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Found 336 Resources

Frans Wildenhain to Peter Schneider

Archives of American Art
Letter : 1 p. : handwritten ; 28 x 22 cm.

Photograph of Diego Rivera on studio roof

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 21 x 25 cm.

Photograph of Diego Rivera standing on the roof of his studio in Mexico City, Mexico, where he lived between 1932 and 1939.

Photograph of Violet Oakley with her mural Unity

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : sepia ; 18 x 13 cm. Violet Oakley standing beside a portion of her mural Unity at the Pennsylvania State Capitol.
Date based on date of commission and work on mural.

A cartoon of Earth for the National Academy of Sciences mural.

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 6 x 9 cm.

This cartoon was the initial design for what Hildreth Meiere would eventually paint on to gessoed tiles that would adorn the dome in the Great Hall at National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

Robert Franklin gates with reproduction of his mural for the post office in Bethesda, Md.

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : silver gelatin ; 27 x 23 cm.

Stuyvesant Van Veen at work

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 21 x 25 cm. Stuyvesant Van Veen working on a mural in the Pittsburgh Post Office.

handwritten on verso: Pittsburgh Post Office Court House, S. Van Veen

Peace on Earth Good Will Toward Men

National Museum of American History
This color aquatint represents two angels: one holding flowers, the other playing the flute. A tree is growing between them and a light is shining through the branches on the top of the angels. The hand lettering below the image is elegantly done and provides a good example of integration of text with image. Miss Clements was a painter, muralist, art teacher and etcher.

Mat

National Museum of the American Indian

House of Tears: Fighting Women [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Reed, Alma, "Jose Clemente Orozco," NY: Hacker Art Books, 1985, pg. 234.

Reed, Alma, "Orozco: Jose Clemente Orozco," Dresden: VEB Verlag der Kunst, 1979, no. 1.

Reed, Alma M., "The Mexican Muralists," NY: Crown Publishers, 1960, pg. 44.

Helm, MacKinley, "Man of Fire: J. C. Orozco," NY: Harcourt, Brace & Co., 1953, no. 123.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Gallery of Modern Art.

Mat

National Museum of the American Indian

Diego Rivera at work on "Allegory of California," San Francisco Stock Exchange Luncheon Club, 1931 [photograph] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Hurlburt, Laurance P., "Mexican Muralists in the United States," Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1989, pg. 105.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Diego Rivera, Mexican painter, 1886-1957.

Edwin Howland Blashfield in his studio, standing in front of his easel painting "Rain," [photograph] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Edwin Howland Blashfield, American painter, 1848-1936.

Weiner, Mina Rieur, ed., Edwin Howland Blashfield: Master American Muralist. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. in association with Institute of Classical Architecture and Classical America, 2009, pg. 142.

Saddle blanket

National Museum of the American Indian

Study: Worker [drawing] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Preliminary sketch for the fresco "Creative Man," University of Guadalarja Rotunda.

Title supplied by cataloger.

Rochfort, Desmond, "Mexican Muralists: Orozco, Rivera, Siqueiros," San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 1998, fig. 150.

Time Magazine (October 1, 1965): pg. 86.

The New York Times, September 12, 1965, Sect. X, pg. 27.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Gallery of Modern Art.

Model of a school in Attleboro, Mass., complete with mock-up of a mural by Robert Motherwell

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 19 x 24 cm. Date based on a handwritten note on verso: "The muralist and the modern architect."
This was an exhibit held at the Kootz Gallery in October 1950.

House of Tears: Fighting Women [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Helm, MacKinley, "Man of Fire: J. C. Orozco," NY: Harcourt, Brace & Co., 1953.

Reed, Alma, "Jose Clemente Orozco," NY: Hacker Art Books, 1985.

Reed, Alma M., "The Mexican Muralists," NY: Crown Publishers, 1960.

Color study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 5x7, Safety, CT.

copy 1 negative: 4x5, Safety, BW.

Knop, Mr.

Portrait of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera with dog

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 25 x 20 cm.

Black and white portrait of Diego Rivera, seated and holding what may be a xoloitzcuintli dog, with Frida Kahlo, standing.

Mat

National Museum of the American Indian

Blanket

National Museum of the American Indian

Alumni, Art Student's League

National Portrait Gallery

Albus Cavus and the Renaissance of Washington, D.C.

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Peter Krsko, coordinator of artists’ collective Albus Cavus, recently gave Smithsonian interns a tour of the murals of Washington, D.C. As showcases of creativity and talent, these murals challenge negative connotations associated with graffiti art and are among the many murals that can now be found all over D.C. As demonstrated by the Citified program at the Festival, members of the Albus Cavus cooperative are engaging the residential communities east of the Anacostia River.

