Skip to Content

Found 4,018 Resources

Airplanes

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Long Beach Pike (Airplanes)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Looking at Airplanes

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Self-guided tour of the National Air and Space Museum during which students will learn about the science of flight by observing aircraft on display.

The Segway of Airplanes

Smithsonian Channel
The Hiller Flying Platform had the potential to be a space age personal flying machine. But it didn't quite take off. From: UNBELIEVABLE FLYING OBJECTS http://bit.ly/1phbGL5

Pin, Lapel, Waco Airplanes

National Air and Space Museum
Waco Airplane Co. lapel pin; single piece gold trimmed white enameled wings with oval center; blue enamel letter text "WACO" on oval; gold letter text "AIRPLANES" below oval.

Pin, Lapel, Waco Airplanes

National Air and Space Museum
Waco Airplane Co. lapel pin; single piece stamped gold wings with embossed letter text "WACO AIRPLANES" at center.

Could Garbage Fuel Airplanes?

Smithsonian Magazine

Twenty miles east of Reno, Nevada, garbage trucks skip the landfill and stop at Fulcrum BioEnergy, where tons of egg shells, coffee grinds, mattresses and other refuse are dumped into a large holding area.

Two hours later, this garbage leaves the facility transformed into jet fuel, as part of an ambitious effort funded by private investors and the federal government to create cheap green energy.  

“We’re producing a newer alternative, cleaner-burning fuel that the market demands, and we’re doing it in a manner that saves money for consumers and makes a profit for our investors,” says Fulcrum BioEnergy president and CEO Jim Macias. “It feels real good to be able to help our government and military with what they consider important national security agenda and issues.”

Fulcrum BioEnergy converts household trash into biofuel for airplanes. The company’s Reno processing plant will be fully operational by second quarter of 2019, and Fulcrum has already partnered with several waste management companies to save garbage from landfills and cut their own input costs.

Fulcrum operated a demonstration plant in North Carolina where, motivated by investor demand for a cheap renewable fuel, it started testing turning trash to fuel in 2014. After about three years of trying, the company developed a successful process for converting municipal solid waste to energy. From that point on, their business pivoted.  

“Let’s face it—there will never, ever be a shortage of garbage,” the Fulcrum website reads. Indeed, the average American produces about 4.5 pounds of trash per day. One way to use this waste for profit is to create a super fuel. 

A dumpster is tipped into Fulcrum's Sierra Processing Plant. (Fulcrum BioEnergy)

Once garbage is delivered to Fulcrum’s Sierra Processing Plant, pushers guide the waste down a conveyer belt that shreds it into two-inch long pieces. Workers clad in traffic vests, thick gloves and safety goggles help pull paper, wood, fabrics and textiles from this shredded pile—only organic materials can be used to create fuel.

This shredded garbage, or feedstock, is then sent over to the biorefinery, where it undergoes a “gasification” process that involves heating waste under pressure to produce synthesis gas, which is a combination of carbon monoxide, methane, hydrogen and carbon dioxide.

From there, the synthesis gas enters a tube in which the gas reacts with a secret catalyst to condense into liquid fuel—a step called the Fischer-Tropsch process.

“It meets all of the same performance criteria” as petroleum, says Joanne Ivancic, executive director of the advocacy group Advanced Biofuels USA. “Renewable jet fuel is cleaner, runs cooler, and they say they’ll probably have less maintenance when they use renewable jet fuel because it’s not as hard on the engines.”

Inside the facility, the garbage is sent down a conveyor belt to be processed. (Fulcrum BioEnergy)

Depending on the waste partner agreement, Fulcrum pays nothing, or close-to-nothing, for the garbage that starts its process. United Airlines, the Hong Kong-based Cathay Pacific airline and Air BP are all equity investors in Fulcrum, and have long-term jet fuel supply agreements in place to buy a combined 175 million gallons per year once the plants start production.

The Department of Agriculture has also guaranteed more than $105 million in loans for Fulcrum to develop this new facility. The Department of Defense too granted Fulcrum $70 million in 2014.

“The objective is to benefit our country in terms of energy independence, and remove dependence from petrol, and create jobs and economic development in rural communities,” says Mark Brodziski, deputy administrator of energy programs for USDA Rural Development.

Soma Bhadra, CEO of Proteus Consulting, which works with biofuel companies, says government funding and private investment are spurring growth for companies like Fulcrum, but wonders whether consumer demand is strong enough to inspire airlines to invest in biofuels.

