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Found 2,266 Collections

 

A House Divided: Photography in the Civil War

How does photography of the Civil War inform us about this period? This teaching collection includes the lesson plan, A House Divided: Photography of the Civil War, published by the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Students examine Civil War photographs, write captions, and discuss how viewing photographs enhances your understanding of historical events and concepts.
Stephanie Norby
9
 

Communes, Counterculture, and the Back to the Land Movement

This collection includes a variety of photographs taken by Lisa Law. Students will examine the photographs and a few artifacts and try to draw conclusions about the ways in which the commune or back-to-the-land movement challenged the norms of traditional United States society in the 1960s and 1970s. A link to an exhibit website is include and allows students to check their assumptions, and students are asked to compare elements of the counterculture with that of mainstream 1960s and 1970s culture.

Tags: counterculture, commune, hippie, granola, back to nature, communal living, co-op, cooperative, sixties, seventies, Woodstock, change over time, compare, ashram, silent majority

Kate Harris
10
 

George Washington: A Mythical Being

In my lesson, I projected my collection through AppleTV on a screen in the front of class. I tried to play on the students' imagination and have them think about whom this character could be. Their objective was to point out specific details in the image and voice them to class. I did not have them begin guessing who the "Mythical Being" was until we got to the 7th slide. The farther we progressed, the students began to put more and more clues together. This was a good anticipatory set to our cartoon activity pertaining to George Washington's 110 Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior.

Jourdan Englert
9
 

Remember Pearl Harbor

"Remember Pearl Harbor" was a call to action, that rallied all Americans to step up and support the war in any way they could. This collection explores the symbolism and impact of lapel pins produced during World War II.

pacific_avation_museum_edu
5
 

Pop goes our Culture

A collection of cultural icons of recent memory
joe hobson
13
 

Copley & the Art of Revolutionary Figures

This learning lab consists of portraits painted by John Singleton Copley, one of America's first painters. The subjects included all played a role either prior to or during the revolution.

Arthur Glaser
14
 

The Five Pillars of Islam

This collection includes artifacts and images that represent the Five Pillars of Islam. Students should complete the chart (included as the final resource) by first explaining what each pillar is. Then, after looking through the collection, they should identify an artifact that represents each one and explain why.

Tags: Islam, Muslim, religion, Muhammad, object analysis, practice, pilgrimage, hajj, fasting, Ramadan, Shahadah, zakat, tithe, salat, prayer

Kate Harris
16
 

Sacred Texts

This is a collection of teaching resources about sacred texts used in a variety of religions. Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are all featured in many artifacts, but there are also some examples from Hinduism, Buddhism, and Daoism. Ideas for teaching and questions are located throughout the collection on the notebook tab.

Some overall guiding questions to consider using with your students might be:

-Are the texts treated as revelations? Are they inerrant? You may want to define these words with your students and ask them to research the answers.

-How do different religions treat their texts? Are there special objects or rituals used in conjunction with the texts?

-Why was it important for religious texts to be written down? How can the form of a text change who has access to the religion's teachings?

-What kinds of decorations are used in and on the texts? Why do you think that is?

Tags: Christianity, Jesus, Bible, Judaism, Torah, Old Testament, Islam, Quran, Muhammad, Hindu, Buddha, Daoism, China, India, religion, belief, philosophy, compare contrast

Kate Harris
24
 

The Three Vinegar Tasters and Daoism

This collection includes a brief overview of Daoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism. It focuses on the story of Laozi and his ideas about the Dao and the balance between yin and yang. It includes two short passages from the Dao de Jing, assessment questions throughout, and a final task where students create their own collection about Daoism.

Tags: Dao, Confucius, Tao, Buddha, Laozi, China, religion, philosophy

Kate Harris
8
 

From Ancient India to a Studio Near You: Yoga's History

This collection explores yoga's roots in ancient India and how its practice has changed as it has migrated to the West. There are questions embedded throughout the collection, which includes readings, images, links to outside websites, video, and a podcast.

Essential questions ask:

What are the roots of the practice of yoga?

Who claims to have invented it and what were the original goals?

How did it make its way to the western world and how has it changed through that process?

Tags: Hindu, Hinduism, India, religion, exercise

Kate Harris
13
 

Pangu and the Chinese Creation Story

This student activity teaches students about the Chinese creation story of Pangu and introduces them to other common symbols in ancient Chinese mythology.

Guiding questions include:

-How does this story compare to other creation myths you may know? Are there common elements?

-In what way does this story reflect a distinctly Chinese culture or system of belief?

Tags: Pan gu, Panku, creation, origin, myth, compare contrast, yin yang, Taoism, Daoism, Buddhism, Buddhism, Confucius, Laozi, dragon, qilin, turtle, phoenix, ancient China, religion

Kate Harris
11
 

How Siddhartha Became the Buddha

This collection teaches students about the biography of Siddhartha Guatama and asks them to analyze images depicting stages of his life. Students will also learn about the different mudras, or hand gestures, that the Buddha makes. Quiz questions and hot spots are embedded throughout to check for understanding and support learning.

