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“Old" Nice

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
View looking down on houses, close together.

“Mega” Architecture: An Evening with Moshe Safdie

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
Architect and 2016 National Design Award winner for Lifetime Achievement Moshe Safdie discusses the four design principles that have guided his work over the past five decades and how they relate to the evolution of architecture in the era of globalization. Safdie sheds light on the ramifications of “megascale” and “megastructure,” examining scale, site, buildability,...

“Mega” Architecture: An Evening with Moshe Safdie

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Architect and 2016 National Design Award winner for Lifetime Achievement Moshe Safdie discusses the four design principles that have guided his work over the past five decades and how they relate to the evolution of architecture in the era of globalization. Safdie sheds light on the ramifications of “megascale” and “megastructure,” examining scale, site, buildability, and purpose in residential, commercial, and institutional projects in the context of the work of contemporary architecture.

“Without Light Everything is Lifeless”

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
Image features a pitcher composed of a globular, translucent green glass body with a cylindrical neck covered in silver-plated metal with an inverted U-shaped handle, short spout, and an inset circular lid. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.Designer Massimo Vignelli was known for the sense of sophistication and refinement he brought to the product, graphic, and furniture design that he produced first in Italy, and later in the U.S. working with his wife Lella, also a designer.  While a student at the School of Architecture in Venice, Vignelli learned about glass from architect and glass...

wood Stove and Axe [painting] / (photographed by Walter Rosenblum)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

1 photographic print : b&w, 8 x 10 in.

1 negative ; 4 x 5 in.

woman standing in the middle of a dirt road

National Museum of American History

whiteonwhite:algorithmicnoir

Smithsonian American Art Museum
The core of the Rufus Corporation’s “expedition to unravel utopian promise” would become this digital cinema installation whiteonwhite:algorithmicnoic. It is an experimental film composed from two screens: one reflecting the “movie” and one depicting the computer program behind the movie. In making the film, the collective traveled between Moscow and the Caspian Sea, compiling a cinematic record of the landscape, environment, and architecture while filming in local cafes, apartment blocks, and industrial plants. An audio/visual library comprised of 3,000 film clips, 80 voice-overs, and 150 pieces of music forms the basis of an improvised film noir.

A non-linear narrative unfolds through the observations and surveillance of the central protagonist, Holz, who finds himself living in a dystopian futuropolis. Further provoking cinematic form, the film’s presentation is edited in real time by a custom-programmed computer that Sussman has labeled the “serendipity machine.” The artwork is driven by key words that appear on the secondary screen and delivers a changing narrative that runs indefinitely, never playing the same sequence twice. The unexpected juxtapositions of voice, image, and sound create a sense of unyielding suspense that continuously divorces the protagonist from the full course of his own narrative.

Watch This!: Revelations in Media Art, 2015

von Martens Rooftop View of Paris

National Museum of American History
A Friedrich von Martens panoramic silver albumen print ca. 1844-1856. The photograph is a view of Paris from a rooftop. The Arc de Triomphe can be seen in the distance on the right side. The River Seine is on the left. Many boats are docked on the left bank of the river. An ornate pillar is in the left hand corner of the photograph.

The Friederich von Martens collection in the Photographic History Collection is composed of thirty-eight albumen photographs. Included in the collection is a set of mechanical drawings, patent information and personal correspondence related to von Martens’s panoramic camera and photographs. Many of the photographs in this collection are of Paris in the mid-1800s. There are also photographs of drawings and paintings.