She says Fulcrum has an advantage over other municipal solid waste companies because its fuel can compete with the cheap fossil fuels. According to Fulcrum, its fuel production costs less than $1 per gallon, which is 50 percent less than the average price of oil, according to the Department of Energy.

Cheap oil is an issue that has plagued biofuels companies like Solena Group, which transforms biomass such as municipal solid waste, grass and wood into energy.

“They were getting ready to put something together in the U.K. but with gas so cheap, they couldn’t compete,” Ivancic says of Solena.

Ivancic said Fulcrum is one of the only municipal solid waste energy companies to be fully funded, although she says she wonders how sustainable Fulcrum’s pricing really is.

“Municipal solid waste is not consistent every day,” Ivancic says. “What comes in isn’t exactly the way it was the day before so all your processes need to be very flexible or you need a broad approach. I’d guess the folks at Fulcrum are challenged with how they’re dealing with using MSW.”

Fulcrum Vice President of Administration Rick Barraza says that the individual items used to generate the company’s fuel aren’t as important as the sum of the carbon content collected. The amount of carbon Fulcrum gets from its wood, paper, plastics and textile waste is generally steady. 

“With this consistent amount of carbon, the production of fuel will remain fairly consistent,” he says.  

Once Fulcrum’s plant is active, the company plans to transform about 200,000 tons of garbage into about 11 million gallons of fuel per year. Independent emissions consultants from the USDA say Fulcrum’s fuel is 80 percent cleaner than petroleum. The electricity generated during the process is also used to power the Sierra Plant.

Fulcrum plans to build more plants in Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle, Denver, Houston and New Jersey by 2022. For now, though, the company is focusing on turning more garbage trucks into its Reno facility, rather than the nearby landfill.

“It’s a neat idea, it’s an exciting idea and, more important, it’s an idea that works,” Barraza says of the new fuel.

Editor's Note, March 22, 2017: This article originally contained a quote that made an unsubstantiated claim that Cathay Pacific may increase the cost of their tickets because of their decision to use biofuel. We have removed the offending quote.

airplane

National Museum of American History

airplane

National Museum of American History

Arts and Industries Exhibits, China & Airplanes

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Interior view of the Arts and Industries Building showing the porcelain exhibits in cases on the floor and gallery, and two airplanes hang from the ceiling. Portraits line the wall above the exhibit cases on the right side of the picture. Exhibit cases of postage stamps are at the back of the hall. Photograph was probably taken in the 1920s or 1930s.

Living in the Age of Airplanes

Smithsonian Institution
Living in the Age of Airplanes is a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Not long ago,traveling between continents was a migration. Now, on any given day, 100,000 flights transport people and things between any two points on Earth in a matter of hours. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it explores the countless ways aviation affects our lives (even when we don't fly). With stunning visuals, the film renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world. Narrated by Harrison Ford. Now playing at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center's Airbus IMAX Theater. Visit website for showtimes and tickets: http://www.si.edu/Imax/Movie/164

America by Air Webisode 1 - Airplanes

National Air and Space Museum
This series of educational webisodes focuses on subjects covered in the "America by Air" exhibition at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC.

Insignia of Military Airplanes of Various Countries

National Air and Space Museum
Relief or Letterpress with insignia of Military Airplanes of Various Countries. Multicolor illustrated print providing an airplane identification aid. On an off-white background, twelve line drawings of airplanes with wing, tail, and body insignias and text in Japanese naming each country's aircraft. A black line interrupted by characters at top and on the right surrounds the drawings. Additional characters at bottom.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Copyright Disclosure for Orphaned Works

Whenever possible, the museum provides factual information about copyright owners and related matters in its records and other texts related to the collections. For many of the images in this collection, some of which were created for or by corporate entities that no longer exist, the museum does not own any copyrights. Therefore, it generally does not grant or deny permission to copy, distribute or otherwise use material in this collection. If identified, permission and possible fees may be required from the copyright owner independently of the museum. It is the user's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other use restrictions when copying, distributing or otherwise using materials found in the museum's collections. Transmission or reproduction of protected materials beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Users must make their own assessments of rights in light of their intended use.

If you have any more information about an item you've seen in the Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection, or if you are a copyright owner and believe we have not properly attributed your work to you or have used it without permission, we want to hear from you. Please contact pisanod@si.edu with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

View more information about the Smithsonian's general copyright policies at http://www.si.edu/termsofuse

Will Commercial Airplanes Have Parachutes Someday?

