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Found 99 Collections

 

Project Zero Thinking Routines

This introductory collection includes the Understanding Map and several of Harvard University’s Project Zero routines. Workshop participants will select a routine(s) based on the type of thinking and understanding they are trying to encourage. The routine(s) can be paired with museum resource(s) (visuals, audio, texts) that (1) align to a topic or theme that will be taught this semester and (2) provide engaging stimuli to prompt discussion. 

#PZPGH #LatinoHAC #APA2018 #TWUtech #WISSIT #EthnicStudies #Docenttips

Cindy Perreira
48
 

Project Zero Thinking Routines

This introductory collection includes the Understanding Map and several of Harvard University’s Project Zero routines. Workshop participants will select a routine(s) based on the type of thinking and understanding they are trying to encourage. The routine(s) can be paired with museum resource(s) (visuals, audio, texts) that (1) align to a topic or theme that will be taught this semester and (2) provide engaging stimuli to prompt discussion. 

#PZPGH #LatinoHAC #APA2018 #TWUtech #WISSIT #EthnicStudies

Ashley Naranjo
48
 

National History Day: Chinese Exclusion Act

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including digital exhibitions, photographs, documents, and lesson plans - help explore the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882), a United States Federal Law restricting immigration of all Chinese laborers and the first law implemented to prevent a specific ethnic group from immigrating to the United States.  Resources highlight the lives of Chinese-American families and racism in American advertisements from the Act's enactment to its repeal in 1943. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait and object resources. The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: prejudice, discrimination; immigration; china; asia; asian; chinese-american; asian-american; 19th century; 1800s; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; apa; asian pacific american; nhd; #NHD2018; #NHD; #APA2018

EDSITEment
47
 

Analysis of an Artwork by Maya Lin

Chinese American designer and artist Maya Lin (b. 1959) achieved national recognition as a Yale University undergraduate student when her design for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial won a national competition. 

In this activity, students will analyze a unique artwork-filled room designed by Maya Lin, first using only a still visual with little context, then a hyperlapse video of the artwork's installation,  then the artist herself discussing  her process, materials used, and vision. Students will make predictions based on visuals, gradually learn about the context of the artwork, and reflect on how their perception of the artwork changed with the addition of new information. 

This activity can be used as an entry point into studying Maya Lin's artwork and other artworks inspired by experiences with the natural environment. This activity opens with a Project Zero See-Think-Wonder routine and asks learners to look closely, prior to revealing additional contextual information. To learn more about other Asian Pacific American Artists, visit this collection: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/asian-pacific-american-artists/bW68eE1p6kHVzsC7#r

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: Chesapeake Bay, Maya Lin, Asian American, marbles, Renwick Gallery, waterways

#APA2018 #BecauseOfHerStory

Ashley Naranjo
13
 

Understanding Intersectionality

This topical collection includes videos and articles to support teachers in learning and teaching about the concept of intersectionality and being more mindful of intersectionality in their own teaching.  As defined by Teaching Tolerance,  Intersectionality refers to the social, economic and political ways in which identity-based systems of oppression and privilege connect, overlap, and influence one another. 

This collection begins with a video from the National Museum of African American History and Culture that serves as a  primer on the subject and also includes a TED Talk by Kimberlé Crenshaw, Washington Post articles on the subject, a Teaching Tolerance magazine article, and Crenshaw's 1989 research article, "Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics." Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions.

#APA2018 #EthnicStudies

Ashley Naranjo
7
 

"Shimomura Crossing the Delaware" by Roger Shimomura

This topical collection includes a painting, "Shimomura Crossing the Delaware," by Roger Shimomura, an American artist of Japanese descent, with a National Portrait Gallery "Portrait Spotlight" containing background information and suggested questions for the classroom. Also included are a blog post and video interview of the artist about themes of identity in his work. 

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions about Shimomura and his artworks and for further research.  Also included are Smithsonian Learning Lab collections with teaching strategies from National Portrait Gallery educator, Briana White

Keywords: Asian American, painter, Washington Crossing the Delaware, Claim, Support, Question, Compare and Contrast, Seattle 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

#APA2018 #EthnicStudies

Ashley Naranjo
17
 

Classroom Activity Using Images of Immigration and Identity from the National Portrait Gallery, the New York Times, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Students can use the "What makes you say that?" and the "3 Ys" thinking routines to explore two modern portraits about identity and immigration from the National Portrait Gallery. The first thinking strategy asks students to look at a work of art for several minutes before answering two questions: "What's going on?" and "What do you see that makes you say that?" (See https://learninglab.si.edu/res... for more information.)

