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Found 95 Collections

 

Letters From Home: Chinese Exclusion and Family

The following digital exhibit highlights the personal experiences of Chinese immigrants in Seattle, WA during the early 20th century. The letter translations add the Wing Luke Museum's extensive archive of Chinese Exclusion era primary source letters into the canon of US history. This lesson is designed to capture the aesthetic, emotional and era-specific conventions in letter writing/correspondence,

The content includes historical references to further develop a student's understanding of Pull factors in immigration: the conditions driving populations to create new homes in new lands.

#APA2018 #TCSWingLuke


Rahul Gupta
19
 

"Shimomura Crossing the Delaware" by Roger Shimomura

This topical collection includes a painting, "Shimomura Crossing the Delaware," by Roger Shimomura, an American artist of Japanese descent, with a National Portrait Gallery "Portrait Spotlight" containing background information and suggested questions for the classroom. Also included are a blog post and video interview of the artist about themes of identity in his work. 

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions about Shimomura and his artworks and for further research.  Also included are Smithsonian Learning Lab collections with teaching strategies from National Portrait Gallery educator, Briana White

Keywords: Asian American, painter, Washington Crossing the Delaware, Claim, Support, Question, Compare and Contrast, Seattle 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

#APA2018

Ashley Naranjo
16
 

Letters From Camp

Letter From Camp, a video by Frank Chi featuring Muslim American youths and survivors of Japanese American Internment

#APA2018

Colleen Demboski
56
 

Resources List: Asian Americans in Cleveland

This collection includes resources presented at the November 16, 2018 Educator Workshop at the Cleveland History Center of the Western Reserve Historical Society.

#APA2018   

Mary Manning
70
 

Project Zero Thinking Routines

This introductory collection includes the Understanding Map and several of Harvard University’s Project Zero routines. Workshop participants will select a routine(s) based on the type of thinking and understanding they are trying to encourage. The routine(s) can be paired with museum resource(s) (visuals, audio, texts) that (1) align to a topic or theme that will be taught this semester and (2) provide engaging stimuli to prompt discussion. 

#PZPGH #LatinoHAC #APA2018

Ashley Naranjo
41
 

Analyzing an Oral History Interview: Grant Ichikawa

This collection includes an oral history interview with Grant Hayao Ichikawa (April 17, 1919- December 3, 2017). Ichikawa was a U. S. Army veteran who enlisted after he was relocated to a Japanese American incarceration camp with his family in 1942. The interview includes a first-hand account of the impact of the bombing of Pearl Harbor on Japanese Americans.

Complementary resources to the podcast audio file include: a National Museum of American History teachers' guide and images, Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting your own oral history, and additional video and audio oral histories with Grant Ichikawa from the Library of Congress American Folklife Center. 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: Congressional Gold Medal, veteran, internment camps, World War II, commission, wartime, close listening

#APA2018

Ashley Naranjo
23
 

Analyzing Oral History Interviews: Asian Indian Community of Cleveland, Ohio

This collection includes a series of oral history interviews the Asian Indian Community of Cleveland, Ohio from 2013. Ten Asian Indians who settled in the Greater Cleveland region during the 1950s and 1960s were interviewed by middle and high school students. These interviews document their unique immigrant experiences and focus on professional, family and religious life.

Complementary resources to the podcast files include: a National Museum of American History teachers' guide and images, Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, and a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting your own oral history.

Interviewees include: Ajeet Singh Sood, Batuk Modi, Dipti P. Roy, Elizabeth and Winfred Balraj,  Gulab Khandelwal,  Ivan Tewarson, Kul Bhushan, Om Julka, Paramjit Singh, P.K. and Virginia Saha,  Ramachandran Balasubramaniam, Ranajit Datta, Sam Rajiah, Shanta and Surinder Kampani, Shiv and Saroj Aggarwal, Vijay Rastogi, Vinay and Surinder Bhardwaj

#APA2018

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Ashley Naranjo
10
 

Mochi Barrel - Japanese Cultural Traditions in Cleveland

This collection begins with one object from the collections of the Cleveland History Center - a usu, or stamp mill, that is used to make mochi, a type of Japanese rice cake.  Building from that one object, this collection also explores the history of the family who owned and used this item, the cultural traditions associated with the mochi-making ceremony that the family maintained years after their arrival in the United States, and how the Japanese-American population in Cleveland grew considerably during and after World War II.  

