Skip to Content

Found 3,711,354 Resources

🔴Live at the Museum: Stepping Through Deep Time

Smithsonian Channel
Join host Kallie Moore from PBS Eons and paleontologist Adam Pritchard for an up-close look at unique fossils, including the Nation’s T-Rex, in the newly renovated David H. Koch Hall of Fossils at Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. When Whales Walked: Journeys in Deep Time (Premieres June 19 9PM ET) https://bit.ly/2QGEPTA #PBSEons

How Maps Shaped Shakespeare

Smithsonian Magazine

William Shakespeare knew his way around a map—just look at how King Lear divides his kingdom into three parts, creating chaos while he pursues his “darker purpose.” But what did the world look like when the Bard still walked the earth? An exhibition at the Boston Public Library celebrates the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death through historical maps. The play might be the thing for Shakespeare, but these maps, Linda Poon reports for CityLab, shed light on the playwright’s unique perspective and how he created drama for 16th-century theatergoers.

Shakespeare Here and Everywherewhich can be viewed at the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library through February 26, 2017, uses maps to show how Shakespeare thought of far-off worlds. Though he was based in England, the Bard often used foreign settings to create exotic stories—and thanks to the development of maps and atlases during his era, he was able to elevate what amounted to armchair traveling into fine art.

International travel was treacherous and expensive during Shakespeare’s day, so it’s not surprising that neither he nor many of his contemporaries ever left England. But in a time before TV or the internet, maps were a source not just of coveted information, but of entertainment. As the British Museum notes, to own or look at a map meant the viewer was literally worldly, and atlases and wall maps were used not as ways of navigating places most people would never encounter, but as symbols of education and adventure.

Can’t make it to Boston? Do some armchair traveling of your own: You can view the maps in the exhibition on the library’s website. Or explore the locales mentioned in Shakespeare’s plays with Shakespeare on the Map, a project that uses Google Maps to show how the playwright used location.

Editor's note, December 6, 2016: The piece has been updated to reflect that the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center is an independent organization located at the Boston Public Library.

Ask an Expert -- Pioneers of Flight: Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh and the "Tingmissartoq"

National Air and Space Museum
Dorothy Cochrane, curator in the Aeronautics Division of the National Air and Space Museum, discusses Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh and their exploratory flights in the "Tingmissartoq." This informal gallery talk was recorded on October 6, 2010 as part of the National Air and Space Museum's "Ask an Expert" lecture series "Ask an Expert" lectures are presented weekly at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC and biweekly at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA. For more information & schedule, see http://www.nasm.si.edu/askanexpert/

集古十種

Smithsonian Libraries
Title from daisen (title slip).

Compiled by Matsudaira Sadanobu. Cf. Kokusho sōmokuroku.

880-04 Imprint information from: Watanabe Shijuku Bunko shūzōhin mokuroku (http://www.i-berry.ne.jp/~nantray/bunko03.htm).

Probably 1899 reprint, using original woodblock, of the first published in 85 volumes, in1800. Cf. Nihon koten bungaku d.j.

On double leaves, in fukurotoji style.

熊猫实时视频花絮

Smithsonian Magazine

新美人合自筆鏡 : 吉原傾城 / [畫工北尾葏斎政演]

Smithsonian Libraries
Title from case.

Date from preface.

In gajōsō style.

Also available online.

Elecresource

新的独家照片

Smithsonian Magazine

扶桑畫人傳 / 古筆了仲編輯 ; 赤松德三, 佐藤榮中仝校

Smithsonian Libraries
On double leaves, in fukurotoji style.

冩眞花鳥圖會 : 二編

Smithsonian Libraries
Title from daisen (title slip) on cover.

Artist name from Kokusho sōmokuroku.

Reprint. Originally published in 1827.

Vols. 2 and 3 of 3-volume set.

Sequel to the previously published in 1805.

On double leaves, fukurotoji style.

Kokusho sōmokuroku. vol. 2. Lists the title as "Kachō shashin zue."

Also available online.

Elecresource

‪National Museum of Natural History Main Library grand opening, March 17, 2011‬ (r1)

Smithsonian Libraries
This is a video of the remarks made at the grand opening of the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History's new main library. Featured are Nancy E. Gwinn, Director, Smithsonian Institution Libraries, Wayne Clough, Secretary, Smithsonian Institution, and Cristián Samper, Director, National Museum of Natural History. The video was shot by SIL's Joel Richard (thanks, Joel!), titles and transitions added by Gil Taylor (SIL).

“… of course, it’s electric!”

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
WestinghouseAdvertBHAG“The Battle of the Centuries” was a dish washing contest between Mrs. Drudge and Mrs. Modern, between hand washing vs. electric dishwashers at the 1939/40 New York World’s Fair. This contest promoted all the benefits of modern appliances and is part of the history of new and improved technology in the modern age. The Cooper Hewitt Library...

