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Found 6,947 Collections

 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Ethiopia")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece Ethiopia by Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller (1921), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the 1920s in America, including the Harlem Renaissance. Fuller's piece reflects the racial politics of the period, especially African Americans' quest for self identity. Ethiopia serves as a symbol of African Americans' identity exploration post-World War II and in the midst of the Pan-African movement.

The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Walking")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece "Walking" by Charles Henry Alston (1958), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the 1950's including the Civil Rights Movement and the role of women as social activists while honing their visual literacy competency. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Trapped")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through visual and historical analysis of the art piece "Trapped" Alvin Carl Hollingsworth (1965), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the late 1960's including discriminatory housing policies and the Black Arts Movement. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
11
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Urban Mask")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece Urban Mask by Chakaia Booker (2001), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the early 2000s in America. Booker's piece reflects the tumultuous political and social climate of the period. Her sculpture speaks issues important to the artist, including the diversity of the black community and environmental degradation in urban landscapes. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills, hone their visual literacy competency, and expand their conceptions of historical sources. 

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Increase Risk with Emotional Faith")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece "Increase Risk with Emotional Faith" by Kevin E. Cole (2008), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the early 2000's including the economic recession and the election of Barack Obama. Cole's piece directly speaks to the racial politics evident in devastation of Hurricane Katrina and the violent history of segregation in the South. 

The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("View of Lake Okanagan")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece View of Lake Okanagan by Grafton Tyler Brown (1882), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the late 1800s in America. Brown's piece reflects the burgeoning environmental movement. Americans' heightened appreciation for natural lands led to the development of national parks. As a black man who passed for white his entire adult life, Brown offers a unique perspective. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Please Do Touch the Paintings: Hands-on Art Projects from NMAAHC (Portraiture)

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the art of portraiture through Amy Sherald's piece Grand Dame Queenie (2012). 

Portraiture provides an avenue for self-expression and identity building unlike any other genre of visual art. Studying portraiture can be a great introduction to self-reflection and biography for young minds. 

Visitors to this Learning Lab collection will have the opportunity  to learn more about Amy Sherald and her approach to portraiture while trying their hand at their own portrait! The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students develop their ability to follow instructions and hone their skills in drawing, design thinking, writing competency, and creative expression. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is portraiture?
  • How can artists express themselves through portraiture?
  • What can we learn about portraiture as an art though drawing our own portraits?
  • How do artists talk about their work? 
  • How can we use art to tell stories or relay information?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
10
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Off to War")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece Off to War by William H. Johnson (1942-1944), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the 1940s in America. Johnson’s piece responds to the tumultuous political and social climate of the period with a consciously naïve depiction of an African American family sending their son off to war. His painting sheds light on the deeply personal impact of World War II on domestic America, especially the African American community. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills, hone their visual literacy competency, and expand their conceptions of historical sources. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Area Artists: Washington, D.C.

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore three different visual artists with ties to Washington, D.C.

As a black women artists, Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones encountered many barriers to success. All three artists lived and worked in Washington, D.C. throughout their careers. They contributed to the social, artistic, and academic communities within the nation's capital and beyond. 

Visitors to this Learning Lab collection will have the opportunity  to learn more about Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones, and their approaches to art and art making. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students develop their knowledge of Washington D.C. history and foster an appreciation for great artists. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • Who are Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones?
  • How were these artists' personal lives and artistic practices shaped by their time in Washington, D.C.?
  • What inspired each artist to create their works?
  • How are the artists' works similar? How are they different?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
13
 

In Full Color: The Black Arts Movement of the 1960s-70s

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 70s. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through this collection of resources from different Smithsonian museum and biographies of famous artists, students will learn more about the major influences and themes of this period of African American revolution and expression. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in synthesizing information and analyzing primary sources. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What are the dominant themes of the social and political climate of the 1960s and 70s?
  • How did the major events of the 1960s and 70s shape the artistic production of the period?
  • Who were some of the influential figures in the Black Arts Movement?
  • What are some of the shared goals of African American artists during the 1960s and 70s?
  • How did artists during this period respond to the the social and political climate?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
36
 

Please Do Touch the Paintings: Hands-on Art Projects from NMAAHC (Still Life)

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore still life creation through Charles Ethan Porter's piece Still Life with Roses (ca. 1885-87). 

Still life provides an avenue for exploration and observation unlike any other genre of visual art. Studying still life arrangements can be a great introduction to geometric analysis and spatial awareness for young minds. 

Visitors to this Learning Lab collection will have the opportunity  to learn more about nineteenth-century painter, Charles Ethan Porter, and his approach to still life painting while trying their hand at arranging their own still life! The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students develop their ability to follow instructions and hone their skills in observation, spatial analysis, and creative expression. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is a still life?
  • How can artists express themselves and tell stories through still life works?
  • What are some connections between art and mathematical principles?
  • How can we explore geometry through arranging a still life?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
10
 

Please Do Touch the Paintings: Hands-on Art Projects from NMAAHC (Abstract Art)

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore abstract art through Alma Thomas's piece Suddenly It's Spring (1970). 

Still life provides an avenue for exploration and observation unlike any other genre of visual art. Studying still life arrangements can be a great introduction to geometric analysis and spatial awareness for young minds. 

Visitors to this Learning Lab collection will have the opportunity  to learn more about Washington D.C.-based artist, Alma Thomas, and her approach to abstract art while trying their hand at creating their own colorful work! The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students develop their ability to follow instructions and hone their skills in observation, narrative building, and creative expression. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is abstract art?
  • Why is color so important to Alma Thomas's work?
  • What are some connections between abstract art and the natural world?
  • How can we explore storytelling through artistic means?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
9
 

James Smithson: What's in a Name?

