- Jan. 8, 2017) Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York and i8 Gallery, Reykjavík. The exhibition is conceived and organized by the Barbican, London, in association with the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC.

Woodstock Music and Art Fair ticket

National Museum of American History

Why Art and Music Lovers Are Flocking to South Carolina's Lowcountry

Smithsonian Magazine

Upon arrival, visitors are immediately struck by the quiet, natural beauty and distinct style of Palmetto Bluff, a residential resort community in South Carolina’s Lowcountry. Architecturally, the homes at Palmetto Bluff celebrate both Southern culture and contemporary living, all in harmony with the land. Located on 20,000 acres of natural splendor, gas lanterns echo the warm glow of painted sunsets, open porches invite in cool, coastal breezes and trees bow with genteel hospitality over oyster shell walkways.

But there is much more going on here: Palmetto Bluff is rapidly gaining attention for its diverse and sophisticated arts scene. In addition to the unique sculptures housed in varied natural settings throughout the community, Palmetto Bluff hosts frequent events featuring renowned regional artists, makers, musicians and performers.

Public art shows throughout the year feature artists from across the region, and workshops, lectures and classes offer residents and guests the opportunity to engage and interact with artists and gain an experiential understanding of their work.

Palmetto Bluff also launched an Artist in Residence program, in collaboration with Garden & Gun magazine, to celebrate the arts, foster creativity and offer hands-on education for guests and residents. Each month, a notable artisan, including winners of Garden & Gun’s annual Made in the South Awards, is invited to stay on-site at the Artist Cottage in the newly constructed Moreland Village. Artists in Residence have ranged from painters and sculptors to jewelry designers, bakers, glass artists, chocolatiers and craftsmen, offering the community unique learning opportunities and insight into an array of specialties.

In April 2018, Brackish co-founders Ben Ross and Jeff Plotner are moving in. The two artisans have been handcrafting one-of-a-kind, sustainably-sourced feather bow ties and accessories in Charleston since 2007. Taking up to five hours to make, each piece is a wearable work of art, and because every single feather is individually selected, no two Brackish ties are exactly alike.

In addition to regular gallery hours, Ross and Plotner will be hosting a “Fancy Feather” workshop, teaching participants how to construct one of their remarkable feather pins, and an “Earrings with Outdoor Appeal” demo class, showing guests how to make show-stopping ear-wear from pheasant, quail, peacock and guinea fowl feathers.

For music lovers, Palmetto Bluff offers a dazzling array of performances throughout the year. The Lowcountry is home to a diverse range of musical styles – from blues, jazz and bluegrass to Southern rock and Lowcountry stomp – and musical events are at the centerpiece of the social calendar. There is no better way to enjoy a beautiful summer evening than at the outdoor Summer Concert Series, and each November, Palmetto Bluff hosts the annual Music to Your Mouth Festival, a multiday food and wine celebration featuring award-winning Southern chefs, winemakers, brewers and artisans, layered with local, regional and Grammy-award winning musical talent. Portions of the proceeds go to Second Helpings, a local organization that distributes food to over 60 agencies serving those in need in the Lowcountry.

***

See a full list of upcoming events at Palmetto Bluff

Woodstock Music and Art Fair Patch

National Museum of American History

Woodstock Music and Art Fair Program Book

National Museum of American History

Music

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Popular Music, Popular Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Oregon - Music and Performing Arts

Smithsonian Magazine

The rugged beauty of the coast and the energy of its battering waves inspire a vibrant community of artists, performers, writers and musicians. With an array of events and attractions such as poetry readings like the Astoria Fisher Poets Gathering, arts-and-crafts festivals like the Stormy Weather Arts Festival, and music festivals including Jazz at Newport, Chowder, Blues & Brews and the Oregon Coast Music Festival, a coast getaway will rekindle your sense of discovery. In Eugene, view a performance of the Eugene Opera and the Eugene Ballet at the acclaimed Hult Center for Performing Arts. Farther north, catch sidewalk art, live music, and independent movies at Corvallis’ da Vinci Days, or line dance at Oregon Jamboree, the Northwest's premier country music and camping festival. In Southern Oregon, jam to local music at Medford's annual Art in Bloom Festival, watch the graceful pirouettes of Ballet Rogue at the Craterian Ginger Rogers Theatre, or listen to swing and jazz at Jazz Jubilee. Central Oregon hosts many live music events, including the Cascade Festival of Music, Munch & Music, Music on the Green, and Sunriver Music Festival.

Latest National Report Card Shows Little Student Improvement in Music and Art

Smithsonian Magazine

Every year, the National Center for Education Statistics releases a report card detailing how well America’s students do in math, reading and science. But every once in a while the survey also looks at how well students are doing when it comes to visual arts and music education. LA Johnson at NPR reports that in a recently release report, students aren’t doing too hot.

