Skip to Content

Found 2,931 Resources

Nagayati: Arts and Architecture among the Gabra Nomads of Kenya

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
This video presents the arts and architecture of the Gabra nomads in northern Kenya, focusing on the roles of women as designers, builders, owners, and users. Available for a three-week loan at no charge.

Ndebele Architecture

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Ndebele Architecture, 1936-1949. Walls and steps are decorated with painted geometric designs. Photograph by Constance Stuart Larrabee, 1936-1949.

Between 1936 and 1949, Constance Stuart devoted much of her spare time to photograph the Ndebele, who lived in settlements near Pretoria. During the week, Stuart operated her studio in town; on weekends she drove to the nearby settlements. She frequently returned to the same places, and became familiar with many Ndebele women. Stuart created portraits, recorded Ndebele architecture, and documented activities, among them wall painting and mat making.

There are no prints of this negative in the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection. EEPA produced an 8x10 study print for reference purposes.

The cataloging of the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection was supported by a grant from The Smithsonian Women's Committee.

Ndebele Architecture

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Ndebele Architecture, 1936-1949. Walls and steps are decorated with painted geometric designs. Photograph by Constance Stuart Larrabee, 1936-1949.

Between 1936 and 1949, Constance Stuart devoted much of her spare time to photograph the Ndebele, who lived in settlements near Pretoria. During the week, Stuart operated her studio in town; on weekends she drove to the nearby settlements. She frequently returned to the same places, and became familiar with many Ndebele women. Stuart created portraits, recorded Ndebele architecture, and documented activities, among them wall painting and mat making.

There are no prints of this negative in the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection. EEPA produced an 8x10 study print for reference purposes.

The cataloging of the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection was supported by a grant from The Smithsonian Women's Committee.

Ndebele Architecture

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Ndebele Architecture, 1936-1949. Walls and steps are decorated with painted geometric designs. Photograph by Constance Stuart Larrabee, 1936-1949.

Between 1936 and 1949, Constance Stuart devoted much of her spare time to photograph the Ndebele, who lived in settlements near Pretoria. During the week, Stuart operated her studio in town; on weekends she drove to the nearby settlements. She frequently returned to the same places, and became familiar with many Ndebele women. Stuart created portraits, recorded Ndebele architecture, and documented activities, among them wall painting and mat making.

There is one 8x10 black and white fiber-based prin of this negative in the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection. There is a signature by the photographer at the bottom that reads: "Constance Stuart Larrabee, 1947." There is also a 19 1/2 x 19 cm. black and white vintage print. EEPA produced an 8x10 study print for reference purposes.

The cataloging of the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection was supported by a grant from The Smithsonian Women's Committee.

Ndebele Architecture, Pathway

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Ndebele Architecture, Pathway, 1936-1949. This is an opening leading to a pathway to a painted homestead. One of the walls of a homestead can be seen, painted with various geometric designs. The walls outside are painted with lines and squiggles going in different directions. Photograph by Constance Stuart Larrabee, 1936-1949.

Between 1936 and 1949, Constance Stuart devoted much of her spare time to photograph the Ndebele, who lived in settlements near Pretoria. During the week, Stuart operated her studio in town; on weekends she drove to the nearby settlements. She frequently returned to the same places, and became familiar with many Ndebele women. Stuart created portraits, recorded Ndebele architecture, and documented activities, among them wall painting and mat making.

There are no prints of this negative in the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection. EEPA produced an 8x10 study print for reference purposes.

The cataloging of the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection was supported by a grant from The Smithsonian Women's Committee.

The craft market, Ikot Ekpene town, Nigeria. [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.

Donated by Simon Ottenberg, 2000.

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "The craft market at Ikot Ekpene town in Ibibio country south of Afikpo and Unwana Village-Groups." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part II].

The craft market, Ikot Ekpene town, Nigeria. [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.

Donated by Simon Ottenberg, 2000.

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "The craft market at Ikot Ekpene town in Ibibio country south of Afikpo and Unwana Village-Groups." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part II].

Ndebele Woman Displaying Her Crafts

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Ndebele Woman Displaying Her Crafts, 1936-1949. On a stick are various items such as beaded necklaces and brooms on display. The woman and her child are seated behind the display near the entrance to a decorated home dwelling. Photograph by Constance Stuart Larrabee, 1936-1949.

Between 1936 and 1949, Constance Stuart devoted much of her spare time to photograph the Ndebele, who lived in settlements near Pretoria. During the week, Stuart operated her studio in town; on weekends she drove to the nearby settlements. She frequently returned to the same places, and became familiar with many Ndebele women. Stuart created portraits, recorded Ndebele architecture, and documented activities, among them wall painting and mat making.