Do you know how the Smithsonian got its name?  If you answered "no" you are not alone.  A lot of people know about the Smithsonian Institution, but they don't know about the man who gave his name and bequest to create what has become the largest museum complex and research center in the world.

Curious?  Well, here's the story...

Laura Shafer
11
 

Memorial Day Celebration: Native American Veterans

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Native American Veterans. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they used to think and what they think now that they learned more. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about World War II as well as explore code talkers during wars. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

Ellen Rogers
19
 

Viral Histories: Asian Americans and the Food Service Industry

How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Genevieve Villamora, co-owner of the Washington, DC-based restaurant Bad Saint, about the impacts of COVID-19 on the food service industry. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Genevieve Villamora's interview by providing additional information about the history of Asian Americans in the American food service industry and stories about Asian American foodways. As you explore the resources in this collection, and reflect on Genevieve Villamora's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

#ViralHistories 

 

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
19
 

Subject: Photo Albums

#nmahphc

This is a sampling of photographic albums from the Photographic History Collection.

Please note, viewing these albums may require patience on the part of the viewer. Most of these albums have pages visible to the public. The pages may be included in photographs attached to the "More Info" record. If pages are not individually visible through the record, go to collections.si.edu and search for the catalog number found on the "More Info" record; the pages of the album can be seen in a pdf slide show.

The Photographic History Collection contains many albums with and without images. For additional photographic objects, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: photo album, photography album, album pages, gem tintypes, carte-de-visite, cartes-de-visite, cabinet card, cigarette cards, studio photography, studio portraiture, snapshots, travel photography, celebrity photography, collectible photography, vernacular photography, portrait photography, Civil War, WWI, photography, family record keeping, Disneyland, Disneyworld, tourist destinations, yearbooks, college years, cyanotypes, circus, scrapbook, wallpaper sample book, composition notebook, actors, actresses, stage performers, soldiers, photographers

(The objects included in this Learning Lab collection are all intact albums. Not included are individual album pages or photographic images that were previously included in albums or books.)


NMAH Photographic History Collection
29
 

Final

Carlos Portanova
32
 

Final Project

 why our participation is important in our government.

Gabriel Rodriguez
30
 

S.S. Final

I would like to pass the 8th grade please 

Natalie Escalante
15
 

Beautiful Orchids at the Smithsonian

This collection represents some of my personal favorites from the project to digitize more than 8,000 living specimens of the Orchidaceae family, in the Smithsonian Gardens Orchid Collection.

There are thousands (at the time of publishing) orchid specimens available here in the Learning Lab. Find your own favorites using this search.

Learn more in the Smithsonian Insider article, "See thousands of orchids in incredible detail in the Smithsonian’s newly digitized collection."

Darren Milligan
56
 

Art + Social Emotional Learning (SEL)

An online teacher workshop exploring art and mindful integration of social-emotional skills.

Tuesday, May, 19, 2020

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
13
 

Timeline through History

History has been a lesson for all of us. We see that history very closely correlates with the Biblical timeline of events. We'll try to trace some of those events in this collection.

Angelin Abraham
30
 

Dr. Emma Lucy Braun

Emma Lucy Braun was born in Cincinnati in 1889 and lived her whole life in Ohio and Kentucky between western trips with her sister Annette. Lucy received a master in geology in 1912, a Ph.D. in botany at Cincinnati University. Characterized by a devoted study of plants, Lucy’s career culminates with her book Deciduous Forests of Eastern Northern America in 1950. She revolutionized her field study by considering mixed mesophytic forests as coherent system, studying the relationship between organisms and the environments, and their relationship to each other. The researches Lucy Braun engaged in Ohio and in Kentucky led to her innovative work in plant ecology and to the development of plant ecology as an academic discipline.

It was an inherited tradition in the Braun family to encourage women to collect plants and to make a herbarium. Lucy’s collection, which she held since she was young, rose to 12,000 species until her death in 1971. Among these many species, the herbarium includes a specimen of Panax Quinquefolius L., the American ginseng, now on display in the Smithsonian's Herbarium.

Lucy Braun traveled across states and realized a photo album which is now compiled at the Smithsonian Archives.
Her legacy is still present today and extends for future generations.

More information:

Smithsonian Archives, Lucy Braun's Album:
https://siarchives.si.edu/coll...

Documentary "A Force for Nature: Lucy Braun":

https://www.ket.org/program/a-force-for-nature-lucy-braun/



Sources:
“A Force for Nature: Lucy Braun – About.” Voyageur Media Group, February 12, 2019. https://voyageurmedia.org/lucy....
“Dr. E. Lucy Braun.” Cincinnati Museum Center. Accessed March 16, 2020. https://www.cincymuseum.org/dr....
Memories Of E. Lucy Braun, Lucile Durrell, 1981. Ohio BioI. Surv. BioI. Notes No. 15.
Emma lucy braun.” Pine mountain settlement school collections. Accessed March 16, 2020. https://pinemountainsettlement....

BL B
9
 

Joseph Henry, scientist, inventor, educator, first Smithsonian Secretary: Once perhaps the most famous U.S. scientist

First Secretary of the Smithsonian, Joseph Henry, was enormously famous in his time and much accomplished as a scientist and inventor. Here is a peek at his life and what he left for history to find.  You will find photos and documents about Henry’s life  and family and how he laid the foundation for the Smithsonian as the world’s largest museum and research complex. 

Linda Feldman
21
193-216 of 6,947 Collections