#APA2018

Mary Manning
18
 

Japanese American Incarceration - Focus on the Assembly Centers

After the Civilian Exclusion Orders were issued for Japanese Americans, many families were temporarily held in detention centers that the government referred to as "assembly centers." There were 15 of these centers and they were often at fairgrounds or racetracks where buildings already existed. Families lived in horse stalls or other makeshift housing before being moved to one of the more permanent concentration camps. The average stay was for about 3 months. Through an examination of art and artifacts, this collection takes a closer look at the experience of Japanese Americans being forcibly removed from their homes and quickly moved to these temporary detention centers. #APA2018

Lynn Yamasaki
14
 

"Words can lie or clarify" by Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga

In 1981, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga submitted a memorandum on the subject “Use of term ‘concentration camps’” to the executive director of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC). Included in this collection is background information on the Japanese American Incarceration era and Executive Order 9066, alongside Herzig-Yoshinaga's own words. In response to reading through this memorandum, students can apply Project Zero Thinking Routines to what they already know about the Japanese American Incarceration era and what interests them for further research. Additionally, students can begin to connect ideas from Herzig-Yoshinaga's memorandum to artifacts, documents and photographs of the era, noting especially the nuances in the meaning of words used and interpret some of these euphemisms in context.

#APA2018

Related collection of interest around language found within the Civilian Exclusion Order: Document Analysis: Civilian Exclusion Order and Japanese American Incarceration During WWII

Ashley Naranjo
50
 

Who May Enter? Ellis Island and Angel Island Experiences

During this experience you will follow in the steps of immigrants whose immigration story took them to Angel Island and Ellis Island providing you a window into who came to the United States, why they came, the immigration process, their acceptance or denial as well as their legacy. You will find student instructions for each section on the arrow slide dividers. Click on each for instructions.  #APA2018

Throughout this experience consider the 3 Ys:

  1. Why might this snapshot of Angel Island & Ellis Island matter to me?
  2. Why might it matter to people around (family, friends, fellow students, community)
  3. What might it matter to the world?

---

Quotes / Poems to consider:

Angel Island Written on the walls in Chinese

I am distressed that we Chinese are
in this wooden building
It is actually racial barriers which cause
difficulties on Yingtai Island.
Even while they are tyrannical they still
claim to be humanitarian.
I should regret my taking the risks of
coming in the first place.

This is a message to those who live here not
to worry excessively.
Instead, you must cast your idle worries to
the flowing stream.
Experiencing a little ordeal is not hardship.
Napoleon was once a prisoner on an island.

Ellis Island

"Well, I came to America because I heard the streets were paved with gold. When I got here, I found out three things: first, the streets weren’t paved with gold; second, they weren’t paved at all; and third, I was expected to pave them." Italian Immigrant

"Island of Hope, Island of Tears"



Merri Weir
33
 

Learning to Look: Letter from Artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi, after the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

This collection includes student activities and learning to look questions, as well as additional teacher resources for extending the lesson. Students will use the primary sources to understand the changing perspectives and perceptions of Japanese Americans in the World War II era.

Keywords: Japanese Incarceration, George Biddle, Franklin D. Roosevelt, WW2, WWII, analysis, written response, essay, text, Max Yavno, Pearl Harbor, Works Progress Administration (WPA)

#APA2018

#historicalthinking


Ashley Naranjo
12
 

Document Analysis: Civilian Exclusion Order and Japanese American Incarceration During WWII

In this collection, students will carefully analyze and dissect a Civilian Exclusion Order for euphemistic language, misleading descriptions, and questionable instructions. This order was one of many posted by the United States government in 1942 in neighborhoods all along the West Coast to notify Japanese and Japanese American residents that they would be removed from their homes. The order also gave families instructions to follow.