Tags: Siddhartha, Buddha, Buddhism, reincarnation, religion, India

Kate Harris
12
 

Forensic Anthropology Case: Discovering Jane

Teaching guide introducing a forensic case file from 2012, when Jamestown archaeologists excavated fragments of a human skull and leg bone dating to the winter of 1609-1610. This collection was created with the Anthropology team at the National Museum of Natural History.
(http://anthropology.si.edu/writteninbone/Jane.html )
Steven Hartnett
14
 

3-D Resources from the Smithsonian

This collection provides an introduction to the 3D resources available from the Smithsonian Institution. All of the items in this collection are videos showing 3D models or sharing the process of creating such materials. To explore the models directly in a 3D viewer, download file information, and discover tours and other educator resources, please visit 3d.si.edu.

Models of interest to K-12 teachers might include:

  • Apollo 11 command module
  • Amelia Earhart's flight suit
  • Liang Bua (archaeological site where homo floriensis was discovered)
  • Funerary bust of Haliphat (from Palmyra)
  • Jamestown burial sites and artifacts
  • David Livingstone's gun
  • Porcelain dishes and other home items in the Freer Gallery of Art (from Asian cultures)
  • Killer Whale Hat
  • Whale and dolphin fossils
  • Cosmic Buddha
  • Woolly mammoth skeleton
  • Wright Brothers flyer
  • Gunboat Philadelphia
Kate Harris
19
 

What kind of life did the prehistoric people lived? #Teachinginquiry

This is a hypothetical question I developed for teaching a class in prehistory. The collection is meant to present students with primary and secondary sources that enable them to look closer into the lives of the prehistoric people and compare them with their own. To the above compelling questions, three supporting questions are offered: (1) What things did the prehistoric people used? (2) What kind of food did the prehistoric people eat? and (3) What things were the prehistoric people interested in?


daung teza
9
 

American Indians

Paintings and photographs that represent the Lakota, Inuit, Kwakiutl, Pueblo, and Iroquois tribes. This aligns with Virginia SOL USI.3b. Teachers may have students look critically at each image. Students can then create a claim or hypothesis of what tribe they think it represents, along with supporting details. Teachers should use the "what makes you say that" strategy (described on the first image). This is a great check for understanding or formative assessment of student learning.

Michelle Moses
6
 

Early American Nationalism

Understanding the cultural developments in the newly-formed United States of America

Jeremy Valtairo
19
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Kate Harris
14
 

How We Vote

This collection invites users to explore how Americans have voted throughout our history and the innovations that have improved the voting process. Students will closely investigate images from the 19th and 20th century in order to determine potential flaws and improvements in the democratic process. Links to websites for additional reading are included as well as assessments and a possible extension activity.

Guiding questions:

-How has the process of voting changed in the last two centuries? Consider who, what, when, where, why, and how when answering this question.

-How have technological changes enhanced voting? What challenges remain?

Tags: civics, elections, campaigns, vote, ballot, ballot box, democracy, electoral process, change over time, cause effect

Kate Harris
11
 

Achelous and Hercules: What makes you say that?

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "What makes you say that?," students will examine the 1947 mural "Achelous and Hercules," by Thomas Hart Benton. This artwork explores the relationship between man and water in post-war agricultural America through the retelling of an Ancient Greek myth. Collection includes a video analysis by a museum director and an interactive exploring areas of interest in the artwork.

Tags: greece; agriculture; agricultural; missouri river; marshall plan; truman; cultural connections; midwest

Tess Porter
4
 

Bob Dylan and Woody Guthrie: Teaching Resources

This topical collection gathers resources about Bob Dylan, one of the most influential American music artists of the 20th century, and Woody Guthrie, who greatly influenced the work of Dylan and other folk artists. Ideas for classroom application located in "Notes to Other Users." Resources include images, videos, music, and a lesson plan.

Tags: minnesota; hibbing; folk music; medieval music; ballad

Tess Porter
15
 

Lalibela, Ethiopia: Teaching Resources

This topical collection gathers teaching resources on Lalibela, a UNESCO site in Ethiopia famous for its rock-hewn churches built in the 12th and 13th centuries CE. Christianity was established early in Ethiopia, and orthodox Christianity became the official religion of the Axumite Kingdom in the 4th century CE. Includes a video, a website, objects, and a contemporary painting from the National Museum of African Art.

Tess Porter
11
 

African American Artists and Ancient Greek Myth: Teacher's Guide

This teacher's guide explores how myths transcend time and place through three modern paintings by African American artists, who reinterpret Ancient Greek myth to comment on the human experience. Collection includes three paintings and a lesson plan published by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, which includes background information on myths and artists, as well as activity ideas. Also includes a video about the artist Romare Bearden and his series 'Black Odyssey.' The video details his artistic process, the significance of storytelling in his art, and the lasting importance of 'Black Odyssey.'

Tags: greece

Tess Porter
5
 

Homo floresiensis: Teaching Resources

This topical collection gathers resources related to Homo floresiensis, commonly known as the Flores “Hobbit." H. floresiensis, was discovered in 2003, making it the second most recently discovered early human species. Contains a video, websites, a 3D interactive tour, and articles.

Tess Porter
7
1945-1968 of 2,266 Collections