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Found 1,997 Collections

 

Spanish-American War

This collection highlights artifacts and secondary sources to help students explore the history of the Spanish-American War. Specific topics referenced in this collection include the explosion of US Maine and political and military figures.

Time Period: April 21, 1898 - August 13, 1898 (approx. 5 months)

National Museum of American History
24
 

Formats and Processes: Press Prints

#nmahphc

This is an assortment of press prints from a larger collection in the Photographic History Collection at the National Museum of American History.  Press prints were distributed from news agencies, such as AP, UPI, Acme, OWI, and the Signal Corp, to newspapers for print publication. Many of the images have paper captions attached or have captions printed on the verso (back of the photograph). The captions may offer image, event, photographer, date, and other information such as when and where the photograph was printed. [Use suggestion, click on the image and follow link to "more info" to see if the verso has been photographed.]

The image content of press prints is wide ranging including breaking news, parades, celebrities, travel photography, crisis reporting, protests and marches, police activity, information distribution, and more.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: visual culture, photojournalism, press photography, world events, national history, refugees, victims, honor, award, parade, march, protest, agriculture, industry, farmers, home building, maps, travel photography, portraiture, grief, war photography, horse racing, sports, fans

In the Learning Lab, for head shots and press prints related to entertainment, see Theatre and Movie Stills. There may be additional press prints included in the Learning Lab collection, Protests, Marches, and Reform

NMAH Photographic History Collection
154
 

The Flu

Understanding the Pandemic
Colleen Stevens
3
 

The Flu

Understanding the Pandemic

Colleen Stevens
0
 

Exploring Art with Quilts at the Anacostia Community Museum

This collection of quilts offers material to challenge conventional definitions of art and artists, explore the many different ways to tell a visual story and spark discussions about the traditions that are passed down in families. This resource is structured around 2 hour-long lessons in art analysis, a creative task and a reflection session.

A range of styles and traditions are represented here, as each quilt and quilter has their own story to tell. The story can be evident in the visual content of the quilt, but the context in which it was created can be equally important. Quilting is an art form taught between generations and amongst friends, bridging the gap between material culture and intangible heritage.

By encouraging young learners to look closely and develop evidence-based arguments, we can hope to build their skills to think deeply about the interrelationship of art, memory and community.

Enclosed in the Teacher's Resource is a list of quilts, short biographies of the artists and potential discussion questions. Also included are suggested art and craft activities, and an annotated bibliography for educators who want to do more research on the topic.

Goals:

  • How can we express things that are important to us?
  • How can quilts teach us about community?

Objectives:

  • Challenge and expand definitions of “art” and “artist.”
  • Develop a toolkit for visual analysis.
  • Understand different forms of creative self-expression.
  • Learn about traditions we share in our communities and pass between generations.
  • Empower students’ creativity.
Celine Romano
14
 

Photographer: Baughman, J. Ross

#nmahphc

The J. Ross Baughman collection in the Photographic History Collection at the National Museum of American History includes some 290 photographs, his Pulitzer prize, five contact sheets, an album, two books, and cameras.  The photographs include various subjects such as his time in the Middle East, an unpublished series entitled Beautified, as well as, prints from Baughman's image assignments for Life magazine during the 1980s , including a story about two gay fathers.

Some of Baughman's cameras are seen the PHC's Learning Lab collection, Leicas.

Objects from Baughman's career and professional experiences can be found in two other National Museum of American History Collections (accessions 2010.0228 and 2010.0229).

For additional materials, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: photojournalist, photojournalism, Rhodesia, Pulitzer Prize, undercover work,  journalism, photography and danger, newspapers, print culture, picture magazines, print journalism, freelance photographer, controversy, contemporary politics, international affairs, protest, community activism, AIDS, gay family life, military, mercenaries





NMAH Photographic History Collection
53
 

Format and Process: View-Master

#nmahphc

This is a small sampling of reels and viewers related to View-Masters that are included in the Photographic History Collection. The objects in the assortment included in the Learning Lab are commercial and personal. 

For additional materials, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: stereo viewers, toy viewers, reels, entertainment

View-Masters were introduced in 1939 at the World's Fair by GAF, there are examples of these, a projector used for Sunday School lessons, and equipment used to make personal reels in the Photographic History Collection. 


NMAH Photographic History Collection
20
 

Westward Expansion Part 2

This playlist on Westward Expansion of the United States is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for middle school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual art, videos, and written texts. Students can complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom for each formative and summative assessment.