To further and deepen the discussion, I've included a link to a September 2016 New York Times Op-Doc entitled "4.1 Miles," about a coast guard captain on a small Greek island who is suddenly charged with saving thousands of refugees from drowning at sea. (If it doesn't show up easily, you can view the original video on Times Video at https://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000004674545/41-miles.html.) I've also included two sculptures from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an interview with Lisa Sasaki, head of the Smithsonian's Asian Pacific American Center, and resources from the University of Minnesota  Libraries Publishing's Immigration Syllabus - Americans / Immigrants, Weeks 1-4.

You may wish to use the "3 Y's" thinking routine here as well, which asks students to consider the following questions:

1. Why might this [topic, question] matter to me?

2. Why might it matter to people around me [family, friends, city, nation]?

3. Why might it matter to the world?

(See https://learninglab.si.edu/res... for more information.)

#APA2018, #LatinoHAC, #EthnicStudies 

This collection supports Unit 1: Precious Knowledge - Exploring notions of identity and community, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Philippa Rappoport
14
 

Analyzing Oral History Interviews: Asian Indian Community of Cleveland, Ohio

This collection includes a series of oral history interviews the Asian Indian Community of Cleveland, Ohio from 2013. Ten Asian Indians who settled in the Greater Cleveland region during the 1950s and 1960s were interviewed by middle and high school students. These interviews document their unique immigrant experiences and focus on professional, family and religious life.

Complementary resources to the podcast files include: a National Museum of American History teachers' guide and images, Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, and a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting your own oral history.

Interviewees include: Ajeet Singh Sood, Batuk Modi, Dipti P. Roy, Elizabeth and Winfred Balraj,  Gulab Khandelwal,  Ivan Tewarson, Kul Bhushan, Om Julka, Paramjit Singh, P.K. and Virginia Saha,  Ramachandran Balasubramaniam, Ranajit Datta, Sam Rajiah, Shanta and Surinder Kampani, Shiv and Saroj Aggarwal, Vijay Rastogi, Vinay and Surinder Bhardwaj

#APA2018 #EthnicStudies

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Ashley Naranjo
10
 

Analyzing an Oral History Interview: Grant Ichikawa

This collection includes an oral history interview with Grant Hayao Ichikawa (April 17, 1919- December 3, 2017). Ichikawa was a U. S. Army veteran who enlisted after he was relocated to a Japanese American incarceration camp with his family in 1942. The interview includes a first-hand account of the impact of the bombing of Pearl Harbor on Japanese Americans.

Complementary resources to the podcast audio file include: a National Museum of American History teachers' guide and images, Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting your own oral history, and additional video and audio oral histories with Grant Ichikawa from the Library of Congress American Folklife Center. 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: Congressional Gold Medal, veteran, internment camps, World War II, commission, wartime, close listening

#APA2018 #EthnicStudies *This collection was created to support Unit 2: Culture and Resistance, oral history project assignment of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

Ashley Naranjo
23
 

Asian Pacific Americans in the Performing Arts

This topical collection includes resources about Asian Pacific American actors, choreographers, spoken word poets, musicians, composers, comedians, filmmakers, and stage performers. The collection includes portraits, videos and articles. 

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions about Asian Pacific American representation in the performing arts. This collection is not comprehensive, but rather provides a launching point for research and study. 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

Keywords: entertainment, actress, magician, dancer, “Siamese twins”, entrepreneur, Moana, Mulan, Anna May Wong, Chinese American, George Takei, Japanese American, Michio Ito, Dana Tai Soon Burgess, Korean American, Regie Cabico, Filipino American, Yo Yo Ma, Aziz Anzari, Mindy Kaling, Indian American, Bruce Lee

#APA2018

Ashley Naranjo
60
 

Immigration Policies and Legislation Affecting Asian Pacific Americans

This topical collection includes resources about immigration policies and legislation that affected, or specifically targeted, immigrants and those with ancestry from Asia and the Pacific Islands.  The policies and legislation profiled in this collection are not the only ones that did so by any means, however, they are some of the most significant.  Collection includes newspapers, objects, portraits, articles, and more.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions, such as those about immigration policy and/or discrimination. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: chinese exclusion act, 1882, wong chin foo, immigration act of 1917, literacy act, asiatic barred zone act, angel island, japanese incarceration, japanese internment, executive order 9088, 1942, world war ii, world war 2, immigration and nationality act of 1965, hart-celler act, immigration act of 1990, h-1b visa

#APA2018 #EthnicStudies


Tess Porter
52
 

Portrait Analysis: Norman Mineta

In this activity, students will analyze a portrait of Norman Mineta (b. 1931), a U.S. politician and the first Asian American to hold a post in the presidential cabinet, serving as Secretary of Transportation and Secretary of Commerce under President George W. Bush. The son of Japanese immigrants, Mineta and his family were incarcerated in the Heart Mountain camp in Wyoming under Executive Order 9066 during World War II.

