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A Brush with History

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Website presenting portraits and biographies from the 1720s to the early 1990s, organized by time period, of men and women who have made significant contributions to the history of the United States. Includes an interactive quiz and teacher resources.

60-30-10

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson in which students investigate how designers use percentages by designing and decorating a room using three different color ratios.

3D Collection

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
3D image collection of fossils, artifacts, primates, and other animals. Allows for close examination of objects from the David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins.

3-2-1 Bridge: Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
A Project Zero "Visible Thinking" routine for activating prior knowledge and making connections. This routine asks students to uncover their initial thoughts, ideas, questions, and understandings about a topic and then to connect these to new thinking about the topic after they have received some instruction. The framework asks students to write down 3 thoughts/ideas, 2 questions, and 1 analogy both before and after learning about a topic; then, the framework asks students to explain: “How do your new responses connect to your initial responses?”

3-2-1 BRIDGE

A routine for activating prior knowledge and making connections

Write an initial 3-2-1 set of responses to the topic, then, after studying the topic further, write a new 3-2-1 set of responses:

3 Thoughts/Ideas

2 Questions

1 Analogy

Bridge: Explain how your new responses connect to your initial responses.

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

This routine asks students to uncover their initial thoughts, ideas, questions, and understandings about a topic and then to connect these to new thinking about the topic after they have received some instruction.

Application: When and where can it be used?

Use this routine when students are developing understanding of a concept over time. It may be a concept that they know a lot about in one context but instruction will soon focus in a new direction, or it may be a concept about which students have only informal knowledge. Whenever new information is gained, bridges can be built between new ideas and prior understanding. Focus is on understanding and connecting one’s thinking, rather than pushing it toward a specific outcome.

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using this routine?

Have students do an initial 3, 2, 1 individually on paper; for instance, if the topic is “democracy,” then students would write down 3 thoughts, 2 questions, and 1 analogy about that topic. Students might then read an article, watch a video, or engage in an activity having to do with democracy. Provocative experiences that push students thinking in new directions are best. After the experience, students complete another 3, 2, 1. Have students share their initial and new thinking, explaining to their partners how and why their thinking shifted. Make it clear to students that their initial thinking is not right or wrong, it is just a starting point, and that new experiences take our thinking in new directions.

1846: Portrait of the Nation

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Website looking back at the important historical events of 1846, the year the Smithsonian was founded. Selected paintings provide visual context for major historical events.

1812: A Nation Emerges

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Online exhibition on an epic scale. Portraits and biographies of the war's leading players (and the leading opponents of the war) add up to a complex national portrait. The cast includes former president Thomas Jefferson, future presidents Andrew Jackson and William Henry Harrison, Shawnee leader Tecumseh, first lady of first ladies Dolley Madison, and the pirate Jean Laffite.

1812 Lesson Plans

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Four lessons in which students use critical thinking skills to examine, analyze, and compare/contrast artworks to better understand the events of the War of 1812. Lessons include a historical research project that has students create a textbook entry to demonstrate their understanding.

'Pardon This Interruption�_�Columbus Has Landed!!!'

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson in which students create a public service announcement using the theme of colliding cultures in North America.

"Ódiame" by Los Tres Reyes from Romancing the Past

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Los Tres Reyes, called the last great Mexican trío romántico, performs “Ódiame.” Gilberto Puente’s arrangement of this Peruvian waltz for the requinto has become a signature of the style he created.

"Zumbaquezumba" by Grupo Cimarrón and Carlos Quintero at 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
The joropo has two veins: the hard driving golpe, and the slower, more lyrical pasaje. Golpe (from golpear "to hit, to strike") refers to the percussive, strummed cuatro patterns. There are at least eighteen common types of golpe, each with its own name and distinctive sound. Golpes are played by instruments alone, or include singing. Widely dispersed throughout the Colombo-Venezuelan plains, the zumbaquezumba is the favorite golpe for dueling verse improvisation, popular at plains fiestas, festival competitions, and shows.

"Zoe" by Tony Trischka from Territory

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
The banjo in American music was traditionally associated with bluegrass and old-time until the early 1970s when Tony Trischka spearheaded a movement to innovate the sound. In his hands, the banjo became a vehicle for greater melodic and harmonic sophistication. Through Trischka, the instrument found its way into many different musical forms from jazz to rock to classical. In his 35 year career Trischka has performed extensively in the USA and Europe as well as touring Australia, South Korea, Japan and New Zealand. He was awarded Banjo Player of the Year in 2007 by the International Bluegrass Music Association.

"Y soy Iianero" by Grupo Cimarrón from Sí, soy llanero: Joropo Music from the Orinoco Plains of Colombia

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
The lively sounds of traditional joropo music can be found throughout the plains of Colombia and Venezuela. Created by ranching people with a love of cattle, horses, music, and dance, the joropo's driving rhythm and percussive stringed instrument sound draw from centuries-old Spanish, African, and New World musical traditions that contributed to the region's unique mestizo (mixed) culture. The music reflects the pride the plains people have in their history and culture. Here, Grupo Cimarrón, a "supergroup" of Colombia's finest joropo musicians, perform "Y soy llanero" (And I Am a Plainsman), a song that extols and romanticizes the plains and its cattle ranchers.