Peter believes that public art has the ability to transform a city, and that Washington, D.C., is in the midst of an invigorating arts revival. Peter talked enthusiastically about local artists who are working collaboratively on these community art projects. He described the people of Wards Seven and Eight as welcoming and open to him as both an individual and as an artist.  He also stressed that mural projects been taking place not only east of the Anacostia River, but also throughout all of D.C.

Murals have the ability to motivate people of all ages to work together and beautify their neighborhoods. These murals reflect what the people of the community want to see outside their homes and thus showcase the strengths, perseverance, and ideals of the community. From back alleys to major thoroughfares, murals have become an important form of communal representation in the D.C. art scene.

Peter Krsko and other local artists and members of Albus Cavus are painting a mural of their own as part of the Festival's Citified program.

See images from Krsko's tour of D.C. Click on images to enlarge.  All photos by Kate Aebischer

Kate Aebischer is an intern with the Citified program at the 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. She is studying anthropology at The College of New Jersey.

Oral history interview with Barbara Carrasco, 1999 April 13-26

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 87 pages An interview of Barbara Carrasco conducted 1999 April 13 and 26, by Jeffrey Rangel, in two sessions, for the Archives of American Art.
Carrasco speaks of the roles played by her parents in her career as an artist, her experiences as a light-skinned Chicana, and the marginalization of women artists within the Chicano art movement; her relationship and marriage to fellow artist, Harry Gamboa, Jr., who has supported women artists; and her perception of Asco ("nausea" in Spanish), a group of artists and performers who joined together during the Chicano civil rights movement. She also discusses the influence of the art professors at UCLA and the quality of the training she received there; working with Carlos Almaraz and John Valadez on the "Zoot Suit" mural in Hollywood; meeting César Chávez and how he in part shaped her identity as a cultural worker; attending California School of Fine Arts, Valencia, California, and receiving her MFA there; other Chicana artists such as Carmen Lomas Garza; and the changes in her most recent work.

Oral history interview with Jesse Treviño, 2004 July 15-16

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 77 pages An interview of Jesse Treviño conducted 2004 July 15-16, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in San Antonio, Texas.
Treviño discusses his birth in Monterrey, Mexico; moving to San Antonio; being one of 12 children; attending the Art Students League of New York; being drafted into Vietnam; the Mekong Delta; falling into a booby trap and being badly wounded; the long recovery and the subsequent amputation of his right hand; learning to paint with his left hand; his first shows; his "Mi Vida" self-portrait; the numerous poster contests he won as a youth; his art training; the difficulty in organizing Chicano art shows; the relationships with his siblings, particularly his oldest sister, Eva; his Santa Rosa Hospital mural ("Spirit of Healing"); and the importance of public art, particularly murals. Treviño also discusses his Veladora; his early left-handed paintings; the classification of himself as a "Realist"; how he chooses the sites he paints; helping form the Alameda/Smithsonian art center; being invited to talk at veteran's groups and high schools; his early paintings on black canvas; his new public art project on San Antonio's notorious Guadalupe Street; his Wells Fargo Bank mural and its formation; his interest, or lack thereof, in photography; his portraits of Henry B. Gonzales and his mother; his painting, "Mis Hermanos;" his successful one man show at the San Antonio Museum of Art; his relationships with galleries; the rejuvenating qualities of art in poor neighborhoods; his trip to Chile with Hillary Clinton, as part of her First Lady's Convention; being honored at the White House; and how he wants his art to unite people. Treviño also recalls William Draper, Felipe Reyes, Katherine Alsup, Earl Mayan, George Cortex, Gilbert Denman, Kevin Consey, Lionel Sosa, and others.

Oral history interview with Willie Herrón, 2000 Feb. 5-Mar. 17

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 7 sound cassettes (6 hrs.) : analog. Transcript: 109 p. An interview of Willie Herrón conducted 2000 Feb. 5-Mar. 17, by Jeffrey J. Rangel, for the Archives of American Art.
The interviews took place in a restaurant, City Terrace, East Los Angeles, Calif. Herrón describes his childhood growing up in East Los Angeles, culminating with an extensive discussion of the circumstances surrounding the painting of his most acclaimed mural, "The Wall that Cracked Open" in City Terrace; founding the avant-garde Chicano art group Asco along with Harry Gamboa, Jr., Patssi Valdez, and Gronk; his experience as leader of the band Los Illegals and as a cofounder of the alternative music space Club Vex with Self Help Graphics' Sister Karen Boccalero; the Chicano mural movement, particularly his undertakings in City Terrace, Boyle Heights, and at the Estrada Courts and Ramona Gardens housing projects in East Los Angeles; his commitment to working with at-risk youth and his strong desire to expand the stylistic and iconographic parameters of the medium through the incorporation of graffiti; and an assessment of Asco's role in expanding the continuum of Chicano art and identity.
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