By the end of the week, students will create an original piece that an expresses an evidence-based argument that expresses their opinion how well the impacts of westward expansion align with its goals.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Tasks and Daily Check Ins).
  • Additional processing questions are included with select resources, marked by a question mark in the upper left hand corner of the resource tile.
  • Google Doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 
Cameron Mcconnell
24
 

Photographer: Black Star Photographers

#nmahphc

These photographs from the Photographic History Collection are by a number of photographers from the Black Star News Agency. Most of the photographs date from the late 1950s through the 1960s. They were acquired by the museum before 1971.

Some images may be copyrighted.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu

Keywords: photojournalist, photojournalism, news photography, editorial photography, documentary photography, reportage 

Photographers in this collection:

  • Anthony, Eugene
  • Crane, Ralph
  • Haun, Declan
  • Herron, Matt
  • Hershorn, Shell
  • Lackenbach, Robert
  • Launois, John
  • Lawrence, Nick
  • Lockwood, Lee
  • Lukas, Jan
  • Massar, Ivan
  • Mayer, Heini
  • McCoy, Dan
  • Merritt, Vernon
  • Moore, Charles
  • Moore, David
  • Moss, John
  • Muramatsu, Konosuke
  • Salmo, Frank
  • Schapiro, Steve
  • Schulke, Flip
  • Schulthees, Emil
  • St. Gil, Mark
  • Strode, Bill
  • Swanson, Richard
  • Tsagris, Athanasios
  • Ward, Fred
  • Wilhelm, Henry
  • Wolff, Werner
  • Zagarino, Frank


NMAH Photographic History Collection
53
 

Subject: Civil War albums

#nmahphc

This collection contains xx albums related to the Civil War and some sample pages.  To see additional album pages click on the "more info" on the object's record page.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords:

Albums represented in this Learning Lab collection:

United States Civil War contains portraits of major players of the war and was assembled by the President of Switzerland in the 1860s. Subjects are labeled in German.

1860 Rutgers Yearbook, was owned by Texan George Washington McNeel. This yearbooks contains messages from his professors and fellow students. 

CDV album from photographer George K. Warren's collection. The album may have either been used as a studio sales album offering individual cartes-de-visite for sale or may have been assembled by the photographer or his family.

Gardner's Sketchbook of the War Vol. 1 & Vol. 2 contains texts written by Alexander Gardner, photographic negatives made by several photographers including Timothy O'Sullivan.

NMAH Photographic History Collection
85
 

Subject: Civil War portraits

#nmahphc

This is a selection of photographs from the Photographic History Collection of people who served in or adjacent to the military during the American Civil War. Most of the portraits are those who served in the military and the government. This this selection includes an African American washerwoman, Mary Todd Lincoln, photographer Mathew Brady, John Wilkes Booth, and two caricature portraits to represent political ideas.

In the Learning Lab, see also the Seville Collection in which individual soldiers have biographical information and Civil War Albums to see the Gardner's Sketchbook of the War.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: portrait, solider, washerwoman, carte-de-visite, CDV, flag, uniform, soldier, tintype, ambrotype, military, general, colonel, studio portrait, hand-colored, hand-coloring, nurse, African American women, Union Army, president, First Lady, political ideology, wartime

NMAH Photographic History Collection
64
 

Cameras and Apparatus: Mutoscopes and Title Cards

#nmahphc

This is a selection of mutoscope title cards and apparatus. 

The Mutoscope Collection in the National Museum of American History’s Photographic History Collection is among the most significant of its kind in any museum. Composed of 3 cameras, 13 viewers, 59 movie reels, and 53 title cards (movie posters), the collection documents the early years of the most successful and influential motion picture company of the industry’s formative period. It also showcases a unique style of movie exhibition that outlasted its early competitors, existing well into the 20th century.

Keywords: Mutoscope, early motion picture, moving picture, movie 

Written by Ryan Lintelman for a finding aid for the Photographic History Collection:

 The American Mutoscope Company was founded in 1895 by a group of four men, Elias Koopman, Herman Casler, Henry Marvin, and William Kennedy Laurie Dickson, to manufacture a motion picture viewer called the mutoscope, and to produce films for exhibition. 

Dickson had recently left the employ of Thomas Edison, for whom he had solved the problem of “doing for the eye what the phonograph does for the ear” by inventing the modern motion picture. Casler and Dickson worked together to perfect the mutoscope, which exhibited films transferred to a series of cards mounted in the style of a flip book on a metal core, and avoided Edison’s patents with this slightly different style of exhibition. 

The company’s headquarters in New York City featured a rooftop studio on a turntable to ensure favorable illumination, and the short subjects made here found such success that by 1897, the Edison company’s dominance of the industry was in danger. American Mutoscope became American Mutoscope & Biograph in 1899, when the namesake projector, invented by Casler, became the most used in the industry.

