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Found 2,017 Collections

 

Expansion (1800-1860), Set 3

Set 3 of 4
Jeff Holliday
32
 

Expansion (1800-1860), Set 2

Set 2 of 4
Jeff Holliday
44
 

Expansion (1800-1860), Set 1

Set 1 of 4
Jeff Holliday
42
 

Writing Inspiration: Using Art to Spark Narrative Story Elements

The Smithsonian museum collection inspires many to research the history behind artifacts, but this collection explores the use of art and artifacts to spark creative story writing. Students will choose artifacts to craft characters, a setting, and a plot conflict to create and write a narrative story.

Targeted Vocabulary: Narrative, protagonist , antagonist, character, character traits, setting, plot, climax, and conflict.

After reading and analyzing several narrative stories for story elements such as character, setting, plot, climax, and conflict, students will use this collection to begin planning their own narrative stories.
Individuals or partners will first view the portraits and discuss possible stories behind each face before choosing a protagonist, antagonist, and supporting characters. They may begin to discuss and imagine character traits for each subject.
Next, the student will select a landscape setting in which the story may take place. The writer will describe the landscape, imagine a time period, and name the location.
Finally, the student will either choose an action artifact around which to build a major plot event, or have that slide as a minor scene in their story.
Students may use the Question Formulation Technique to garner ideas for background stories behind the faces. http://rightquestion.org/
Once the story elements are in place, the students may begin to draft narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

With the artifacts selected as the major story elements, the students may begin crafting their narrative story. The artifacts can then be displayed as illustrations in the published narratives.
Kathy Powers
66
 

Artful Thinking-American History

The students will examine various paintings by incorporating different thinking techniques to explore American History through art.
Jourdan Englert
15
 

Decoding Lincoln: Vocabulary Coding with the Gettysburg Address

This collection provides background knowledge for students while they analyze Abraham Lincoln's word choice in his speech the Gettysburg Address. Students will then participate in a vocabulary coding activity to build comprehension of the message in the speech.
Steps in Vocabulary Coding:
1. Start with a gateway question (a question to get students into the text in a non-threatening way that requires no prior knowledge or comprehension) Which word appears most often in The Gettysburg Address? Identify the word. Is it used in the same form or part of speech throughout the text? Present the text as a puzzle to solve.
2. Read aloud the Gettysburg address while students follow along.
3. Practice Coding: Directions: Code important words with a plus sign "+" above known words, and a minus sign"-" above unknown words.
Get with a partner and compare words, then list them in a T-chart.
4. After teams have selected words, the teacher briefly provides a 5 W’s and H background for the text using the slides in the collection: Who wrote it, What was it about, When was it written, Where was it set, Why was it written, and How was the text presented. For more rigor and if time allows, give teams of students one image from the collection to research and present as background knowledge for the class.
5. Group defines words: Partners whip around to share word choices, then chart words (tally repeated words.)
Choose at least six "minus" words to chart as a class and briefly define with synonyms or short phrases.
6. Teacher assigns one section of the text per group. Group finds and selects shortest definition for that word in the context of the text and summarizes the main idea of that section of text.
7. Teams share word definitions and summary while class annotates.
8. Finally, each team picks at least three of the important vocabulary words to write a group summary of the text in 1-2 sentences (starting with 5 W’s + H). Then each individual student writes a personal response to the text (how they feel, the historical impact, the meaning of the text today, etc.) using at least three new vocabulary words from the text. Highlight vocab words, and share writing with partner.



Kathy Powers
24
 

The History and Spread of Islam

This collection can be used by students to explore the founding, history, and spread of Islam. Includes short informational texts paired with artifacts from around the globe and some links to additional resources. Students are tasked with tracking the countries that are mentioned on a map, taking notes on how the religion spread, and how the religion may have changed as it spread to new areas and ethnic groups. There is a quiz to assess their understanding of these concepts at the end.

The guiding questions for this collection are:
1) Where was Islam founded and where did it spread?
2) How did the religion spread from place to place?
3) How were the practices and the beliefs adapted by the people of different geographic areas?
Kate Harris
36
 

Women's Suffrage

The Woman's Suffrage movement in America began in 1848 at the Seneca Falls Convention in an effort to enfranchise women.
Jason Smith
30
 

Immigration to America

This collection provides an overview of immigration to the United States, but emphasizes the increased immigration during the Gilded Age. Students can complete the collection independently, keeping in mind the following guided questions:
-Why have people been motivated to immigrate to the United States?
-What challenges have immigrants faced while traveling to or after arriving in the United States?
-What contributions have immigrants made to American society?
Kate Harris
20
 

Sheet Music

Sheet music from the National Museum of American History's collection.