Friederich von Martens was born in Germany in 1809, but spent most of his life living and working in Paris, France. Not much is known about his life before he left Germany. In Paris, von Martens was a prominent and respected photographer. He photographed both seascapes and city scenes. He also traveled to many other cities such as Frankfurt, Lausanne, Le Havre, Rouen, Stuttgart, Trieste and Venice. He exhibited his work in Paris at the Salon from 1834 to 1848. In 1845, von Martens invented the first panoramic camera, called the Megaskop-Kamera. The camera featured a swing lens and operated by a handle and gears. The first model used 4.7" x 15" curved daguerreotype plates that had a 150 degree arc. A later model used wet plate curved glass emulsions. The curved plate design made development of the plates difficult, however von Martens managed to produce many high quality panoramas. In 1851 he had a chance to exhibit a number of albumen prints of architectural views at the Great Exhibition in London, for which he was awarded the Council Medal. In the 1850s von Martens decided to try taking panoramic photographs using talbotypes instead of daguerreotypes. He tried his new idea while photographing the Alps. One of these photographs, taken of Mont Blanc, in 14 parts, was exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1855. Von Martens died in 1875.

von Martens Panoramic View of the River Seine

National Museum of American History
A Friedrich von Martens panoramic silver albumen print ca. 1844-1856. Taken in Paris in the mid-nineteenth century, the photograph is of the Louvre as seen from the opposite bank of the River Seine. A barge floats on the river close to the left bank. In the street there are two horse drawn cariages and one empty parked carriage. Buildings and shops line the street. Two of these buildings, located on adjacent corners, are print shops. One sign reads 'Delauney F. Danlos Editeur.' In the distance the Arc de Triomphe can be seen.

The Friederich von Martens collection in the Photographic History Collection is composed of thirty-eight albumen photographs. Included in the collection is a set of mechanical drawings, patent information and personal correspondence related to von Martens’s panoramic camera and photographs. Many of the photographs in this collection are of Paris in the mid-1800s. There are also photographs of drawings and paintings.

Friederich von Martens was born in Germany in 1809, but spent most of his life living and working in Paris, France. Not much is known about his life before he left Germany. In Paris, von Martens was a prominent and respected photographer. He photographed both seascapes and city scenes. He also traveled to many other cities such as Frankfurt, Lausanne, Le Havre, Rouen, Stuttgart, Trieste and Venice. He exhibited his work in Paris at the Salon from 1834 to 1848. In 1845, von Martens invented the first panoramic camera, called the Megaskop-Kamera. The camera featured a swing lens and operated by a handle and gears. The first model used 4.7" x 15" curved daguerreotype plates that had a 150 degree arc. A later model used wet plate curved glass emulsions. The curved plate design made development of the plates difficult, however von Martens managed to produce many high quality panoramas. In 1851 he had a chance to exhibit a number of albumen prints of architectural views at the Great Exhibition in London, for which he was awarded the Council Medal. In the 1850s von Martens decided to try taking panoramic photographs using talbotypes instead of daguerreotypes. He tried his new idea while photographing the Alps. One of these photographs, taken of Mont Blanc, in 14 parts, was exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1855. Von Martens died in 1875.

von Martens Panoramic View of the Louvre

National Museum of American History
A Friedrich von Martens panoramic silver albumen print looking across the River Seine to the Louvre ca. 1844-1856. There is construction being done on the same bank as the Louvre. A barge floating on the right side reads "Ecole De Natation Du Louvre Pour Hommes. Entree .50$" Translated in English this reads "Swimming School at the Louvre for Men- .50$" On the left side of the photograph a carriage carrying two barrels is parked on the street.

The Friederich von Martens collection in the Photographic History Collection is composed of thirty-eight albumen photographs. Included in the collection is a set of mechanical drawings, patent information and personal correspondence related to von Martens’s panoramic camera and photographs. Many of the photographs in this collection are of Paris in the mid-1800s. There are also photographs of drawings and paintings.