According to the report card, which has been issued twice before in 1997 and 2008, student knowledge about and skill in the arts has remained flat for the past eight years. According to Johnson, the survey was given to 8,800 eighth graders from 280 schools. They were asked questions like "Identify a correct time signature for a piece of printed music" and "Identify the style of an artwork as surrealism."

In the 2008 music test, students averaged 150 on a 300 point scale. In 2016, they averaged 147. In visual arts, the average was also 150 in 2008 and was 149 last year.

While holding steady may not seem too horrible, digging into the data shows both good and bad trends.

-According to the data, boys are falling behind girls when it comes to music. While the music score for girls did not change between 2008 and 2016, staying steady at 155, the average score for boys fell from 145 to 140.

-Students are not participating in music and arts activities as much outside of school. According to the data, about 35 percent of students said that they played a musical instrument outside of school and only 13 percent reported taking art classes outside of school. Less than half of students in the survey, only 42 percent, took an art class in school.  The Nation's Report Card paints a picture that shows eighth-graders continuing to take arts classes at the same rates and performing at the same levels as eight years ago," Peggy Carr, the acting commissioner of the National Center for Education Statistics says in a press release. “We are noticing, however, that students are less likely to participate in activities such as taking art classes or playing a musical instrument outside of school.”

-In visual arts, the score gap between white and Hispanic students decreased from 26 points in 2008 to 19 points in 2016. In music the difference changed from 32 points in 2008 to 23 points in 2016. The performance of students identified as Asian and Pacific Islanders surpassed white students for the first time, with scores averaging four points higher in music and eight points higher in visual arts. Scores in both categories remain almost unchanged for black students.

-While the four major regions of the United States—the Northeast, Midwest, South and West—all saw at least small ticks downward, in music, the Midwest saw a six point drop. In visual arts, the West saw an increase of five points while the Midwest saw a seven point drop. The south and Northeast stayed virtually the same, with the Northeast boasting the highest averages in both music and visual arts. They also reported taking more art classes outside of school. Jeff Poulin, the program director for arts education at Americans for the Arts,
tells Jackie Zubrzycki at Education Week that the regional data isn't surprising and “speaks to the importance of state education policy for arts education.”

-Lower income students who qualified for free or subsidized lunches did significantly worse than their better off peers, scoring 24 points lower in music and 22 points lower in art. “[T]oo often in America, zip code is destiny,” Michael Blakeslee, the executive director of the National Association for Music Education, tells Zubrzycki. “We'd love to see a more equitable access to the arts and to the results arts can bring.” 

Woodstock

National Museum of American History

No Title Given: Guitars and Sheet Music, [art work] / (photographed by Walter Rosenblum)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

Photographed for: E. V. Thaw & Co., Inc.

1 photographic print : b&w, 8 x 10 in.

1 negative ; 4 x 5 in.

Woodstock Poster

National Museum of American History

Massachusetts - Music and Performing Arts

Smithsonian Magazine

Tanglewood
Tucked into the idyllic Berkshires, the highlands of western Massachusetts, Tanglewood is one of the country’s premier venues for music and the performing arts. The summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Tanglewood and its surrounding area is simply a beautiful place to spend a few days while soaking in the abundant offerings of art, music and natural beauty.

Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival
Also in the Berkshires, the Jacob’s Pillow was originally a farm that served as a stop on the Underground Railroad. Its 163 acres of grounds now include three stages, a professional school, restaurants, gardens, trails and woodlands. The festival, which lasts all summer, features dance in all its forms from all over the world.

Woodstock Music and Art Fair. Woodstock Festival, Bethel, NY August 16, 1969

National Museum of American History
With her camera, Lisa Law documented history in the heart of the counterculture revolution of the 1960s as she lived it, as a participant, an agent of change and a member of the broader culture. She recorded this unconventional time of Anti-War demonstrations in California, communes, Love-Ins, peace marches and concerts, as well as her family life as she became a wife and mother. The photographs were collected by William Yeingst and Shannon Perich in a cross-unit collecting collaboration. Together they selected over two hundred photographs relevant to photographic history, cultural history, domestic life and social history. Law’s portraiture and concert photographs include Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Lovin Spoonful and Peter, Paul and Mary. She also took several of Janis Joplin and her band Big Brother and the Holding Company, including the photograph used to create the poster included in the Smithsonian’s American Art Museum’s exhibition 1001 Days and Nights in American Art. Law and other members of the Hog Farm were involved in the logistics of setting up the well-known musical extravaganza, Woodstock. Her photographs include the teepee poles going into the hold of the plane, a few concert scenes and amenities like the kitchen and medical tent. Other photographs include peace rallies and concerts in Haight-Ashbury, Coretta Scott King speaking at an Anti-War protest and portraits of Allen Ginsburg and Timothy Leary. From her life in New Mexico the photographs include yoga sessions with Yogi Bhajan, bus races, parades and other public events. From life on the New Buffalo Commune, there are many pictures of her family and friends taken during meal preparation and eating, farming, building, playing, giving birth and caring for children. Ms. Law did not realize how important her photographs were while she was taking them. It was not until after she divorced her husband, left the farm for Santa Fe and began a career as a photographer that she realized the depth of history she recorded. Today, she spends her time writing books, showing her photographs in museums all over the United States and making documentaries. In 1990, her video documentary, “Flashing on the Sixties,” won several awards. A selection of photographs was featured in the exhibition A Visual Journey: Photographs by Lisa Law, 1964–1971, at the National Museum of American History October 1998-April 1999.