Smithsonian Magazine

Statistically speaking, the chance of dying in a plane crash is one in about 11 million. Yet, despite significant safety advances that make the likelihood of such a nightmare scenario ever more remote, there’s always that looming fear. But what if passenger airplanes were equipped with parachutes that, during an emergency, allowed them to float safely towards a soft landing?

Ballistic Recovery Systems is the one of the few companies to show that such an idea is indeed plausible. Beginning in 1998, the Saint Paul, Minnesota-based firm has outfitted several small, lightweight aircraft with backup parachutes designed to support as much as 4,000 pounds. Tucked in the rear of the fuselage, the BRS system is activated simply by pulling a red lever that releases a rocket-launched capsule containing a large canopy chute. Once deployed, the suspension lines expand at a controlled rate, allowing the canopy to open fully as the plane's speed slows.

For inventor and BRS founder Boris Popov, adapting something that's used mainly by skydivers and military personnel for flying objects that are several times heavier meant that he had to first come up with a much wider design. He then had to reduce the parachute's bulk and weight without sacrificing structural integrity. His $16,000 rescue parachutes, found in personal aircraft like Cessnas and the entire line of Cirus planes, are comprised of an ultra-lightweight composite material that is five times stronger than steel, but 100 times lighter. The 30-pound parachute is then condensed into a compact package using an 11-ton hydraulic press. The "ballistics" part comes in the form of a rocket motor with about a pound of explosive material, enough to blast the parachute through a fiberglass panel in the rear of the airplane so that the canopy can deploy within seconds. At last count, the company claims their technology has saved nearly 300 lives.

Inevitably, the question becomes whether the technology can be applied to larger commercial aircraft, such as Boeings and Airbus models, to assuage the fears of the billions of airline passengers that travel every year. Well, Popov believes it's definitely doable if the public wills it to happen.

By Popov's calculations, every pound of descending weight requires about a square foot of parachute material for such a system to work. A passenger-loaded Boeing 757 can weigh as much as 250,000 pounds and cruises at around 500 miles per hour. Safely lowering a plane of this size and weight would mean employing multiple BRS parachutes (as many as 21 for a jumbo-sized ,735,000-pound Boeing 747) . One approach to making this more feasible is to engineer an aircraft that can separate into smaller segments. That way, only the passenger cabin would be braced during a freefall. Under this scenario, the wings and other components would detach to shed weight quickly.

It’s an idea that a team of researchers at the Scientific Research Institute of Parachute Design and Production (NII Parachutostroyeniya) in Russia has been exploring for some time. One conceptual blueprint even involves an aircraft designed to automatically sear off its wings using automated blades while the passenger-carrying sections would break off into parachute-equipped survival pods. In a special BBC report, the institute’s chief designer Viktor Lyalin explains that this type of system would “drastically reduce speed and avoid human casualties during take-off and landing accidents."

Implementing such an extreme safety measure, however, may not even be practical considering that aviation experts still question the effectiveness of using parachutes. For instance, a spokesman for the UK Civil Aviation Authority tells the BBC that even in the incredibly unlikely scenario that an airplane stalls in mid-air, there probably wouldn't be enough time for a parachute to deploy as the plane is moving at high speeds. And since most fatal accidents occur during the takeoff or approach and landing phase of the flight, a scenario where a parachute might make a difference is rather remote.

Unphased by skeptics, BRS is working, for now, to further develop the technology to a point where it can be used in private jets and other larger aircraft that seat up to 20 passengers.

CEO Robert Nelson tells The Wall Street Transcript, "...when you start talking about military applications or getting into personal light jets, that is, the small jets that people can afford to own and operate, or even into a bigger class of airplane, when you get up to a higher weight and more passengers, those are areas that we believe the product will work for future applications."

The Military Airplanes of Various Countries

National Air and Space Museum
Aircraft carrier in center, naval aircraft above, army aircraft below, different countries' planes depicted, text block below; orange background, yellow text blocks and multicolor aircraft in ink on paper with metal hangers at top and bottom. Relief Halftone/Letterpress.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Copyright Disclosure for Orphaned Works

Whenever possible, the museum provides factual information about copyright owners and related matters in its records and other texts related to the collections. For many of the images in this collection, some of which were created for or by corporate entities that no longer exist, the museum does not own any copyrights. Therefore, it generally does not grant or deny permission to copy, distribute or otherwise use material in this collection. If identified, permission and possible fees may be required from the copyright owner independently of the museum. It is the user's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other use restrictions when copying, distributing or otherwise using materials found in the museum's collections. Transmission or reproduction of protected materials beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Users must make their own assessments of rights in light of their intended use.

