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Found 2,132 Collections

 

Αλφαβητάρια

A collection of alphabet books to inspire students to create their own. Alphabet books can be created using any subject and completed with any grade. They can be completed individually (one student makes a page for each letter of the alphabet) or as a group or class (each student takes one letter). Here are some ideas for topics or use with your students:
Kindergarden-1st--Pick a letter, write a sentence using that letter and illustrate.
2nd-4th--The class takes a topic such as insects and each student takes a page, researches and illustrates it.
5th-12th--Students take a topic (biography, historical topic, memoir about themselves, book that they've read) and creates an alphabet book with each page telling the story or giving information about the subject.
Met Kous
13
 

Αρχαία παιχνίδια

My first collection of ancient games.
Ourania Doula
7
 

Monologues for the (out)WIN!

All images are from The Outwin 2016 finalists collection.

Students should study the portraits, with the only shared information the title of the work, using the Claim-Support-Question Strategy. Each student will make several claims about their assigned image, and support those claims through their own created character. They will use the questions that they come up with as a jumping-off point for character creation. Each fully-realized character should come from the world of the portrait, have a distinct stance and walk, and be able to answer questions presented in an improvised manner.
Katie McCreary
20
 

Civil Rights (8th Grade)

#ISTE2016
Jaclyn Maldonado
6
 

Historical Hawaii

#iste2016
Laurel Michelle Galway
5
 

TMS Mount Rushmore

Each year in May, the TMS 6th Grade makes a trip to the Custer, SD area. As we travel through the area, a part of our time is a visit to Mount Rushmore. I am always looking for new 6th grade appropriate resources on the site. #ISTE2016 #smithsonianlab
Dave Burrill
3
 

Inca

#ISTE2016
Mary-Pat Hulse
6
 

History of Video Games

A look at the factors that influenced video games and gaming.
John Di Maria
18
 

What makes you say that?: Marian Anderson in Concert at the Lincoln Memorial

This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine for interpretation with justification. This routine helps students describe what they see or know and asks them to build explanations. The strategy is paired with photographs and an artwork from the National Museum of American History and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Using guided questions, students will look at a single event through multiple media formats.

Tags: William H. Johnson, Robert Scurlock, Marian Anderson, Easter 1939 concert, Lincoln Memorial
Melinda Welch
5
 

What makes you say that?: Marian Anderson in Concert at the Lincoln Memorial by Ashley Naranjo

This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine for interpretation with justification. This routine helps students describe what they see or know and asks them to build explanations. The strategy is paired with photographs and an artwork from the National Museum of American History and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Using guided questions, students will look at a single event through multiple media formats.

Tags: William H. Johnson, Robert Scurlock, Marian Anderson, Easter 1939 concert, Lincoln Memorial
Susan Stokley
4
 

Breakfast in space

Space Breakfast
Bre Griego
6
 

Space Lunch

Nutritious lunch while traveling to Tattooine...
Larry Linson
6
 

Writing Inspiration: Using Art to Spark Narrative Story Elements

The Smithsonian museum collection inspires many to research the history behind artifacts, but this collection explores the use of art and artifacts to spark creative story writing. Students will choose artifacts to craft characters, a setting, and a plot conflict to create and write a narrative story.

Targeted Vocabulary: Narrative, protagonist , antagonist, character, character traits, setting, plot, climax, and conflict.

After reading and analyzing several narrative stories for story elements such as character, setting, plot, climax, and conflict, students will use this collection to begin planning their own narrative stories.
Individuals or partners will first view the portraits and discuss possible stories behind each face before choosing a protagonist, antagonist, and supporting characters. They may begin to discuss and imagine character traits for each subject.
Next, the student will select a landscape setting in which the story may take place. The writer will describe the landscape, imagine a time period, and name the location.
Finally, the student will either choose an action artifact around which to build a major plot event, or have that slide as a minor scene in their story.
Students may use the Question Formulation Technique to garner ideas for background stories behind the faces. http://rightquestion.org/
Once the story elements are in place, the students may begin to draft narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

With the artifacts selected as the major story elements, the students may begin crafting their narrative story. The artifacts can then be displayed as illustrations in the published narratives.
Susan Stokley
66
 

Nevada

Images of Nevada and the Sierra Nevada.
Rosalind Bucy
5
 

Inventions: The washing machine

This collection follows the development of the washing machine through time.
Chris Campbell
7
 

Reading Companion: Hot-Air Balloons and the Civil War

In this collection, students will explore the Union Army's use of hot-air balloons during the Civil War. Two articles - "Professor Lowe's Adventure" [Cobblestone; Nov/Dec 2015] and "Civil War Air Force" [Cricket; Oct 2015] - serve as an introduction to Thaddeus S.C. Lowe, an aeronaut, and his influence in the creation of the US's first air force. Additional resources, such as photographs of the balloons, letters written from the Secretary of the Smithsonian to Lowe prior to his involvement in the Union Army, the remnants of a Confederate balloon, and more, help situate these articles into a larger, historical context. Suggestions for use located in "Notes to Other Users."