There are no prints of this negative in the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection. EEPA produced an 8x10 study print for reference purposes.

The cataloging of the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection was supported by a grant from The Smithsonian Women's Committee.

Miscellaneous Craft Implements n.d. Drawing/Print

National Anthropological Archives
drawing print

Bronze Statuette Of Reclining Woman - "Sleeping Africa", by Herbert Ward

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
THIS ITEM USED TO BE ON EXHIBIT IN HALL 7 AT NHB.

"Sleeping Africa." Allegory for Africa at the dawn of European colonialism.

NAGAYATI Arts and Architecture among the Gabra Nomads of Kenya.

National Museum of African Art
NAGAYATI (“BE IN PEACE”) explores the arts and architecture of the Gabra Nomads in northern Kenya, East Africa. The film documents a Gabra marriage ceremony, in the course of which a new house and its furnishings are created. The Gabra possess an aesthetic unique to their own lifestyle and environment. It is aesthetic born of the strongest demands of transient life in an arid region, the paucity of available resources, and the importance of the ritual process of marriage. By integrating the art and technology of building and transport, women fulfill the roles of designers, builders, owners, and users.

Samburu [women] : Wamba, Kenya

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Professor Herbert Cole, Department of Art History, University of California at Santa Barbara.

Citation source: Professor Herbert Cole, Department of Art History, University of California at Santa Barbara.

Photograph by Herbert Cole of Samburu houses and women, Wamba, Kenya, 1973.

Earl's Canoe: A Traditional Ojibwe Craft

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Documentary preview illustrating the process of canoe-making within Native American traditional culture. Includes discussion of respect for nature in the Ojibwe Nation. Purchase required.

Portrait of Veiled Woman from North Africa in Costume n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Black and white photoprint on cardboard mount

Portrait of Woman from North Africa in Costume n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Black and white photoprint on standard card

Kuba woman decorating woven cloth, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

The photograph depicts Kuba woman at work on all-plush panel typical of contemporary work. She is brushing the raffia pile with the edge of the knife, which they also use to cut the pile stitches. "After the dyeing, the cloth is ready to be embroidered. Most Kuba embroidery combines on one cloth two types of decoration: stem-stitching and cut-pile or plush stitching. The equipment is simple: a needle and, for cut-pile or plush-work, a knife. The embroideress needs an enormous amount of steadiness and patience. Because of the time required, prosperous and royal men who have several wives or concubines gain an advantage in the production of decorated garments. Fine plush pieces are worked for months ad even years. the work is done intermittently, usually in the afternoons, after returning from working in the fields." [Adams Monni, 1978: Kuba Embroidered Cloth. African Arts, 12 (1), November 1978, pp.24-39]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.

Kuba women decorating woven cloth, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

The photograph depicts Kuba women at work on all-plush panel typical of contemporary work. They are brushing the raffia pile with the edge of the knife, which they also use to cut the pile stitches. "After the dyeing, the cloth is ready to be embroidered. Most Kuba embroidery combines on one cloth two types of decoration: stem-stitching and cut-pile or plush stitching. The equipment is simple: a needle and, for cut-pile or plush-work, a knife. The embroideress needs an enormous amount of steadiness and patience. Because of the time required, prosperous and royal men who have several wives or concubines gain an advantage in the production of decorated garments. Fine plush pieces are worked for months ad even years. the work is done intermittently, usually in the afternoons, after returning from working in the fields." [Adams Monni, 1978: Kuba Embroidered Cloth. African Arts, 12 (1), November 1978, pp.24-39]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.

Kuba women decorating woven cloth, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

The photograph depicts Kuba women at work on all-plush panel typical of contemporary work. They are brushing the raffia pile with the edge of the knife, which they also use to cut the pile stitches. "After the dyeing, the cloth is ready to be embroidered. Most Kuba embroidery combines on one cloth two types of decoration: stem-stitching and cut-pile or plush stitching. The equipment is simple: a needle and, for cut-pile or plush-work, a knife. The embroideress needs an enormous amount of steadiness and patience. Because of the time required, prosperous and royal men who have several wives or concubines gain an advantage in the production of decorated garments. Fine plush pieces are worked for months ad even years. the work is done intermittently, usually in the afternoons, after returning from working in the fields." [Adams Monni, 1978: Kuba Embroidered Cloth. African Arts, 12 (1), November 1978, pp.24-39]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.