If you have any more information about an item you've seen in the Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection, or if you are a copyright owner and believe we have not properly attributed your work to you or have used it without permission, we want to hear from you. Please contact pisanod@si.edu with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

View more information about the Smithsonian's general copyright policies at http://www.si.edu/termsofuse

Airplane

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Paper Airplanes Flew Decades Before Real Ones Did

Smithsonian Magazine

Page 16 of Every Little Boy’s Book details the folding of a piece of paper such that "when thrown from the hand, rarely hits the object aimed at, as it generally makes a graceful curve in passing through the air." To modern eyes, the instructions, description and illustration are exactly those of a paper airplane. But Phil Edwards for Vox.com points out that these instructions were printed in 1864, 39 years before the Wright Brothers first flew their airplane

Humans dreamed of flight long before they put humans in the air. Back in the early 1500s, Leonardo da Vinci had designed a man-powered flying machine. Mathematician Archytas of Tarentum reportedly created a mechanical wooden dove that flew for 200 meters in 250 B.C.E. So paper airplanes flying from the hands of children during the Civil War Era aren’t that surprising — although the book calls them 'paper darts,' not airplanes.  But despite the name, the design is very familiar and so was the play, apparently. Edwards writes:

People even used paper darts the same way kids use paper airplanes today: to be annoying. An 1881 description of the New York Stock Exchange noted an unusual punishment: "to throw a paper dart or ball at a member during the session of the Board is to incur a fine of ten dollars." Naturally, people threw paper darts at teachers, too: an 1889 story recalls the many times "a paper dart has glided noiselessly down the room, amidst the suppressed applause and smothered hilarity of the students."

When the term "paper aeroplane" first appeared in the 1890s, the toys it referred to looked more like birds than the aircraft that eventually lifted off the ground. They even included ways to flap the wings. It wasn’t until the 1950s and 60s, when airplanes finally looked like the paper toys of the last century did "plane" fully replace "dart" in the toy’s name.

The lag of that change indicates just how fixated people were to the idea that flying machines would imitate birds. Then again,  humans have experimented with a lot of very odd-looking aircraft. Of course, now engineers and designers have truly dialed in the performance of real airplanes as well as the paper variety.

Airplane model

National Museum of the American Indian

Why the Military Is Investing in Paper Airplanes

Smithsonian Magazine

In the midst of disaster, small items like batteries or medical supplies can be a matter of life or death. But what is the safest and most cost-effective way to deliver those items? The U.S. military is investing resources into answering that question. Along they way, they've come up with an unexpected way to pull off dangerous, one-way resupply missions; it's a solution that involves, of all things, paper airplanes.

As IEEE Spectrum’s Evan Ackerman reports, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has a new program devoted to creating disposable—and perhaps paper—drones. The DARPA program is called ICARUS (short for Inbound, Controllable, Air-Releasable, Unrecoverable Systems), and it’s aimed at creating what the agency calls "vanishing air vehicles that can make precise deliveries of critical supplies and then vaporize into thin air.”

If paper airplanes don’t exactly seem to fit that bill, think again. Otherlab, a San Francisco-based group that specializes in using unusual materials to create unexpected machines, has received DARPA funding for a drone called APSARA (Aerial Platform Supporting Autonomous Resupply/Actions).

Behind this lengthy acronym is a concept that’s actually kind of ingenious. APSARA drones are mainly cardboard and packing tape with a few very simple hardware elements like a battery and GPS system. The tiny package of electronics helps steer the paper plane toward its target. Once they drop their payload (about 2.20 pounds for a 3.3-foot drone) they eventually disintegrate. Ackerman notes that DARPA is funding a separate program—with a separate acronym, of course—that will hopefully develop electronics that disappear or degrade just like the disposable drone.

The drones even have a tasty twist: they’ll eventually be made from mushrooms. As Tim Wright notes for Smithsonian’s Air & Space, the drones won’t be cardboard forever. Rather, Otherlab intends to eventually make them from mycelium—the mushroom's filamentous offshoots that acts a bit like roots. It’s a renewable resource, and one that Otherlab hopes will make the drone disappear even more rapidly once its work is done.

Paper airplanes? Mushroom messengers? It’s all part of a day’s work for DARPA, which already has plans for everything from fairy tale-inspired drone swarms to self-steering bullets. The projects may seem futuristic—even esoteric. But they’re all built with safety in mind. Whether or not cardboard or mushroom drones ever make it to the battlefield, the future of warfare is shaping up to be strange indeed.

Where Do the Largest Airplanes Go to Die?