Uses the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "Think Puzzle Explore." This routine sets the stage for deeper inquiry.
Tess Porter
19
 

Japanese-American Internment

The resources in this collection depict what life was like for Japanese-Americans living in internment camps during WWII. Student may examine these resources as they address the following questions:

Why were Japanese-Americans moved into internment camps during WWII?
Do you agree with the government's argument that it was necessary for national security?
Did the government violate the rights of American citizens?
Do the events of and surrounding Japanese interment have relevance in America today?
Linda Muller
20
 

How Did Artists View the Civil War? A Collection using a Visible Thinking Strategy

This collection uses a visible thinking strategy called "See-Think-Wonder" from Harvard's Project Zero to help students analyze a Civil-War era sketch to determine context and perspective. After completing the routine, students will learn more about the image and the artist who made it, as well as view art representing a very different point of view.

For more on this strategy, see the "Notes to Other Users."
Kate Harris
8
 

Holocaust and Art

The artworks in this collection do not necessarily directly reference the Nazi genocide of Jews and other targeted groups. These sculptures, paintings, and photographs date from roughly 1933 onward, and represent a reflection on untimely death (collectively and individually) or a foreboding of turmoil and destruction. Art is one way to begin to comprehend the misery that human beings sometimes inflict upon one another. We cannot completely grasp the impact of that loss and grief; yet images may touch us on a deeper level, and ultimately serve to reinforce a sense of the value of human life and the reality of our shared humanity.
Ken Jassie
10
 

Insects in Embroidery

Embroidered objects featuring images of insects.
Megan Lucy
27
 

Trail of Tears

What was the Trail of Tears? What incidents led to the Trail of Tears? Who was removed from their native land? Where did they resettle? What was President Andrew Jackson's opinion on Indian removal? What was John Ross's opinion on Indian removal? What is your opinion on the event?

This Collection was created to be used as an introduction to the "Trail of Tears" event that occurred during the period of Westward Expansion. This Collection contains images of then President Andrew Jackson, John Ross, Chief of the Cherokee nation, and General Winfield Scott. It also includes Jackson's message to Congress, "On Indian Removal", the Treaty of New Echota along with a letter that Chief Ross wrote to the U.S. Congress denouncing the Treaty of New Echota which the government used as legal authority to remove the Cherokee from their native land.

Background Information:
In 1838 and 1839, President Andrew Jackson ordered the relocation of the Cherokee people from their native lands east of the Mississippi River to an area in what is known as present-day Oklahoma.
The Cherokee people called this forced migration the, "Trail of Tears" because of its devastating effects. The Cherokee people suffered hunger, disease, and exhaustion during their journey, resulting in 4,000 deaths out of the 15,000 Cherokees who were forced to relocate.

Source citation: "Trail of Tears." Africans in America. PBS Online. nd. Web. 7 Jan 2016.
Linda Muller
11
 

Famous Faces: A collection of portraits by Irving Penn

Irving Penn was one of the most influential photographers of the 20th Century. Throughout a career that spanned 70 years, Penn captured images in black and white and color across various genres including advertising, fashion, still life, and portraits.
This Collection features portraits Penn took of famous people who built careers in the arts, an article written about Penn in The Smithsonian Magazine (November, 2015), and a link to the Irving Penn Archives at the Art Institute of Chicago where Penn donated the bulk of his collection in 1995.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Resources in the Irving Penn Archives collections at the Art Institute of Chicago include a series of nude photographs which may be inappropriate for minors to view.
Linda Muller
24
 

Captains of Industry

This Collection features images of men who became, "Captains of Industry" in America during the 19th Century.
Some of these men you may be able to identify immediately and others you may not. Your challenge is to write 5-7 sentence about each man. Identify the industry to which each man is associated, the dates of his reign, net worth, and other interesting details.
Lesson variation: Discuss the term, "robber baron" with students and why or why not that term applies to each man pictured in this Collection.
Lesson extension: Have students identify 10 "Captains of Industry" in America today - Who are they? To which industry are they associates? What is their net worth? Are they considered to be modern-day robber barons? Why or why not?
Linda Muller
14
 

Spanish-American War

The Spanish-American War was a conflict between the United States and Spain that ended Spanish colonial rule in the Americas and resulted in U.S. acquisitions of territories in the Pacific and Latin America.

The war originated with the Cuban struggle for independence from Spain in 1895. Demand for U.S. intervention increased after the unexplained sinking of the U.S.S. Maine on February 16, 1898 in Havana Harbour.

The U.S. declared war on Spain in April, 1898 and attacked Spain's interests in the Pacific and Cuba. Realizing that she was outclassed by American military power, Spain surrendered from Cuba in July, 1898 - effectively ending the war. Later that year, in December, 1898, Spain signed the Treaty of Paris in which they renounced their claims to Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Guam and transferred sovereignty over the Philippines to the U.S. for $20 million.

Source citation: "Spanish-American War." History.com. A&E Networks. 2016. Web. 6 Jan 2016
Linda Muller
17
1945-1968 of 2,132 Collections