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Found 73 Collections

 

Triumph and Tragedy at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to support the 2019 National History Day theme, Triumph and Tragedy in History. Utilizing portraits and other resources from the National Portrait Gallery, this collection is organized by Topics within the Triumph and Tragedy theme. 

Be sure to check out the following at the end of the collection: 

-Reading Portraiture Guide for Educators highlights close looking strategies that can be used with the portraits listed

-Triumph and Tragedy In History Theme Book from National History Day 2019

#NHD2019

#NPGteach


Briana White
104
 

Selfies de antes y de ahora / Selfies Back Then... And Now

Selfies de antes y de ahora



Esta coleccion fue producida en colaboracion por Marcela Velikovsky y Whitfield Mastin de Bullis School, y Vicky Masson de Sheridan School, conjuntamente con el Learning to Look Teacher Institute 2016 de la National Portrait Gallery.



En este proyecto, los estudiantes primero usan estrategias de lectura de retratos, rutinas de pensamiento y rutinas de pensamiento global como guia para describir y analizar un autorretrato de Jose Gomez Sicre y Jose Clemente Orozco. Luego, los estudiantes aplican esas estrategias para crear su propio selfie y para observar, discutir e interpretar el de sus pares.



Esta coleccion incluye el plan de clase y las actividades de aprendizaje que los docentes pueden usar como guia. Tambien incluye ideas para utilizar en forma interdisciplinaria.



Para la version en ingles, visite la coleccion Selfies Back Then And Now



#NPGteach

Tags: Spanish; español; portrait; National Portrait Gallery; visual thinking; artful thinking; thinking routines; global thinking routines; Latin America Art; José Clemente Orozco; José Gómez Sicre; Spanish

Vicky Masson
2
 

Horn Players

This is introductory information for Jean-Michel Basquiat's "Horn Players" from 1983.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2017 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

TAGS: #NPGteach, portrait, learning to look, National Portrait Gallery, jazz, Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Basquiat, AP Art History

Emily Collins
12
 

iSpy: Storytelling in Presidential Portaiture

iSpy: Storytelling in Presidential Portraiture 

 

Objective: Students will explore how elements of a portrait tell the story of the subject’s identity by comparing portraits of Presidents Washington and Obama.

 

Procedure:

  1. Instruct students to look carefully at each portrait. They should read through the information for each portrait; follow the highlight instructions; and answer the quiz questions.
  2. Lead a discussion about the symbols included each portrait. What story is the artist trying to tell? What do they leave out? How does an artist contribute to our understanding of Washington and Obama’s identity? How does art help to shape our historical understanding of their subjects?
  3. Have students create a self-portrait and write an artist’s introduction explaining how they intentionally included/excluded/highlighted symbols to tell their story of identity. If making art isn’t possible, have students write a description of what their portrait would look like.

 

 

 

For more information and context:

http://www.georgewashington.si...

https://www.newyorker.com/cult...

 #NPGteach

Christy Ting
3
 

Unlikely Friendships II

Additional friendships to accompany the April 2018 workshop at the National Portrait Gallery #NPGteach

These are:

Frederick Douglas and Susan B. Anthony

Mary McLeod Bethune and Eleanor Roosevelt

Mary Todd Lincoln and her seamstress and confidante Elizabeth Keckley

Entertainers Marilyn Monroe and Ella Fitzgerald

Entertainers Marilyn Monroe and Eartha Kitt

Boxers Joe Louis and Max Schmeling

Jan Rubenstein
85
 

Selfies Back Then... and Now

Selfies Back Then... and Now - 

This collection was originally produced by Marcela Velikovsky and Whitfield Mastin from Bullis School, and Vicky Masson from Sheridan School, in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery’s 2016 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.
TAGS: #NPGteach, portrait, learning to look, National Portrait Galleryduring the Summer Institute "Learning to Look" at the National Portrait Gallery in 2016.

I have adapted this project to use with my English Classes. The students will complete a project in Google Slides in which they give instructions on how to take the best selfie, where to take the best selfie, and what information do selfies show the world about us.

Corina Madison
20
 

Man In The Mirror

This collection is dedicated in memory of the KING OF POP. It includes images throughout MJ's career and explores his many different looks.

#NPGteach

Reynaldo Quinn
16
 

Basquiat Programs for Libraries and Makerspaces

This is introductory information for Jean-Michel Basquiat's "Horn Players" from 1983.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2017 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

TAGS: #NPGteach, portrait, learning to look, National Portrait Gallery, jazz, Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Basquiat, AP Art History

Daniela Lyra
13
 

Cheaper by the Dozen "Jumping In"

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2016 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

In this activity students will use the "Jumping In" artful thinking strategy to foster understanding of sensory language. The students will be prompted to visualize themselves within the frame as a means to become more deeply engaged with the artwork. The objective is to be able to notice details, think creatively, and use descriptive language in written composition.

