Skip to Content

Found 7,531 Resources

Untitled (Building with Bricked Exterior)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Exterior Grotto, Aldberg

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Sketch, Urban Exterior with Classical Architecture and Draped Figures

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Sketch, Urban Exterior with Classical Architecture and Draped Figures. Seated leader at center right, with supplicant (?) figures at lower center with reclining figure with child nearby.

Exterior with Classical Architecture and Figures with Musical Instruments

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Exterior with Classical Architecture and Figures with Musical Instruments.

Exterior Drawing of "New" NASM Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958 President Eisenhower authorizes the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets, S.W., Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. A 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected.. However, this initial design was later modified. In July 1966 President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

Featured in the "Torch," September 1972

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design see Neg. SIA2017-018112 through 018119, SIA2017-018122, and 94-2479. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum, search Aeronautical Museums 1949, 1955, 1962, and HOK's preliminary design of 1964..

Exterior drawing of the Independence Avenue side for the new National Air and Space Museum designed by HOK.

The Architecture of Light (Galveston, Texas)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Concept Drawing of Exterior for National Air & Space Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Drawing of the exterior on the Independence Avenue side of the new National Air and Space Museum shows the seven solid facades with four having slender upper windows.

Concept Drawing of Exterior for National Air & Space Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. See also Neg. SIA2017-018095 through SIA2017-018101 for initial design by HOK. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Drawing of the exterior on the Jefferson Drive (north) side of the new National Air and Space Museum shows the four solid sections of the facade and the three banks of windows.

Concept Drawing of Exterior for National Air & Space Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Drawing of the exterior the new National Air and Space Museum is of the north facade of the Mall front of the building as viewed from Jefferson Drive.

Classical Architecture [painting] / (photographed by Walter Rosenblum)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

Photographed for: Rose Fried Gallery.

1 photographic print : b&w, 8 x 10 in.

1 negative ; 4 x 5 in.

Building Exterior [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

Hedda Sterne papers, Archives of American Art, 1944-1970.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

copy 1 negative: Safety, BW.

Street Scene, Tangier (Crenelated Architecture)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Abstract Architecture [drawing] / (photographed by Walter Rosenblum)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

Photographed for: Bertha Schaeffer.

1 photographic print : b&w, 8 x 10 in.

1 negative ; 4 x 5 in.

Exterior of Renwick Gallery (19th c.)

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Original in SIA. Currently copy neg being made at SIA (January 1995).

In 1972, with the acquisition of the building by the Smithsonian Institution, the National Collection of Fine Arts, now the Smithsonian American Art Museum, gained additional gallery space and the building was renamed the Renwick Gallery of Art.

Stereoscopic view of the exterior of the original Corcoran Gallery of Art designed by architect, James Renwick, Jr., and erected between 1859 and 1861 for William Wilson Corcoran's collection of paintings and sculpture. Statues by Moses Ezekiel are visible in niches along the south facade. The statues were installed in 1884, but were sold off the building in 1901. An awning covers one of the first story windows.

Figures Seated in an Exterior [art work] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

No Title Given: Exterior of a House, [art work] / (photographed by Walter Rosenblum)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

1 photographic print : b&w, 8 x 10 in.

1 negative ; 4 x 5 in.

Refurbishment of Renwick Exterior

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in TORCH, January 1986

The Renwick Gallery, part of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, with the sandstone trim stripped away for this 1985 restoration. The building, designed by James Renwick, Jr., was built between 1859 and 1861 to house the Corcoran Gallery of Art. The Corcoran Gallery moved to its present building in 1899. The building was then occupied by the U.S. Court of Claims until 1964. On June 23, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson approved the use of the building as a Smithsonian gallery of arts, crafts, and design. The building is located at 17th and Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.

Architectural Cadence

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Concept Drawing of Exterior for National Air & Space Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. See also Neg. SIA2017-018095 through SIA2017-018101 for initial design by HOK. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

Drawing of the exterior the National Air and Space Museum is of the north facade of the Mall side of the building and the east end as viewed from Jefferson Drive.

Concept Drawing of Exterior for National Air Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

The original design was revised and this final design is a drawing of an exterior view for the new National Air Museum (now known as the National Air and Space Museum), designed by Gyo Obata of Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK). The drawing is of the outside facade of the museum on the Mall side and shows people on the walkway and the United States Capitol in the distance.

M. M. Van Beuren House (Newport, RI), Exterior Drive [drawing] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Lindeberg, H. T.?.

Jerusalem

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Concept Model of Exterior for the New National Air Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

See also Neg. SIA2017-018095 through SIA2017-018101 for initial design by HOK. For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

As viewed from Independence Avenue SW, an early concept model shows the full length exterior of the front for the new National Air Museum building (now known as the National Air and Space Museum), designed by Gyo Obata of Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum. In this design for a "Museum for the Space Age", the windows are dark, but the center window is light. The Wright Brothers airplane is visible inside the building.

Concept Model of Exterior for National Air & Space Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Model of the exterior the new National Air and Space Museum along Jefferson Drive shows the four solid facades and the three window facades.
1-24 of 7,531 Resources