This activity can be used to build students vocabulary in discussing visual elements of a portrait or as an entry point for studying Norman Mineta's life and achievements, U.S. history, and more.  Questions from the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators and a Project Zero See-Think-Wonder routine guide the student inquiry.  The complete guide and instructions are located at the end of the collection. To learn more about other Asian Pacific American activists and leaders, visit this collection: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/asian-pacific-american-activists-and-leaders/MR1jszd7YDA7gujx#r

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords:  internment; Japanese American; Nisei; San Jose, California

#APA2018 #EthnicStudies

Ashley Naranjo
10
 

Asian Pacific American Activists and Leaders

This topical collection includes resources about Asian Pacific American activists and leaders of important political, social, and labor movements. The collection includes portraits, short biographies, videos, and blog posts.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions about activism. This collection is not comprehensive, but rather provides a launching point for research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: Yuri Kochiyama, Grace Lee Boggs, Mitsuye Endo, Ram Bagai, Larry Itliong, Norman Mineta, Fred Korematsu, Daniel Ken Inouye, Minoru Yasui, Regie Cabico, Wong Chin Foo, Chew-Een Lee, Noriko Sawada Bridges Flynn, Richard Aoki, South Asian Lesbian and Gay Association (SALGA), Wong Ar Chong, workers' rights, human rights, Civil Rights Movement, Japanese Incarceration, Japanese Internment, politician, lawyer, spoken word poet, immigration, LGBT, Japanese American, Chinese American, Indian American, Filipino American

  #APA2018 #EthnicStudies

Ashley Naranjo
64
 

Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans and World War II

On February 19, 1942, Executive Order 9066 (#EO9066) was signed by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, resulting in the imprisonment of Japanese Americans & Japanese nationals in prison camps across the United States. In this short film, "Righting a Wrong", students can learn more about this history as they hear from a museum expert, who provides a behind-the-scenes look at personal objects from Japanese American youth who had lived in incarceration camps during World War II.  

The artifacts include a boy scout uniform that honors the 100th infantry battalion of Nisei soldiers, a thousand-stitch sash created by community members that served as an amulet for a soldier at war, and traditional Japanese geta sandals created for a son by his father that feature Mickey Mouse.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

#APA2018


Ashley Naranjo
9
 

Storytelling through Dance

This collection explores the unique forms of storytelling found in choreography and portraiture. It demonstrates examples of artists that communicate universal narratives and express diverse perspectives without words. Photographs of war veterans by Louie Palu and the veterans’ experiences of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) inspired the featured dance. Students can watch a video interview with the choreographer, Dana Tai Soon Burgess, and answer guided questions from Project Zero's "Claim, Support, Question" thinking routine.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

#APA2018

Tags: dance, dancing, choreography, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), narrative, interpretation, analysis

Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Cambodian New Year

Cambodian New Year (Khmer: បុណ្យចូលឆ្នាំថ្មី) or Choul Chnam Thmey in the Khmer language, literally "Enter New Year", is the name of the Cambodian holiday that celebrates the traditional Lunar New Year. The holiday lasts for three days beginning on NewYear's Day, which usually falls on April 13th or 14th, which is the end of the harvesting season, when farmers enjoy the fruits of their labor before the rainy season begins.

Cambodians also use Buddhist Era to count the year based on the Buddhist calendar.
    Maha Sangkran, derived from Sanskrit Maha Sangkranta, is the name of the first day of the new year celebration. It is the end of the year and the beginning of a new one. People dress up and light candles and burn incense sticks at shrines, where the members of each family pay homage to offer thanks for the Buddha's teachings by bowing, kneeling and prostrating themselves three times before his image. For good luck, people wash their face with holy water in the morning, their chests at noon, and their feet in the evening before they go to bed.

    Vireak Vanabat is the name of the second day of the new year celebration. People contribute charity to the less fortunate by helping the poor, servants, homeless, and low-income families. Families attend a dedication ceremony to their ancestors at monasteries.

    T'ngai Loeng Sak in Khmer is the name of the third day of the new year celebration. Buddhists wash the Buddha statues and their elders with perfumed water. Bathing the Buddha images is a symbolic practice to wash bad actions away like water clean dirt from household items. It is also thought to be a kind deed that will bring longevity, good luck, happiness and prosperity in life. By washing their grandparents and parents, the children can obtain from them best wishes and good pieces of advice to live the life for the rest of the year.