TAGS: #NPGteach, portrait, learning to look, National Portrait Gallery, Descriptive Language, Writing Prompts, Memory, Family,

Jessica Hicks
5
 

Amelia Earhart: America's Aviatrix

Students will use the elements of portrayal to analyze portraits of Amelia Earhart and listen to a speech to learn biographic details.

#NPGteach

Christy Ting
10
 

A STEAM Approach to Exploring Identity with Your Students

How is identity constructed? What role does biology play? 

This collection will highlight:

-how portraiture can be integrated into the science classroom by making connections between identity and genetics

-how we can explore identity from a broader perspective, utilizing global thinking routines

This collection is a collaboration between a Portrait Gallery educator and a high school IB Biology teacher, and was the topic of a professional development workshop at the museum and an NAEA session, both in March 2018. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
49
 

Unlikely friendships

"Culture is often difficult to define, but it influences everything from who you are as an individual to how you relate to other people at home and around the world. " from Cultural Conversations (2014)

Cultural conversations have been important to the development of the United States since its inception. To start cultural conversations among my students, I have gathered a collection of artifacts that give a brief history of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War. Douglass and Lincoln would ordinarily have not been friends,  but because of their relationship, history was changed forever! Other Friendships worth investigating: WEB DuBois and Woodrow Wilson (as well as William Monroe Trotter), Lyndon B Johnson and Martin Luther King, Jr., Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Banneker, and Eleanor Roosevelt and Mary McLeod Bethune.

#NPGteach


Jeryl Payne
25
 

The Valentine Dress

The Valentine Dress is the focus of a Visual Arts Lesson beginning with the Slow Look Strategy. This is followed with three ideas that may be incorporated into a high school fundamentals class. #npgteach

Vanessa Sales
11
 

Exploring Styles of Art

This lesson helps visitors (students and individuals) to the National Portrait Gallery better understand  the meaning of art and how it  is presented. Three primary ways of interpreting/showing art are explored - representational, abstract, and non-representational. This activity also allows (due to the three levels of complexity)  for people of different learning styles,  academic abilities, and artistic experience to learn at their own pace and comfort level. The ultimate goal is to help museum visitors become more confident and connected to the Gallery and its art. This lesson can be adapted for use  by teachers of all subjects and is best suited for grades 6-12 though it can easily be adjusted for lower elementary levels.  #NPGteach

Mark Collins
30
 

Making, Not Taking, Photographs: Jazz Photos by Herman Leonard

Making, Not Taking, Photographs

Herman Leonard is credited with making the iconic photographs of jazz musicians. He captured images of the most famous jazz musicians of the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s -- Sarah Vaughan, Charlie Parker, Nat King Cole, Buddy Rich, Billie Holiday -- you name them, he photographed them. His pictures look like candids. Leonard captured a moment during a performance. But looks can be deceiving. Leonard, who practiced his photography skills on his own time and with his own money, made the photos we think of as "jazz photos." Most of the time he used two lights, because that's all he could afford, and set up the photos, even though they look like snapshots. #NPGteach

Jan Rubenstein
37
 

Exploring American and Cultural Identity Through Portraiture

How do Americans identify as American?  In this collection we will lock at works by artists and ask how groups fof Americans from different Ethnic backgrounds perceive their American identity.  #NPGteach

Christopher Evans
12
 

Exploring Identity: How can portraiture conceal or reveal?

What is identity? How is it constructed? These activities investigate how portraits can conceal or reveal aspects of identity. How does the artist choose to portray an individual? How does the sitter choose to be shown?

This collection includes a three-part activity that can be modified by choosing to spend more or less time sharing out as a group. It begins with a discussion about identity, using the Chalk Talk Thinking Routine and a comparison of two portraits to further push students' thinking on how portraiture can both conceal and reveal aspects of identity. In the next parts of the activity, students are able to choose from a variety of portraits for individual reflection and then come together as a group to discuss a larger work to about culture and identity. Several Project Zero Thinking Routines can be used to stimulate and record thinking. 


Part I: Chalk Talk and comparing portraits

Students participate in the Chalk Talk Thinking Routine using the questions provided. A quick gallery walk where students circulate and read all responses can allow the class to get a feel for the many (or singular) perspective(s) of identity. Using the See-Think-Wonder Thinking Routine, students compare and contrast two portraits: LL Cool J by Kehinde Wiley and John D. Rockefeller by John Singer Sargent. Students can share with a neighbor and then out to the larger group or simply share out as a large group depending on class size, etc. 