Also included are resources further contextualizing the Civilian Exclusion Order including photographs, all three pages of Executive Order 9066, lesson plans created by the Japanese American National Museum, and blog posts written by Education staff at the Japanese American National Museum.

#APA2018

Sohayla Pagano
15
 

Resources List: Japanese American Experience

This collection includes resources presented at the October 20, 2018 Educator Workshop at the Japanese American National Museum. Included are resources from the Japanese American National Museum, other resources surrounding the Japanese American experience, and other useful APA resources.

#APA2018  

Sohayla Pagano
24
 

Documenting History: Photography and Japanese American Incarceration During WWII

In this collection, students will critically analyze photographs depicting the forced removal and incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII. Students will analyze two photographs: the first by photographer Clem Albers, who was one of several photographers commissioned by the War Relocation Authority to document the process of forced removal and incarceration; the second, a photograph by Mori Shimada, taken in 1942-1943 while Shimada and his family were forcibly incarcerated in Heart Mountain, Wyoming. 

Also included are resources further contextualizing the photographs including articles, lesson plans, a 1943 Office of War Information film, additional photographs from the War Relocation Authority, and other photographs taken by Japanese Americans while forcibly incarcerated during WWII.

#APA2018

Sohayla Pagano
33
 

Filipinos in America

This activity is a glimpse into Filipino / Filipino-Americans. Although they were first Asians to land in the Americas in 1587, under the control of the US for almost 100 years many in the United States aren't familiar with Filipinos / Filipino-Americans and their impact on the United States.

#APA2018

You will find student instructions for each section on the arrow slide dividers but also on many of the resources themselves (look for the 1 beside the paperclip when you open a resource). Click on each for instructions. 

Throughout this experience consider the 3 Ys:

1.    Why might this glimpse into the history and experiences of Filipinos/Filipino-Americans in the United States matter to me?

2.    Why might it matter to people around (family, friends, fellow students, community)

3.    What might it matter to the world?

Additionally how were the early depictions of Filipinos as savages uncivilized affected our collective ideas about Filipinos/Filipino-Americans today?

Merri Weir
27
 

Allies in the Fields

Most people are familiar with the Farm Workers Movement but many do not know the long history of resistance in the fields.  This activity will provide an introduction into the role Asians and Asian Americans played in providing food across the United States and the pivotal role they played gaining farm worker rights. #APA2018

You will find student instructions for each section on the arrow slide dividers. Click on each for instructions.   

Throughout this experience consider the 3 Ys:

  1. Why might this snapshot of the role of Asians and Asian Americans in the fields matter to me?
  2. Why might it matter to people around (family, friends, fellow students, community)
  3. What might it matter to the world?

At the end of this activity focus on what it means to be an ally and revisit your Universe of Obligation activity.

 

Merri Weir
23
 

Asian Pacific American Artists

This topical collection includes resources related to Asian Pacific American artists, including individuals who work in photography, sculpture, painting, installation art, video art, landscape design, furniture design, jewelry and architecture. This collection includes portraits of the artists, artwork, articles, videos with experts, and related Smithsonian Learning Lab collections. 