"West Virginia, My Home" by Hazel Dickens at 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Hazel Dickens became an accomplished bluegrass performer at a time when the genre was dominated by men. She is also an admired advocate for women's and worker's rights. Along with fellow musician and friend Alice Gerrard, she empowered countless female singers and musicians to succeed without sacrificing integrity. In this performance, Dickens, herself the eighth of eleven children born to a West Virginia mining family, pays homage to her home state.

"We Are Soldiers in the Army" by The Freedom Singers from Voices of the Civil Rights Movement: Black American Freedom Songs 1960-1966

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Music was essential to the African-American struggle for civil rights and equality. "We Are Soldiers in the Army" demonstrates how the Black American traditional song repertoire and older styles of singing were used to inspire and organize the Civil Rights Movement. The singers here remind us that the days of open discrimination and bigotry are not far behind us, and that "it's people's hearts we're trying to change now." The a cappella quartet features legendary civil rights activists and singers Rutha Harris, Charles Neblett, Bettie Mae Fikes, and Cordell Reagon.

"Walking Boss" by Mike Seeger at Folkways Studio in 2007

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
For over fifty years, Mike Seeger has been a musician, documenter, and tireless advocate of American folk and traditional music. As a musician he recorded as a solo artist and member of folk revival ensemble the New Lost City Ramblers. As a collector he has captured and produced sounds by iconic artists such as Elizabeth Cotten and Dock Boggs. And finally, as a historian and preservationist of the music he calls "old time," Mike Seeger gives us the stories behind the music that is such an essential part of American culture. Here he performs and gives the history of "Walking Boss," a tune Thomas Clarence Ashley learned from African American railroad workers at the turn of the 19th century.

"Wait a Minute" by Seldom Scene from Long Time…Seldom Scene

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
The longtime pillars of the bluegrass world return with the aptly titled Long Time... Seldom Scene.

"Trovas" by Victor Espinel Sanchez from an Impromtu Recording in Colombia

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
In 2011, researchers for the Smithsonian Folklife Festival traveled to the Orinoco Plains of Colombia. Their van broke down, leading to a filming opportunity involving Felix Chaparro Rivas, Victor Espinel Sanchez, and Carlos Rojas. Here, Espinel sings trovas, impromptu verses, in the joropostyle.

"Tra Bo Dau" by Linda Griffiths and Lisa Healy at 2009 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Linda Griffiths (Aberystwyth, Wales) and her daughter, Lisa Healy, are accompanied by Ceri Rhys Matthews (Pencader, Wales).

"Tonada de gris silencio" by Rafael Manríquez

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Chilean immigrant Rafael Manríquez performs all three guitar parts during the recording of his song Tonada de gris silencio.

"Todo lo que tengo" by Quetzal from Imaginaries

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
East Los Angeles band Quetzal combines rock, traditional son jarocho, salsa, R&B, and more to express political, social, and personal struggles on their album Imaginaries. "Todo lo que tengo" (All That I Have) is a love song that acknowledges the role of the individual in a successful union.

"Through the Bottom of the Glass" by The Seldom Scene from Long Time…Seldom Scene

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Current and former members gather to celebrate the upcoming album "Long Time…Seldom Scene" available in 2014 on Smithsonian Folkways.

"The Bone Game Song" by Flora Wallace and Family at Special Concert

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Bone games are popular among American Indians across the northwestern United States of America. Two teams compete to guess where players are hiding carved animal bones. The game is accompanied by exuberant singing, drumming, or rattles. Bone game songs are very lively and fast paced, and are sung with full voices. The players hiding the bones often gesture expressively in time with the music. In earlier times, it was usually men who competed, but nowadays women and youth participate, too. Laura Wallace and her family perform "The Bone Game Song" with percussive accompaniment and animated gestures.

"Tears for Kientepoos" by Mary Youngblood at the 1998 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Achugash Aleut and Seminole, Mary Youngblood was raised in Seattle and now lives in Sacramento, California. She is active in the American Indian community there, working with the Urban Indian Health Project and the American Indian Women's Talking Circle. Trained in guitar, piano, voice, and flute, she is also a songwriter and poet; music has played a pivotal role in her life. She began playing the Plains–style cedar and redwood flute in 1993, taking up an instrument played until the last several years primarily by men. Here she performs "Tears for Kientepoos" at a 1998 concert honoring American Indian women.

"Sunny Day" by Elizabeth Mitchell from Sunny Day

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Music video for the song "Sunny Day" Elizabeth Mitchell’s 2010 album of the same name. It’s the story of a magic harmonica and a girl dreaming of the first day of spring. Directed by Emily Bennison, Art Direction by Jacinta Bunnell, filmed in High Falls NY, January 2011.
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