“’Tis A Gift To Be Simple” But to Have a Splendid Garden Buy Shaker Seeds

Smithsonian Institution Libraries
In honor of Earth Day and National Garden Month, we take a look at one of the lesser known influences in the seed and garden business – the Shaker community.   The United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing, a religious sect commonly referred to as the Shakers, was founded in 18th-century England from more »

“Zamona” Sheet Music

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song "Zamona” was composed by William Loraine and published by Witmark and Sons of New York, New York in 1900. The song is an Arabian intermezzo, and is touted as being “immensely popular with Sousa’s band.” The cover is an illustration of a crescent moon and starry night sky above the silhouettes of pyramids, a sphinx, camels, and an oasis.

“Your Heart Rhymes With Mine” Sheet Music

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song "Your Heart Rhymes with Mine" was written by Irving Taylor and composed by Vic Mizzy. The music was published by the Famous Music Corporation of New York, New York in 1933. The cover features an illustration of a woman in a formal gown reclining at the base of a palm tree, with a full moon over the sea behind her. A man wearing a suit is lower, looking up at the woman, attempting to woo her.

“You're a Great Temptation (I Can't Resist)” Sheet Music

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “You're a Great Temptation (I Can't Resist).” George C. Pennington wrote the lyrics to the song and Billy James composed the music. The Globe Music Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania published this sheet music in 1915. The white cover features a colorful illustration of the face of a young brunette woman.

“You're One in a Million” Sheet Music

National Museum of American History
The sheet music for the song “You’re One In a Million” was written by Harry Harris and composed by Jimmy Durante. The sheet music was published by the Jimmy Durante Music Publishing Co., of Hollywood, California in 1947. The cover has an image of a piano’s keyboard and a violin, with an orange hue. The cover features an inset photo of Andy Russell on the lower left.

“You'll Never Miss Your Mother Till She's Gone” Sheet Music

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song “You’ll Never Miss Your Mother Till She’s Gone“ was written by Harry Birch, and published by White, Smith, and Company of Boston, Massachusetts in 1885. The cover features an image of a forlorn man reclining against a tombstone, with an image of his mother knitting in her chair above.

“You'll Be Sorry Just Too Late” Sheet Music

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song, “You’ll Be Sorry Just Too Late” was written and composed by Billy Gaston, and published by the Shapiro Company of New York, New York in 1907. The cover has a solid orange background with purple text and purple floral designs. The cover features an inset photo of Billy Gaston, and lists his other successful songs.

“You Remind Me of My Mother” Sheet Music

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “You Remind Me of My Mother” from the musical play “Little Nellie Kelly.” George M. Cohan wrote the lyrics and composed the music for the song. The sheet music was published by M. Witmark & Sons of New York City in 1922. In 1940 the play was turned into a film that starred Judy Garland.

“You Can't Be True, Dear” Sheet Music

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “You Can't Be True, Dear.” Gerhard Ebeler wrote the original lyrics and Hal Cotton wrote the English translation. Hans Otten and Ken Griffin composed the music. The music was published by the Biltmore Music Corporation of New York City in 1948. The brown cover features a triangular pattern with an inset photograph of singer Ken Griffin who would have performed and recorded the song.

“You Can Look and You Can Listen But M-U-M is the Word” Sheet Music

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song "You Can Look and You Can Listen But M-U-M Is The Word" was written and composed by Jason Brockman and J. Fred Helf. The music was published by Hitland Music Publishers of New York, New York in 1908. The cover has a solid yellow background, with an illustration of two men standing up, with the dandy giving the straight man a wink and a nudge not to tell the Missus about his times down at the dance café.

“W” Fare Token

National Museum of American History
The Scovill Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, Connecticut produced this transportation token during the early 20th century. The Scovill Company was established in 1802 as a button manufacturer and is still in business today. Scovill was an early industrial American innovator, adapting armory manufacturing processes to mass-produce a variety of consumer goods including buttons, daguerreotype mats, medals, coins, and transportation tokens. The center of the token has been removed to leave the shape of a “W.”

Obverse: The legend reads: GOOD FOR ONE FARE

Reverse: The legend reads: GOOD FOR ONE FARE

“Worried About You” Sheet Music

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song "Worried About You” was written by John Steel and composed by Mabel Stapleton. The music was published by the Burrhus Music Publishing Company in 1925. The cover notes that the song has been featured by Mr. John Steel, calling him “America’s Celebrated Tenor.” The cover has an illustration of a man in front of a fireplace, with the flame rising and turning into the face of the woman on his mind.
1-24 of 3,711,354 Resources