Mutoscope viewers were found in many amusement areas and arcades until at least the 1960s. Their inexpensiveness and short, often comical or sensational subjects allowed the machines a far longer life than the competing Edison Kinetoscope. The company also found success in its production and projection of motion pictures, though its activity was mired by patent litigation involving Thomas Edison through the 1910s. 

The notable director D. W. Griffith was first hired as an actor, working with pioneering cinematographer G. W. “Billy” Bitzer, before moving behind the camera at Biograph, and making 450 films for the company. Griffith and Bitzer invented cinematographic techniques like the fade-out and iris shot, made the first film in Hollywood, and launched the careers of early stars Mary Pickford and Lillian Gish. The company, simply renamed the Biograph Company in 1909, went out of business in 1928, after losing Griffith and facing a changing movie industry.  

The Museum’s collection was acquired in the years between 1926 and the mid-1970s. The original mutograph camera and two later models of the camera were given to the Smithsonian in 1926 by the International Mutoscope Reel Company, which inherited Biograph’s mutoscope works and continued making the viewers and reels through the 1940s. 

The viewers, reels, and posters in the collection were acquired for exhibition in the National Museum of American History, and were later accessioned as objects in the Photographic History Collection. Many of the mutoscope reels in the collection date to the period from 1896-1905, and show early motion picture subjects, some of which were thought to be lost films before their examination in 2008.


NMAH Photographic History Collection
64
 

Cameras and Apparatus: Leica Cameras

#nmahphc

This is a selection of Leica cameras from Photographic History Collection (PHC) at the National Museum of American History (NMAH). The PHC holds  has a significant collection of Leica cameras, lenses, and accessories totaling more than 200 items including over 25 cameras from the 1920s to the 2000s. This Learning Lab collection includes a pdf finding aid for Leica cameras.  Included in the PHC are cameras used by photojournalists Carl Mydans and J. Ross Baughman.

For additional collections, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: Leica, Barnack, 35mm, photography, camera

From the finding aid written by Anthony Brooks:
Leica Cameras have a unique position in the history of 35mm film photography. The Leica was not the first still camera taking 35mm film. It was not even the first commercially successful 35mm camera, but it set the gold standard for all other 35mm cameras and turned 35mm cameras from toys into serious professional tools.

The 35mm film gauge was first introduced in 1892 by Kodak for use by Thomas Edison to make movie films. Edison quickly settled on a standard frame size (18 x 24mm) with four sprocket holes per frame. This movie standard has remained unchanged. The growth of the movie industry in the early twentieth century required large quantities of 35mm film. 1000 feet of 35mm movie film creates less than 20 minutes of movie images. Soon there was interest in using this film for still photography and after 1910, the first 35mm cameras appeared. Most of the early 35mm camera designs used the single frame 18x24mm format and many used lengths of film capable of taking a hundred or more exposures. The quality of photographs from this small format was often disappointing and the number of exposures was a deterrent to amateur photographers. A contemporary small Kodak vest pocket camera took larger negatives on an eight exposure roll and produced better quality prints. The majority of early 35mm cameras were not commercially successful and are rare today. One exception was the American made Ansco Memo introduced in 1926 that for a few years had a dedicated following. However, the introduction of the Leica 35mm camera was to dramatically change the status of 35mm photography. 

The Leica was designed by Oscar Barnack, an employee of the Leitz Optical Company based in Wetzlar, Germany. Barnack may have conceived the first Leica for test exposures in the 18x24mm single frame format. Test exposures were often taken to check the lighting set-up for movies and portraits. However, at some point Barnack decided to design a 35mm camera for photography in its own right. In order to improve
image quality Barnack used two single frames and thus the standard 35mm film frame was born. The PHC contains many significant items that represent the history of Leica cameras.



NMAH Photographic History Collection
18
 

Subject: Theatre

#nmahphc

This is an assortment of photographs related to stage performances in theaters,  acting, plays, and musical theater, and revues from the Photographic History Collection. The date range for these photographs is mostly, but not exclusively, 1910s-1950s.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: theater, theatre, stage, play, plays, actor, actress, orchestra, set design, musicals, musical revues, costume design, lighting design, performance, spoken word, Broadway, Jewish theatre, John F. Kennedy Center

NMAH Photographic History Collection
122
 

World War II at Home and Beyond

The Second World War (1939-1945), while global, did not fully impact the United States until the military attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. This collection is a snapshot of the lives of Americans both on the battlefield and on the Homefront. Portraiture can be used as a springboard into deeper discussions about biography and our collective history. Users of this collection are encouraged to take into account how the sitter’s social and political identities play a role in how they experienced the war.