Smithsonian Magazine

As a kid growing up in Arizona, there was a particular stretch of desert along Interstate 10 that I always looked forward to passing while on family road trips. I remember pressing my face up against the backseat passenger window in anticipation as our car crept north, staring out at the multicolored tail fins of 737s, 747s and other commercial airliners in the distance that stood in stark contrast against the surrounding monochromatic desert. I heard stories about how the aridness of the Sonoran Desert made Pinal Airpark in Marana, located 30 minutes north of Tucson, ideal for protecting commercial aircraft against corrosion. But beyond these fleeting drive-bys, its existence remained a mystery to me.

During a visit home earlier this month, I heard a rumor that Pinal Airpark had opened its gates to the public and was now offering tours. I knew I had to see this elusive place in person once and for all, so I contacted Jim Petty, the airport’s manager, to schedule a tour. Pinal Airpark is one of only a handful of such aircraft boneyards located around the world, with the majority found in the American Southwest.

It's sunny and seasonably warm the morning I pull my car up to one of the airport’s portable buildings where Petty greets me. With a footprint of approximately 1,500 acres, there's too much ground to cover on foot, so we hop into his SUV and head for the boneyard, passing the airport’s single 6,850-foot runway and an aircraft hangar before driving past a chain link fence with a sign that warns: “Restricted Area, No Trespassing.” As his vehicle bounces along the dirt road, Petty fills me in on some of the history of this airport, which was known as Marana Army Air Field when construction began in 1942. Upon completion, the U.S. military used the property for cadet training during the heart of World War II. After changing hands several times over the years—including a rumored stint during the Vietnam War as the CIA’s headquarters for air operations (Petty says he can’t confirm this, but has heard stories)—the airpark is currently owned and operated by Pinal County, which leases space on this solitary stretch of land to the aging aircrafts’ owners, typically banks.

During my visit, about 124 airliners currently rest on this swath of desert, some with their engines swaddled in mylar as protection until the owner can get them back into rotation—as is the case for one Korean Air jumbo jet we drive past, its pale blue paint job still shiny from the factory.

“Sometimes a deal will fall through, so we’ll store them here until things are worked out between the company and the buyer,” Petty tells me before pulling up to a grouping of six airliners, their paint bleached by the sun. I climb out of his SUV and head toward a 747-200 that was once part of the (now defunct) TWA fleet, its recognizable logo faded to a pale red. Nearby, a Northwest Airlines 747-200 cargo plane, its logo since painted over, also rests, a tangle of weeds creeping up its front tire.

Northwest Airlines 747-200 (Jennifer Nalewicki)

“Watch out for snakes,” Petty warns me as I move in for a closer look, craning my neck in an attempt to see the pilots’ windows as if looking up from the base of a skyscraper. Unlike the Korean Air jet, these are in various states of disrepair and are years removed from their last voyages in the sky. Petty explains that many of the airpark's planes have been scrapped of their engines, landing gear, seats and other valuable parts, which have since been sold. Many of the planes, including a grouping of Southwest and Delta jets in the distance, reside there, their parts being swapped out and used by each airline’s operating fleet. (Due to certain restrictions, I was only allowed to photograph and see specific aircraft up close after gaining permission from their owners, which Petty had coordinated for this article.)

If aircraft are past their prime, a team of mechanics will “pickle” them, filling their engines with enough oil to keep them lubricated until parts can be salvaged; other times, planes will be crushed, their aluminum alloy recycled and turned into goods from soda cans to circuit boards. One or two are even used for unconventional purposes, including a China Eastern McDonnell Douglas MD-82, which sits at a distance from the other planes that are parked in tidy rows. Local emergency services use this one for drills, Petty says.

“I know one owner of a 747 who is thinking about moving his plane elsewhere and turning it into a sushi restaurant,” Petty says, as we head back to his office, passing by what could possibly be the airpark’s most unique holdings: a grouping of Grumman Albatross from the 1940s.

As a pilot himself, Petty says that he has always had an appreciation for airplanes, starting from when he was a child watching his father serve in the U.S. Air Force. And although over time he has grown used to seeing these massive airliners that would otherwise never cross into Marana airspace roaring down the landing strip, he realizes how lucky he is to be doing such unique work—and is excited to finally get the opportunity to share it with the public.

“I’ve come to love and respect what these planes can do,” he says. 

To coordinate your own tour, email Jim Petty at Jim.Petty@pinalcountyaz.gov. 

Airplane Whirligig

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Airplane

Smithsonian American Art Museum
1-24 of 4,018 Resources