Friederich von Martens was born in Germany in 1809, but spent most of his life living and working in Paris, France. Not much is known about his life before he left Germany. In Paris, von Martens was a prominent and respected photographer. He photographed both seascapes and city scenes. He also traveled to many other cities such as Frankfurt, Lausanne, Le Havre, Rouen, Stuttgart, Trieste and Venice. He exhibited his work in Paris at the Salon from 1834 to 1848. In 1845, von Martens invented the first panoramic camera, called the Megaskop-Kamera. The camera featured a swing lens and operated by a handle and gears. The first model used 4.7" x 15" curved daguerreotype plates that had a 150 degree arc. A later model used wet plate curved glass emulsions. The curved plate design made development of the plates difficult, however von Martens managed to produce many high quality panoramas. In 1851 he had a chance to exhibit a number of albumen prints of architectural views at the Great Exhibition in London, for which he was awarded the Council Medal. In the 1850s von Martens decided to try taking panoramic photographs using talbotypes instead of daguerreotypes. He tried his new idea while photographing the Alps. One of these photographs, taken of Mont Blanc, in 14 parts, was exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1855. Von Martens died in 1875.

von Martens Panoramic View of The Louvre

National Museum of American History
A Friedrich von Martens panoramic silver albumen print ca. 1844-1856. The Louvre from across the River Seine. On the street in front of the museum there is a line of early automobiles. In the left hand corner there is a building with ornate pillars. In the distance The Arc de Triomphe can be seen. On the river there are some small boats and further down a barge can be seen adorned with an advertisment "Ecole De Natation Du Louvre Pour Hommes Entree .50."

The Friederich von Martens collection in the Photographic History Collection is composed of thirty-eight albumen photographs. Included in the collection is a set of mechanical drawings, patent information and personal correspondence related to von Martens’s panoramic camera and photographs. Many of the photographs in this collection are of Paris in the mid-1800s. There are also photographs of drawings and paintings.

Friederich von Martens was born in Germany in 1809, but spent most of his life living and working in Paris, France. Not much is known about his life before he left Germany. In Paris, von Martens was a prominent and respected photographer. He photographed both seascapes and city scenes. He also traveled to many other cities such as Frankfurt, Lausanne, Le Havre, Rouen, Stuttgart, Trieste and Venice. He exhibited his work in Paris at the Salon from 1834 to 1848. In 1845, von Martens invented the first panoramic camera, called the Megaskop-Kamera. The camera featured a swing lens and operated by a handle and gears. The first model used 4.7" x 15" curved daguerreotype plates that had a 150 degree arc. A later model used wet plate curved glass emulsions. The curved plate design made development of the plates difficult, however von Martens managed to produce many high quality panoramas. In 1851 he had a chance to exhibit a number of albumen prints of architectural views at the Great Exhibition in London, for which he was awarded the Council Medal. In the 1850s von Martens decided to try taking panoramic photographs using talbotypes instead of daguerreotypes. He tried his new idea while photographing the Alps. One of these photographs, taken of Mont Blanc, in 14 parts, was exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1855. Von Martens died in 1875.

von Martens Panoramic View of Ruins

National Museum of American History
A Friedrich von Martens panoramic silver albumen print ca. 1844-1856. The photograph is of the ruins of buildings in an unknown location. Semi-intact buildings are on the right side of the photograph,completely demolished remains are on the left side. There are two individuals by a battered fence in the mid-left area. There is construction and a group of people in the lower left corner. The word 'Dopter' is writen on a sign hanging on a building on the left side of the photograph.

The Friederich von Martens collection in the Photographic History Collection is composed of thirty-eight albumen photographs. Included in the collection is a set of mechanical drawings, patent information and personal correspondence related to von Martens’s panoramic camera and photographs. Many of the photographs in this collection are of Paris in the mid-1800s. There are also photographs of drawings and paintings.

Friederich von Martens was born in Germany in 1809, but spent most of his life living and working in Paris, France. Not much is known about his life before he left Germany. In Paris, von Martens was a prominent and respected photographer. He photographed both seascapes and city scenes. He also traveled to many other cities such as Frankfurt, Lausanne, Le Havre, Rouen, Stuttgart, Trieste and Venice. He exhibited his work in Paris at the Salon from 1834 to 1848. In 1845, von Martens invented the first panoramic camera, called the Megaskop-Kamera. The camera featured a swing lens and operated by a handle and gears. The first model used 4.7" x 15" curved daguerreotype plates that had a 150 degree arc. A later model used wet plate curved glass emulsions. The curved plate design made development of the plates difficult, however von Martens managed to produce many high quality panoramas. In 1851 he had a chance to exhibit a number of albumen prints of architectural views at the Great Exhibition in London, for which he was awarded the Council Medal. In the 1850s von Martens decided to try taking panoramic photographs using talbotypes instead of daguerreotypes. He tried his new idea while photographing the Alps. One of these photographs, taken of Mont Blanc, in 14 parts, was exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1855. Von Martens died in 1875.