Guiding questions:

Who are the notable political and military figures of the war? How does portraiture capture their respective reputations?

In what ways did the Second World War impact the lives of men and women from underrepresented groups? What is the legacy of this impact?

How did the entertainment industry rally around the troops during the war?

What was the role of journalism, literature, and documentary film during the war? How were these formats used to disseminate information to the American public?


Ashleigh Coren
48
 

Our Journeys Our Stories: Portraits of Latino Achievement | Nuestros Caminos Nuestras Historias: Retratos del Logro Latino

This bilingual resource serves middle and high school teachers and students as well as lifelong learners. 

Our Journeys/Our Stories: Portraits of Latino Achievement explores the diversity of the Latino experience in its portrayal of a group of extraordinary men and women and the stories they tell. Like the exhibition, this companion book combines personal narratives, portraits, and dichos, or traditional sayings, to provide an inspirational, illustrated anthology of Latino accomplishments across generations.

People of all ages and backgrounds will be engaged by these inspirational stories and portraits of Latinos who have made significant contributions to American life. By telling the stories of leaders in the Latino community who display outstanding character traits, such as dedication, discipline, perseverance, integrity, passion, responsibility, courage, and commitment, this anthology provides multiple views of achievement that will motivate many other Americans to realize their own dreams.

Este recurso bilingüe sirve a estudiantes de secundaria y preparatoria (high school) y a aprendices de todas edades.

Nuestros Caminos/Nuestras Historias: Retratos del Logro Latino explora la diversidad de la vivencia latina al presentar de un grupo de hombres y mujeres extraordinarios y las historias que ellos nos cuentan. Así como la exhibición, esta publicación complementaria combina anécdotas personales, retratos y relatos orales tradicionales para ofrecer una antología ilustrada de inspiración sobre los logros de los latinos a través de distintas generaciones.

Personas de todas las edades y orígenes se sentirán atraídas por estas historias y retratos de latinos que contribuyeron de manera significativa a la vida estadounidense. Al contar la historia de los líderes de la comunidad latina que demuestran características sobresalientes como dedicación, disciplina, perseverancia, integridad, pasión, responsabilidad, valor y compromiso, esta antología ofrece múltiples facetas del logro que motivará a muchos otros estadounidenses a materializar sus propios sueños.

Smithsonian Latino Center
4
 

Four Eyes are Better Than One

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring our eyes. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about our eyes as well as learn about animal vision. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
48
 

ENG 201.1

This collection is for the use of teaching "Fences" by August Wilson from the perspective of Blues Music.

Lindsay Gill
16
 

Religious Persecution

This is a collection of the historical events relating to the persecution of various religions

Nathan Assefa
5
 

Represent!

This playlist on symbolism and representation of the United States is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will create original work in the format of their choosing that demonstrates understanding of United States symbolism.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
57
 

The National Numismatic Collection's German Notgeld

German Notgeld is a form of emergency currency that was created by cities and towns under German control following World War I. In a time of uncertainty that impacted the nation’s financial system, these locally issued notes supplemented what the government was able to provide. Often the notes are highly illustrated and colorful depicting the identities of the towns. Images such as legends, folklore, cityscapes, landscapes, historic events, landmarks, and important people appear on the notes serving as a place where the townspeople could take pride in their homes. This is a sample of some of the German Notgeld notes in the Smithsonian's National Numismatic Collection.

Alisha Ankin
110
 

Subject: Domestic Kitchens

#nmahphc

This is an assortment of photographs featuring domestic kitchens from the Photographic History Collection. The photographs appear in many different formats and process, and were created by professional and amateur photographers for a variety of purposes, such as commercial, advertising, documentary, social commentary, snapshot, and humor. 

For this collection, "kitchen" was considered as a space within the home, a place in which food was cooked for non-military and non-commercial purposes, outdoor kitchens and cooking, and things found in kitchens. 

Additional Photographic History Collection Learning Lab collections related to food include, Food, Eateries, Agriculture, and Meals and Eating.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: kitchen, kitchen table, stove, sink, dishes, meal, cooking, meal preparation, baking, pot, pat, knife, spoon, fork, bowl, grilling, barbecuing, outdoor kitchens.

NMAH Photographic History Collection
39
 

Easy PZ: Looking: Ten Times Two (Mary Lord's Civil War Autograph Quilt)

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "Looking Ten Times Two" with an object from the National Museum of American History. #visiblethinking

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
19
 

Well Done, Sister Suffragette!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring women's suffrage. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about women's suffrage as well as listen to the song "Sister Suffragette" from Mary Poppins. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
40
193-216 of 1,997 Collections