Woodstock Music and Art Fair. Woodstock Festival, Bethel, NY August 16, 1969

National Museum of American History
With her camera, Lisa Law documented history in the heart of the counterculture revolution of the 1960s as she lived it, as a participant, an agent of change and a member of the broader culture. She recorded this unconventional time of Anti-War demonstrations in California, communes, Love-Ins, peace marches and concerts, as well as her family life as she became a wife and mother. The photographs were collected by William Yeingst and Shannon Perich in a cross-unit collecting collaboration. Together they selected over two hundred photographs relevant to photographic history, cultural history, domestic life and social history. Law’s portraiture and concert photographs include Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Lovin Spoonful and Peter, Paul and Mary. She also took several of Janis Joplin and her band Big Brother and the Holding Company, including the photograph used to create the poster included in the Smithsonian’s American Art Museum’s exhibition 1001 Days and Nights in American Art. Law and other members of the Hog Farm were involved in the logistics of setting up the well-known musical extravaganza, Woodstock. Her photographs include the teepee poles going into the hold of the plane, a few concert scenes and amenities like the kitchen and medical tent. Other photographs include peace rallies and concerts in Haight-Ashbury, Coretta Scott King speaking at an Anti-War protest and portraits of Allen Ginsburg and Timothy Leary. From her life in New Mexico the photographs include yoga sessions with Yogi Bhajan, bus races, parades and other public events. From life on the New Buffalo Commune, there are many pictures of her family and friends taken during meal preparation and eating, farming, building, playing, giving birth and caring for children. Ms. Law did not realize how important her photographs were while she was taking them. It was not until after she divorced her husband, left the farm for Santa Fe and began a career as a photographer that she realized the depth of history she recorded. Today, she spends her time writing books, showing her photographs in museums all over the United States and making documentaries. In 1990, her video documentary, “Flashing on the Sixties,” won several awards. A selection of photographs was featured in the exhibition A Visual Journey: Photographs by Lisa Law, 1964–1971, at the National Museum of American History October 1998-April 1999.

Quill, playing on stage at the Woodstock Music and Art Fair. Bethel, NY August 16, 1969

National Museum of American History
With her camera, Lisa Law documented history in the heart of the counterculture revolution of the 1960s as she lived it, as a participant, an agent of change and a member of the broader culture. She recorded this unconventional time of Anti-War demonstrations in California, communes, Love-Ins, peace marches and concerts, as well as her family life as she became a wife and mother. The photographs were collected by William Yeingst and Shannon Perich in a cross-unit collecting collaboration. Together they selected over two hundred photographs relevant to photographic history, cultural history, domestic life and social history. Law’s portraiture and concert photographs include Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Lovin Spoonful and Peter, Paul and Mary. She also took several of Janis Joplin and her band Big Brother and the Holding Company, including the photograph used to create the poster included in the Smithsonian’s American Art Museum’s exhibition 1001 Days and Nights in American Art. Law and other members of the Hog Farm were involved in the logistics of setting up the well-known musical extravaganza, Woodstock. Her photographs include the teepee poles going into the hold of the plane, a few concert scenes and amenities like the kitchen and medical tent. Other photographs include peace rallies and concerts in Haight-Ashbury, Coretta Scott King speaking at an Anti-War protest and portraits of Allen Ginsburg and Timothy Leary. From her life in New Mexico the photographs include yoga sessions with Yogi Bhajan, bus races, parades and other public events. From life on the New Buffalo Commune, there are many pictures of her family and friends taken during meal preparation and eating, farming, building, playing, giving birth and caring for children. Ms. Law did not realize how important her photographs were while she was taking them. It was not until after she divorced her husband, left the farm for Santa Fe and began a career as a photographer that she realized the depth of history she recorded. Today, she spends her time writing books, showing her photographs in museums all over the United States and making documentaries. In 1990, her video documentary, “Flashing on the Sixties,” won several awards. A selection of photographs was featured in the exhibition A Visual Journey: Photographs by Lisa Law, 1964–1971, at the National Museum of American History October 1998-April 1999.

The Psychology of Long-Term Space Flight: Music, Art, and Creature Comforts - STEM in 30

National Air and Space Museum
If you've ever taken a long trip, you know that bringing your favorite things along will help get you through the journey. The same goes for astronauts in space. Music and the arts entertain them and give them a chance to break away from their demanding schedules. In this episode of STEM in 30, we'll dive into how music, art, and creature comforts helps astronauts cope with long-term space travel. This program is made possible through the generous support of NASA. More: airandspace.si.edu/stem-30
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