von Martens Panoramic View of Paris with Courtyard

National Museum of American History
A Friedrich von Martens panoramic silver albumen print ca. 1844-1856. Taken in Paris, the photograph is of a courtyard/park behind a large building. A wall on the lower right side reads "Ettres et Science." In the distance the Paris cityscape can be seen.

The Friederich von Martens collection in the Photographic History Collection is composed of thirty-eight albumen photographs. Included in the collection is a set of mechanical drawings, patent information and personal correspondence related to von Martens’s panoramic camera and photographs. Many of the photographs in this collection are of Paris in the mid-1800s. There are also photographs of drawings and paintings.

Friederich von Martens was born in Germany in 1809, but spent most of his life living and working in Paris, France. Not much is known about his life before he left Germany. In Paris, von Martens was a prominent and respected photographer. He photographed both seascapes and city scenes. He also traveled to many other cities such as Frankfurt, Lausanne, Le Havre, Rouen, Stuttgart, Trieste and Venice. He exhibited his work in Paris at the Salon from 1834 to 1848. In 1845, von Martens invented the first panoramic camera, called the Megaskop-Kamera. The camera featured a swing lens and operated by a handle and gears. The first model used 4.7" x 15" curved daguerreotype plates that had a 150 degree arc. A later model used wet plate curved glass emulsions. The curved plate design made development of the plates difficult, however von Martens managed to produce many high quality panoramas. In 1851 he had a chance to exhibit a number of albumen prints of architectural views at the Great Exhibition in London, for which he was awarded the Council Medal. In the 1850s von Martens decided to try taking panoramic photographs using talbotypes instead of daguerreotypes. He tried his new idea while photographing the Alps. One of these photographs, taken of Mont Blanc, in 14 parts, was exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1855. Von Martens died in 1875.

von Martens Panoramic View of Paris Neighborhood with Ruins

National Museum of American History
A Friedrich von Martens panoramic silver albumen print ca. 1844-1856. Taken in Paris, this photograph is of a neighborhood in rubble. On the left side of the photograph there is what appears to be the remains of a building. Individuals can be seen amongst the waste. In the center of the photograph is the profile of a building with an advertisment "Vasseur-Osteologie et Danatomie" and "Hotel Universatie Meuble." At the bottom right advertisments for "vetemens" and "neogens" hang on another building. In the distance there are the tops of cathedrals.

The Friederich von Martens collection in the Photographic History Collection is composed of thirty-eight albumen photographs. Included in the collection is a set of mechanical drawings, patent information and personal correspondence related to von Martens’s panoramic camera and photographs. Many of the photographs in this collection are of Paris in the mid-1800s. There are also photographs of drawings and paintings.

Friederich von Martens was born in Germany in 1809, but spent most of his life living and working in Paris, France. Not much is known about his life before he left Germany. In Paris, von Martens was a prominent and respected photographer. He photographed both seascapes and city scenes. He also traveled to many other cities such as Frankfurt, Lausanne, Le Havre, Rouen, Stuttgart, Trieste and Venice. He exhibited his work in Paris at the Salon from 1834 to 1848. In 1845, von Martens invented the first panoramic camera, called the Megaskop-Kamera. The camera featured a swing lens and operated by a handle and gears. The first model used 4.7" x 15" curved daguerreotype plates that had a 150 degree arc. A later model used wet plate curved glass emulsions. The curved plate design made development of the plates difficult, however von Martens managed to produce many high quality panoramas. In 1851 he had a chance to exhibit a number of albumen prints of architectural views at the Great Exhibition in London, for which he was awarded the Council Medal. In the 1850s von Martens decided to try taking panoramic photographs using talbotypes instead of daguerreotypes. He tried his new idea while photographing the Alps. One of these photographs, taken of Mont Blanc, in 14 parts, was exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1855. Von Martens died in 1875.