This collection was created for the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) Arts Professional Development Day.
Naomi Coquillon
51
 

Women in World War II

This collection teaches students about the changing role of women during World War II: their role in the workplace, increasing presence in the military, and participation in voluntary organizations that supported the war. Students should think about how these activities reinforced traditional notions of gender divisions while they also allowed women to experience new activities.
Kate Harris
23
 

Visual Art and Music

This collection includes a 10-minute podcast produced by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, as well as complementary images and video featured within the discussion highlighting connections between visual art and music. Thematic questions include: How can music inspire visual art? How can art be translated into music? Lesson ideas for connecting visual art design elements and musical elements for students follow.

This collection was created for the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) Arts Professional Development Day.
Ashley Naranjo
9
 

Vernon Bailey Naturalist

Collection of information by and about Vernon Orlando Bailey
Siobhan Leachman
9
 

Comparing Musical Arrangements and Interpretations of "The Star Spangled Banner"

This collection about the National Anthem of the United States includes more than 10 performances of it, the story of Francis Scott Key’s inspiration and the British tune to which he set his lyrics. The suggested instructional strategy is a comparison/contrast exercise, with "Close Listening" questions.

This collection was created for the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) Arts Professional Development Day.
Ashley Naranjo
18
 

World War II Lesson Plans and Interactives

Collection of lesson plans and interactive websites related to World War II from the Smithsonian Institution.
Kate Harris
13
 

Proud Publisher: Heritage Bookmaking Activity

The Smithsonian has joined with book artist Sushmita Mazumdar to create a series of easy-to-do book projects designed to get families talking and creating together. In the "Today I am Here" storybook, students explore their heritage by identifying a person, place, and object to tell the story of their own personal history. Included here is a video demonstration and accompanying downloadable instructions to make your own “Today I am Here” storybook!
Ashley Naranjo
13
 

The Crusades of the Middle Ages

This collection includes resources for teachers looking for materials related to the Crusades. Students can gain insight into the weapons and nature of fighting in the Crusades by investigating the images included as well as the video on bows, while the essays and map will provide ample background information. Finally, a lesson plan from the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum explains how to design a marshmallow catapult or trebuchet!
Kate Harris
10
 

The Art of Writing and Calligraphy

This collection includes a variety of resources representing styles of writing from around the world. It encourages viewers to consider writing not only for its ability to communicate through letters and symbols, but also for its artistic value. The collection includes a video on Sumerian writing, a website on African writing systems and art, and artifacts that are examples of the writing of East Asian, Arabic, Cherokee, Hebrew, and Modern European alphabets. In addition, a few tools used for writing are included. There is some background material on each type of writing as you read through the collection.

Questions for classroom discussion and research might include:
-What is the purpose of writing? Why use hand-writing or calligraphy instead of using a computer?
-How do alphabets differ?
-How can a style of calligraphy (or font change) the interpretation of a written work?
Kate Harris
29
 

Great Ideas, Modern Art, and Advertising

This collection consists of advertisements created for the Container Corporation of America in the 1950s. Each advertisement pairs a quote from a "Great Idea of Western Man" with a work of original art. After reviewing the collection, students will create their own art work to reflect a "Great Idea" that they think is important and meaningful in the world today.
Kate Harris
11
 

How did the growth of railroads impact the economy, politics, and society in the period after the Civil War?

This assignment will help you respond to the question: How did the growth of railroads impact the economy, politics, and society in the period after the Civil War? As you work through the activity, you will want to complete the organizational chart with your analysis of each artifact or resource. When you are finished, write your essay response using information from your chart. You will submit the file to your teacher in the format they have requested.
Kate Harris
14
 

Visual Thinking Strategies

The goal of teaching visual thinking strategies is to encourage students to observe independently and back up their responses with evidence.
Annotations for each image contain key questions to help students practice visual thinking.
Linda Muller
5
 

Ancient Greek Trade

The difficult geography in Greece made trade vital to the success and survival of this civilization of city-states.
Matthew Thompson
6
 

Early Alphabet Books

A collection of alphabet books to inspire students to create their own. Alphabet books can be created using any subject and completed with any grade. They can be completed individually (one student makes a page for each letter of the alphabet) or as a group or class (each student takes one letter). Here are some ideas for topics or use with your students:
Kindergarden-1st--Pick a letter, write a sentence using that letter and illustrate.
2nd-4th--The class takes a topic such as insects and each student takes a page, researches and illustrates it.
5th-12th--Students take a topic (biography, historical topic, memoir about themselves, book that they've read) and creates an alphabet book with each page telling the story or giving information about the subject.
Annette Hibbert Nelson
13
 

Famous Americans

This collection centers around the following famous Americans: Cesar Chavez, Thomas, Jefferson, Martin Luther King, Jr, Abraham Lincoln, Thurgood Marshall, Rosa Parks, George Washington.

What to think about:
1. What do you already know about these Americans?
2. What can you learn from these images and videos?
3. What can you determine just from the picture? (What information is provided?)
4. What information do we still need?

Look through the images with these questions in mind. Then answer some of the short activity quizzes to dive deeper into history!
Marissa Troiano
29
1945-1968 of 2,017 Collections