#APA2018  #TCSLowell

Lindsay Clark
29
 

Uncovering the Secrets of Queen Kapi’olani’s Canoe

This collection explores the cultural and historical significance of two diplomatic missions by Hawaiian King Kalākaua and Queen Kapi'olani to the United States. These 19th-century diplomatic missions established the first state dinner hosted by U.S. President Grant and included the gifting of a canoe from Queen Kapi'olani to the Smithsonian. Students can watch a video interview about this history and answer guided questions, then look closely  and analyze portraits of the monarchs, read more about the history of U.S. state dinners, and learn about the contemporary collaborations curators have with community members to reveal the history of objects, as described in the film. 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

#APA2018

Tags: Hawaii, Kapiolani, Kalakaua, outrigger canoe, wa'a, diplomacy

Ashley Naranjo
16
 

Portrait Analysis: Lili'oukalani

In this activity, students will analyze a portrait of Lili'oukalani (1838-1917), the last monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaii.  Queen Lili'uokalani came to the throne after her brother's death in 1891 and ruled until 1893 when, to avoid bloodshed, she surrendered to a coup led by American business leaders.  Opportunities to learn more include other portraits of Lili'uokalani, including one taken when she was 15, an article about her life and the annexation of Hawaii, and more.

This activity can be used as an entry point into studying Lili'uokalani's life and achievements, Hawaiian annexation, Hawaiian history and culture, and more.  This activity opens with questions from the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators and ends with a Project Zero Think / Puzzle / Explore routine; the full portraiture guide and routine instructions are located at the end of the collection.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: liliuokalani, hawai'i, polynesian, pacific islander

#APA2018 #BecauseOfHerStory

Tess Porter
11
 

Letters From Home: Chinese Exclusion and Family

The following digital exhibit highlights the personal experiences of Chinese immigrants in Seattle, WA during the early 20th century. The letter translations add the Wing Luke Museum's extensive archive of Chinese Exclusion era primary source letters into the canon of US history. This lesson is designed to capture the aesthetic, emotional and era-specific conventions in letter writing/correspondence,

The content includes historical references to further develop a student's understanding of Pull factors in immigration: the conditions driving populations to create new homes in new lands.

#APA2018 #TCSWingLuke


Rahul Gupta
19
 

Letters From Camp

Letter From Camp, a video by Frank Chi featuring Muslim American youths and survivors of Japanese American Internment

#APA2018

Colleen Demboski
56
 

Resources List: Asian Americans in Cleveland

This collection includes resources presented at the November 16, 2018 Educator Workshop at the Cleveland History Center of the Western Reserve Historical Society.

#APA2018   

Mary Manning
70
 

Mochi Barrel - Japanese Cultural Traditions in Cleveland

This collection begins with one object from the collections of the Cleveland History Center - a usu, or stamp mill, that is used to make mochi, a type of Japanese rice cake.  Building from that one object, this collection also explores the history of the family who owned and used this item, the cultural traditions associated with the mochi-making ceremony that the family maintained years after their arrival in the United States, and how the Japanese-American population in Cleveland grew considerably during and after World War II.  

#APA2018

Mary Manning
18
 

Japanese American Incarceration - Focus on the Assembly Centers

After the Civilian Exclusion Orders were issued for Japanese Americans, many families were temporarily held in detention centers that the government referred to as "assembly centers." There were 15 of these centers and they were often at fairgrounds or racetracks where buildings already existed. Families lived in horse stalls or other makeshift housing before being moved to one of the more permanent concentration camps. The average stay was for about 3 months. Through an examination of art and artifacts, this collection takes a closer look at the experience of Japanese Americans being forcibly removed from their homes and quickly moved to these temporary detention centers. #APA2018

Lynn Yamasaki
14
 

"Words can lie or clarify" by Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga

In 1981, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga submitted a memorandum on the subject “Use of term ‘concentration camps’” to the executive director of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC). Included in this collection is background information on the Japanese American Incarceration era and Executive Order 9066, alongside Herzig-Yoshinaga's own words. In response to reading through this memorandum, students can apply Project Zero Thinking Routines to what they already know about the Japanese American Incarceration era and what interests them for further research. Additionally, students can begin to connect ideas from Herzig-Yoshinaga's memorandum to artifacts, documents and photographs of the era, noting especially the nuances in the meaning of words used and interpret some of these euphemisms in context.

#APA2018

Related collection of interest around language found within the Civilian Exclusion Order: Document Analysis: Civilian Exclusion Order and Japanese American Incarceration During WWII

Ashley Naranjo
50
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