von Martens Panoramic View of Field and Mountains

National Museum of American History
A Friedrich von Martens panoramic silver albumen print ca. 1844-1856. It is the view from the base of a mountain looking up towards the peak. From the base we see a trail leading up the mountain. There are several wood encampments visable along the way up. In the foreground a patch of land is seperated into different crops. The snow capped summit is in the distance.

The Friederich von Martens collection in the Photographic History Collection is composed of thirty-eight albumen photographs. Included in the collection is a set of mechanical drawings, patent information and personal correspondence related to von Martens’s panoramic camera and photographs. Many of the photographs in this collection are of Paris in the mid-1800s. There are also photographs of drawings and paintings.

Friederich von Martens was born in Germany in 1809, but spent most of his life living and working in Paris, France. Not much is known about his life before he left Germany. In Paris, von Martens was a prominent and respected photographer. He photographed both seascapes and city scenes. He also traveled to many other cities such as Frankfurt, Lausanne, Le Havre, Rouen, Stuttgart, Trieste and Venice. He exhibited his work in Paris at the Salon from 1834 to 1848. In 1845, von Martens invented the first panoramic camera, called the Megaskop-Kamera. The camera featured a swing lens and operated by a handle and gears. The first model used 4.7" x 15" curved daguerreotype plates that had a 150 degree arc. A later model used wet plate curved glass emulsions. The curved plate design made development of the plates difficult, however von Martens managed to produce many high quality panoramas. In 1851 he had a chance to exhibit a number of albumen prints of architectural views at the Great Exhibition in London, for which he was awarded the Council Medal. In the 1850s von Martens decided to try taking panoramic photographs using talbotypes instead of daguerreotypes. He tried his new idea while photographing the Alps. One of these photographs, taken of Mont Blanc, in 14 parts, was exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1855. Von Martens died in 1875.

von Martens Panoramic View down the River Seine

National Museum of American History
A Friedrich von Martens panoramic silver albumen print ca. 1844-1856. The photograph, taken in Paris is a view looking down the River Seine from the right bank. On the lower right side there is a line of parked carriages. On the mid-right side there is a statue overlooking the river. Floating on the river are six empty barges. On the left bank there are rows of shops, apparently of a medical nature. One has a sign that reads "Dents 5 francs" and another "Mason de'l'ingenieur chevallier opticien."

The Friederich von Martens collection in the Photographic History Collection is composed of thirty-eight albumen photographs. Included in the collection is a set of mechanical drawings, patent information and personal correspondence related to von Martens’s panoramic camera and photographs. Many of the photographs in this collection are of Paris in the mid-1800s. There are also photographs of drawings and paintings.

Friederich von Martens was born in Germany in 1809, but spent most of his life living and working in Paris, France. Not much is known about his life before he left Germany. In Paris, von Martens was a prominent and respected photographer. He photographed both seascapes and city scenes. He also traveled to many other cities such as Frankfurt, Lausanne, Le Havre, Rouen, Stuttgart, Trieste and Venice. He exhibited his work in Paris at the Salon from 1834 to 1848. In 1845, von Martens invented the first panoramic camera, called the Megaskop-Kamera. The camera featured a swing lens and operated by a handle and gears. The first model used 4.7" x 15" curved daguerreotype plates that had a 150 degree arc. A later model used wet plate curved glass emulsions. The curved plate design made development of the plates difficult, however von Martens managed to produce many high quality panoramas. In 1851 he had a chance to exhibit a number of albumen prints of architectural views at the Great Exhibition in London, for which he was awarded the Council Medal. In the 1850s von Martens decided to try taking panoramic photographs using talbotypes instead of daguerreotypes. He tried his new idea while photographing the Alps. One of these photographs, taken of Mont Blanc, in 14 parts, was exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1855. Von Martens died in 1875.

von Martens Megaskop Panoramic Camera Patent Document

National Museum of American History
A duplicate patent document for Friedrich von Marten's Megaskop Panoramic Camera ca. 1854. The document opens to be a booklet. The top caption begins "Memoire descriptif...", the English translation is "Descriptive memoir..."