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions including biographies of Asian Pacific American artists, art analysis, and historical context. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study. 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

Keywords: Nam June Paik, Korean American, Roger Shimomura, Japanese American, Maya Lin, Vietnamese American, CYJO, Cindy Hwang, Isamu Noguchi, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Akio Takamori, George Nakashima, visual art

#APA2018

Tess Porter
124
 

Asian American Modernism

This collection is meant to build on two earlier collections, "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows"  and "Asian American Artists and World War II" and to introduce the viewer to artists of Asian ancestry in America using Chang, Johnson & Karlstrom's text, Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (2008), the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's exhibition catalog "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008),the vast resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab, Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and other resources.  This collection is part two of four that I have organized, chronologically, on Asian American Art.  The other three collections are "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows",  "Asian American Artists and World War II" and "Asian American Contemporary Art".  It is my hope that these collections will serve as entry points to understanding the many contributions of Asian American artists in the U.S. from 1850 until the present time.

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop cultural intelligence.

Other purposes of these collections are to explore tangible and intangible cultural heritage; as well as jumpstart brave conversations about race, identity and immigration in the U.S. with teachers, tutors of English Language Learners and others who are interested in becoming cultural leaders in our public schools.

As Gordon H. Chang and Mark Dean Johnson state in the introduction of the exhibition catalog, "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008):

"Forty years ago there were no Asian Americans.  There were Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos, and others of Asian ancestry in the United States, but no 'Asian Americans,' as that term was coined only in 1968.  This population was commonly seen as foreign, alien, not of America.  Their lives and experiences were not generally accepted as part of the fabric of the country, even though Asians had begun settling here steadily in the mid-nineteenth century.

Then, in the late 1960s, as part of the upsurge in the self-assertion of marginalized communities,  'Asian America' emerged to challenge the stigma of perpetual foreignness.  'Asian American' was a claim of belonging, of rootedness, of pride and identity, and of history and community; it was also a recognition of distinctive cultural achievement"  (Chang, Johnson, 2008).

#APA2018

Julie Sawyer
18
 

Asian American Artists and World War II

This collection is meant to build on "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows" and to introduce the viewer to artists of Asian ancestry in America using Chang, Johnson & Karlstrom's text, Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (2008), the vast resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab, Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and other resources.  This collection is part two of four that I have organized, chronologically, on Asian American Art.  The other three collections are "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows",  "Asian American Modernism" and "Asian American Contemporary Art".  It is my hope that these collections will serve as entry points to understanding the many contributions of Asian American artists in the U.S. from 1850 until the present time.

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop cultural intelligence.

Other purposes of these collections are to explore tangible and intangible cultural heritage; as well as jumpstart brave conversations about race, identity and immigration in the U.S. with teachers, tutors of English Language Learners and others who are interested in becoming cultural leaders in our public schools.

"In the years before the American entry into World War II, many Chinese American artists, moved by the death and destruction caused by the Japanese invasion of China in the 1930s, depicted Japanese military atrocities in their artwork.  Yun Gee, Kem Lee, Nanying Stella Wong, and David P. Chun, among others, created anguishing images of Chinese suffering and Japanese military brutality.  These powerful images, though, had limited impact on the greater American public, whose attention was elsewhere.  Japanese American artists such as Hideo Date, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, and Isamu Noguchi also used their talents to condemn European and Japanese fascism and encourage American support for the Chinese victims of Japanese aggression.  But it was the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 that established the indelible connection between art, race, and war for these and other Asian American artists."  (Chang, Johnson, Karlstrom, 2008).  

  #APA2018

Julie Sawyer
30
 

Asian American Art: "Emerging from the Shadows"

This collection is meant to build on "Socially Constructed Learning through Art" and to introduce the viewer to artists of Asian ancestry in America using Chang, Johnson & Karlstrom's text, Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (2008), the vast resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab, Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and other resources.  This collection is part one of four that I have organized, chronologically, on Asian American Art.  The other three collections are "Asian American Artists and World War II",  "Asian American Modernism" and "Asian American Contemporary Art".  It is my hope that these collections will serve as entry points to understanding the many contributions of Asian American artists in the U.S. from 1850 until the present time.

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop cultural intelligence.

Other purposes of these collections are to explore tangible and intangible cultural heritage; as well as jumpstart brave conversations about race, identity and immigration in the U.S. with teachers, tutors of English Language Learners and others who are interested in becoming cultural leaders in our public schools.

In Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (Chang, Johnson, Karlstrom, 2008), Gordon H. Chang writes about Asian American art "emerging from the shadows".  He asks, "Why has this treasure been outside our vision?"  Historically, those of Asian heritage faced discrimination in the United States.  For instance, the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 prevented Asian immigrants from entering the country.  In 1945, the U.S. government forced Japanese Americans to move to remote internment camps.  Most of these people of Japanese ancestry were U.S. citizens or legal residents and they were forced to abandon their homes and businesses until the war ended.  In 1965, the U.S. finally lifted the last of the immigration laws that overtly discriminated against Asians.  

Asian Americans are now the fastest-growing racial group in the U.S., outpacing both Latinos and African Americans.  In 2013, there were more than 17.3 million Asian Americans living in the U.S. -- 6% of the population.  

So although Asian Americans have been making and exhibiting art in the U.S. since 1850, why is it still so difficult to define the style or content of Asian American art?  We will come back to this question in each of the four collections.

For early Asian American art, as Chang states in his forward, "The fascination with modern abstraction and nonrepresentational art, especially after World War II, turned public eyes away from art that appeared to have social messages or overt ethnic connections.  Art produced by Asian Americans, other racial minorities, and women in America that displayed such markers now appeared nonmodern and was eclipsed by the interest in abstraction.  Art that reflected the quandary of exile (such as that suffered by Chinese diasporic artists -- Wang Ya-chen, Chang Shu-chi, and Chang Dai-chien, for example -- in the mid twentieth century), displacement (such as that experienced by artists who worked in the United States during the height of racial antagonism, such as Yun Gee or Chiura Obata), and persecution (the Japanese artists who suffered internment, Eitaro Ishigaki and others, hounded because of their political beliefs) fell out of fashion." 

#APA2018

Julie Sawyer
24
 

Classroom Activity Using Images of Immigration and Identity from the National Portrait Gallery, the New York Times, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Students can use the "What makes you say that?" and the "3 Ys" thinking routines to explore two modern portraits about identity and immigration from the National Portrait Gallery. The first thinking strategy asks students to look at a work of art for several minutes before answering two questions: "What's going on?" and "What do you see that makes you say that?" (See https://learninglab.si.edu/res... for more information.)

To further and deepen the discussion, I've included a link to a September 2016 New York Times Op-Doc entitled "4.1 Miles," about a coast guard captain on a small Greek island who is suddenly charged with saving thousands of refugees from drowning at sea. (If it doesn't show up easily, you can view the original video on Times Video at https://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000004674545/41-miles.html.) I've also included two sculptures from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and an interview with Lisa Sasaki, head of the Smithsonian's Asian Pacific American Center.

You may wish to use the "3 Y's" thinking routine here as well, which asks students to consider the following questions:

1. Why might this [topic, question] matter to me?

2. Why might it matter to people around me [family, friends, city, nation]?

3. Why might it matter to the world?

(See https://learninglab.si.edu/res... for more information.)

#APA2018, #LatinoHAC


Philippa Rappoport
12
 

Flashcard Activity: Asian Pacific American Resources

This collection contains a diverse set of resources related to Asian Pacific Americans that may be used as an introductory activity to spark classroom discussion and prompt students to conduct research about how Asian Pacific American history is American history.  For discussion questions and activity implementation ideas, click "Read More."  A file to print these resources as flashcards is located at the end of the collection; please see the resource's Information (i) tab for printing instructions.

This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for further research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: printable, flash card, think puzzle explore, project zero visible thinking routine, apa

#APA2018

Tess Porter
48
 

Burmese Americans in Lowell, MA.

This collection highlights particular aspects - food, culture, religion, traditions - of the Burmese community in Lowell, MA.  The collection also features Burmese events and holidays that take place in the city.

#TCSLowell

 #APA2018

Tsongas Industrial History Center
11
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