 

Part II: Portraiture and Identity

Using the Individual Exploration of Portraiture worksheet, students can choose one image from the fifteen provided and spend some time exploring their selected portrait. Students can be given 5-10 minutes to interact with their chosen image. Using one of Roger Shimomura’s portraits, students will use the Unveiling Stories Thinking Routine to better understand the many layers to this work of art. Again, students can share out in pairs first or simply share out to the whole group depending on class size, etc.

 

Part III: Returning to chosen portrait and final reflection

Students will once again return to their selected portrait and complete the "second look" section of the Individual Exploration of Portraiture worksheet. A final reflection about identity and portraiture can be completed either as a group or individually using the I Used to think…; But Now I Think… Thinking Routine.

#NPGteach

Emily Veres
23
 

The Great Debate: Portraiture and Primary Sources

This collection is created in conjunction with a professional development workshop facilitated by the National Portrait Gallery and Teaching with Primary Sources Northern Virginia (TPSNVA is funded by a grant from the Library of Congress). 

Have you ever wondered if a portrait is a primary source? In this workshop, we will examine portraits from the Portrait Gallery, along with primary sources from the Library of Congress, to consider this question and explore connections between the two distinct collections. Participants will brainstorm and come up with strategies to incorporate these rich resources into their English and social studies curriculum.  

#NPGteach

Briana White
66
 

Exploring the National Portrait Gallery's Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute

The Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute takes a broad look at the Portrait Gallery's collection. During the institute, the museum's curators and historians provide in-gallery content lectures, introducing the collection. Utilizing an interactive approach, NPG educators model a variety of "learning to look" strategies—unique ways to hook and engage students when they look closely at portraits.

This collection represents portraits the museum has highlighted during past institutes. 

The Portrait Gallery hosts two week-long institutes each summer:

-the first, the last week in June

-the second, the week after 4th of July.  

To learn more and apply, visit http://npg.si.edu/teacher-work....

#NPGteach

Briana White
17
 

The Pride of a Pitcher: Pedro Martinez

How do we represent our roots artistically? What can a portrait tell us about the sense of identity of the subject? Focusing on a famous athlete from the Dominican Republic, students will explore the personal history of the pitcher, Pedro Martínez, and how his cultural pride is portrayed on canvas. Class members will read a recent biography of Martínez before examining his portrait, Pride and Determination, currently on exhibition in Twentieth-Century Americans: 1990 to Present. #NPGteach

Patrick Bonner
7
 

Express Yourself: Creating a Visual Journal with the Portrait Gallery

This collection was created in conjunction with a professional development workshop for teachers held at the National Portrait Gallery in 2017.

How can journaling transform the way your students experience museums and individual artworks? Sean Murphy, the art teacher at Samuel Tucker Elementary School in Alexandria, VA and the Portrait Gallery teamed up to introduce ways of incorporate journaling into your classroom. Participants explored the metacognitive benefits of using art journals in both the classroom and the museum. This workshop included both gallery and studio experiences. 

#NPGteach

Gayle Kraus
15
 

Express Yourself: Creating a Visual Journal with the Portrait Gallery

This collection was created in conjunction with a professional development workshop for teachers held at the National Portrait Gallery in 2017.

How can journaling transform the way your students experience museums and individual artworks? Sean Murphy, the art teacher at Samuel Tucker Elementary School in Alexandria, VA and the Portrait Gallery teamed up to introduce ways of incorporate journaling into your classroom. Participants explored the metacognitive benefits of using art journals in both the classroom and the museum. This workshop included both gallery and studio experiences. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
15
 

When East Meets West: The Story of Mehmed II

This is the story of Mehmed the Conqueror, perhaps the greatest of the Ottoman sultans. His victory over Constantinople on May 29, 1453 not only ended the Byzantine Empire, but forged the path for his predecessors to create one of the most expansive empires in the world. 


#NPGteach #npgteach #MehmedII #Ottoman Empire #sultan #EastMeetsWest #empire #history #Byzantines

Julia Guilfoyle
17
 

Rosa Parks: Compared to Herself

Created in conjunction with participating in the Learning to Look: Summer Teacher Institute [June 2017]

Rosa Parks

With a courageous act of civil disobedience, Rosa Parks sparked a challenge to segregation that culminated in one of the seminal victories of the modern civil rights movement. On December 1, 1955, while traveling on a public bus in Montgomery, Alabama, the seamstress was arrested for refusing the driver's demand that she surrender her seat to a white male passenger. When Parks was convicted of violating local segregation laws, Montgomery's African American community launched a massive one-day boycott of the city's bus system. The boycott expanded with the help of Martin Luther King Jr. to last 382 days, ending only after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled bus segregation unconstitutional.

How do various art forms effect the way that the viewer interprets different works of art? Some questions to consider are:

  • What are the events occurring in the portrait?
  • Do they make a personal connection?
  • What is the sitter saying in the portrait?
  • What questions does the portrait raise, for future discussions?


#npgteach #npg

Bryan Hill
5
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