The Friedrich von Martens collection in the Photographic History Collection is composed of thirty-eight albumen photographs. Included in the collection is a set of mechanical drawings, patent information and personal correspondence related to von Martens’s panoramic camera and photographs. Many of the photographs in this collection are of Paris in the mid-1800s. There are also photographs of drawings and paintings.

Friedrich von Martens was born in Germany in 1809, but spent most of his life living and working in Paris, France. Not much is known about his life before he left Germany. In Paris, von Martens was a prominent and respected photographer. He photographed both seascapes and city scenes. He also traveled to many other cities such as Frankfurt, Lausanne, Le Havre, Rouen, Stuttgart, Trieste and Venice. He exhibited his work in Paris at the Salon from 1834 to 1848. In 1845, von Martens invented the first panoramic camera, called the Megaskop-Kamera. The camera featured a swing lens and operated by a handle and gears. The first model used 4.7" x 15" curved daguerreotype plates that had a 150 degree arc. A later model used wet plate curved glass emulsions. The curved plate design made development of the plates difficult, however von Martens managed to produce many high quality panoramas. In 1851 he had a chance to exhibit a number of albumen prints of architectural views at the Great Exhibition in London, for which he was awarded the Council Medal. In the 1850s von Martens decided to try taking panoramic photographs using talbotypes instead of daguerreotypes. He tried his new idea while photographing the Alps. One of these photographs, taken of Mont Blanc, in 14 parts, was exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1855. Von Martens died in 1875.

von Marten's Camera Patent Document

National Museum of American History
A duplicate patent document for Friedrich von Marten's Megaskop Panoramic Camera ca. 1854. The document opens to become a booklet. The top caption begins "Memoire descriptif...", the English translation is "Descriptive memoir..."

The Friederich von Martens collection in the Photographic History Collection is composed of thirty-eight albumen photographs. Included in the collection is a set of mechanical drawings, patent information and personal correspondence related to von Martens’s panoramic camera and photographs. Many of the photographs in this collection are of Paris in the mid-1800s. There are also photographs of drawings and paintings.

Friederich von Martens was born in Germany in 1809, but spent most of his life living and working in Paris, France. Not much is known about his life before he left Germany. In Paris, von Martens was a prominent and respected photographer. He photographed both seascapes and city scenes. He also traveled to many other cities such as Frankfurt, Lausanne, Le Havre, Rouen, Stuttgart, Trieste and Venice. He exhibited his work in Paris at the Salon from 1834 to 1848. In 1845, von Martens invented the first panoramic camera, called the Megaskop-Kamera. The camera featured a swing lens and operated by a handle and gears. The first model used 4.7" x 15" curved daguerreotype plates that had a 150 degree arc. A later model used wet plate curved glass emulsions. The curved plate design made development of the plates difficult, however von Martens managed to produce many high quality panoramas. In 1851 he had a chance to exhibit a number of albumen prints of architectural views at the Great Exhibition in London, for which he was awarded the Council Medal. In the 1850s von Martens decided to try taking panoramic photographs using talbotypes instead of daguerreotypes. He tried his new idea while photographing the Alps. One of these photographs, taken of Mont Blanc, in 14 parts, was exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1855. Von Martens died in 1875.

untitled

National Museum of American History

untitled

National Museum of American History
Press print; likely German houses; shutter hole in shape of heart; broken windows; ivy and tree in foreground; image of a large home; inscription on back has been partially cut off

unknown Cathedral

National Museum of American History

unidentified city street

National Museum of American History

unidentified building

National Museum of American History

unidentified architectural model

National Museum of American History
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