Kuba women decorating woven cloth, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

The photograph depicts Kuba women at work on all-plush panel typical of contemporary work. They are brushing the raffia pile with the edge of the knife, which they also use to cut the pile stitches. "After the dyeing, the cloth is ready to be embroidered. Most Kuba embroidery combines on one cloth two types of decoration: stem-stitching and cut-pile or plush stitching. The equipment is simple: a needle and, for cut-pile or plush-work, a knife. The embroideress needs an enormous amount of steadiness and patience. Because of the time required, prosperous and royal men who have several wives or concubines gain an advantage in the production of decorated garments. Fine plush pieces are worked for months ad even years. the work is done intermittently, usually in the afternoons, after returning from working in the fields." [Adams Monni, 1978: Kuba Embroidered Cloth. African Arts, 12 (1), November 1978, pp.24-39]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.

Kuba women decorating woven cloth, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

The photograph depicts Kuba women at work on all-plush panel typical of contemporary work. They are brushing the raffia pile with the edge of the knife, which they also use to cut the pile stitches. "After the dyeing, the cloth is ready to be embroidered. Most Kuba embroidery combines on one cloth two types of decoration: stem-stitching and cut-pile or plush stitching. The equipment is simple: a needle and, for cut-pile or plush-work, a knife. The embroideress needs an enormous amount of steadiness and patience. Because of the time required, prosperous and royal men who have several wives or concubines gain an advantage in the production of decorated garments. Fine plush pieces are worked for months ad even years. the work is done intermittently, usually in the afternoons, after returning from working in the fields." [Adams Monni, 1978: Kuba Embroidered Cloth. African Arts, 12 (1), November 1978, pp.24-39]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.

Kuba woman decorating woven cloth, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

The photograph depicts Kuba woman at work on all-plush panel typical of contemporary work. She is brushing the raffia pile with the edge of the knife, which they also use to cut the pile stitches. "After the dyeing, the cloth is ready to be embroidered. Most Kuba embroidery combines on one cloth two types of decoration: stem-stitching and cut-pile or plush stitching. The equipment is simple: a needle and, for cut-pile or plush-work, a knife. The embroideress needs an enormous amount of steadiness and patience. Because of the time required, prosperous and royal men who have several wives or concubines gain an advantage in the production of decorated garments. Fine plush pieces are worked for months ad even years. the work is done intermittently, usually in the afternoons, after returning from working in the fields." [Adams Monni, 1978: Kuba Embroidered Cloth. African Arts, 12 (1), November 1978, pp.24-39]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.

Kuba women decorating woven cloth, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

The photograph depicts Kuba women at work on all-plush panel typical of contemporary work. They are brushing the raffia pile with the edge of the knife, which they also use to cut the pile stitches. "After the dyeing, the cloth is ready to be embroidered. Most Kuba embroidery combines on one cloth two types of decoration: stem-stitching and cut-pile or plush stitching. The equipment is simple: a needle and, for cut-pile or plush-work, a knife. The embroideress needs an enormous amount of steadiness and patience. Because of the time required, prosperous and royal men who have several wives or concubines gain an advantage in the production of decorated garments. Fine plush pieces are worked for months ad even years. the work is done intermittently, usually in the afternoons, after returning from working in the fields." [Adams Monni, 1978: Kuba Embroidered Cloth. African Arts, 12 (1), November 1978, pp.24-39]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.

Kuba women decorating woven cloth, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

The photograph depicts Kuba women at work on all-plush panel typical of contemporary work. They are brushing the raffia pile with the edge of the knife, which they also use to cut the pile stitches. "After the dyeing, the cloth is ready to be embroidered. Most Kuba embroidery combines on one cloth two types of decoration: stem-stitching and cut-pile or plush stitching. The equipment is simple: a needle and, for cut-pile or plush-work, a knife. The embroideress needs an enormous amount of steadiness and patience. Because of the time required, prosperous and royal men who have several wives or concubines gain an advantage in the production of decorated garments. Fine plush pieces are worked for months ad even years. the work is done intermittently, usually in the afternoons, after returning from working in the fields." [Adams Monni, 1978: Kuba Embroidered Cloth. African Arts, 12 (1), November 1978, pp.24-39]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.

Kuba women decorating woven cloth, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

The photograph depicts Kuba women at work on all-plush panel typical of contemporary work. They are brushing the raffia pile with the edge of the knife, which they also use to cut the pile stitches. "After the dyeing, the cloth is ready to be embroidered. Most Kuba embroidery combines on one cloth two types of decoration: stem-stitching and cut-pile or plush stitching. The equipment is simple: a needle and, for cut-pile or plush-work, a knife. The embroideress needs an enormous amount of steadiness and patience. Because of the time required, prosperous and royal men who have several wives or concubines gain an advantage in the production of decorated garments. Fine plush pieces are worked for months ad even years. the work is done intermittently, usually in the afternoons, after returning from working in the fields." [Adams Monni, 1978: Kuba Embroidered Cloth. African Arts, 12 (1), November 1978, pp.24-39]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
1-24 of 2,931 Resources