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Oral history interview with Ruth Gikow, 1964

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 1 sound tape reel ; 7 in. Transcript: 29 p. An interview of Ruth Gikow conducted by Harlan Phillips in 1964 for the Archives of American Art.
Gikow speaks of being born in Russia; mural painting at the Bronx Hospital for the Federal Art Project; interest in graphics; the Artists Congress; the Index of American Design; and her thoughts on contemporary painting. She recalls John Stuart Curry and Gene Morey.

Oral history interview with Richard Stankiewicz, 1963

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 24 pages.

An interview of Richard Stankiewicz conducted by Richard Brown Baker in 1963 for the Archives of American Art, regarding the Hansa Gallery.

Oral history interview with Julius Davidson, 1964

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 66 pages

An interview of Julius Davidson conducted by Harlan Phillips in 1964 for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Richard Bellamy, 1963

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 70 pages An interview of Richard Bellamy, concerning the Hansa Gallery, conducted 1963, by Richard Brown Baker, for the Archives of American Art.
Bellamy speaks of the Hansa Gallery's original organization by a group of Hans Hofmann's students; Hansa's location, purpose and program; and the definition of a cooperative gallery. Bellamy reminisces about his early life in Cincinnati, the influence of the Provincetown exhibition in 1949, becoming manager and director of Hansa Gallery and the gallery's move uptown. He discusses financial arrangements with artists, guest exhibitions, collectors, the gallery's location and its disadvantages in regard to visitors and critics, an Allan Kaprow exhibition, and the inclusion of Hansa artists in the Whitney Museum of American Art's annuals and other exhibitions.
He comments on Hansa's reputation, ART NEWS notices, comparisons of the Hansa and Green galleries, the weaknesses of a cooperative gallery, the search for new artists, financial problems, reasons for closing the gallery, galleries where original Hansa artists now exhibit and the gallery's importance in the art life of the times. He recalls John Gruen, Richard Stankiewicz, Miles Forst, Jan Muller, Myron Stout, and Thomas Hess.

Oral history interview with Rebecca Reis, 1980

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 123 pages An interview of Rebecca Reis conducted in 1980, by William McNaught, for the Archives of American Art's Mark Rothko and His Times oral history project.
Reis speaks of her life in New York City. At their home in the city they entertained artists, art dealers, and other art lovers and had a great desire to provide a haven for people who loved art. Reis recalls many stories of the people they met and supported including Jacques Lipchitz, George Grosz, Jackson Pollock, Peggy Guggenheim, Max Ernst, Marc Chagall, Larry Rivers, Philip Guston, Robert Motherwell, Helen Frankenthaler, William Baziotes, Franz Kline, Adolph Gottlieb, and Mark Rothko, the legal case involving Rothko's estate, and Rothko's relationship with Rita Reinhardt. They were particular friends of Peggy Guggenheim. Bernard Reis gave financial advice to many people in the art world. The latter portion of the interviews concentrates on their great friend, Mark Rothko, his suicide, and subsequent court case brought by the family.

Oral history interview with Helen Frankenthaler, 1968

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 1 sound tape reel ; 7 in. Transcript: 41 p. An interview of Helen Frankenthaler conducted 1968, by Barbara Rose, for the Archives of American Art.
Frankenthaler speaks of studying art at Bennington College with Paul Feeley; the influence of Picasso and Kandinsky on her work; Clement Greenberg and his relationship with Frankenthaler and other artists; studying with Hans Hofmann and Rufino Tamayo; her childhood; meeting Robert Motherwell; the New York School; and Jackson Pollock, his paintings, technique, and influence on her. She also describes her technique, painting on the floor, titles, and color versus drawing. Frankenthaler recalls Grace Hartigan, Friedel Dzubas, Willem de Kooning, and others.

Oral history interview with Pietro Lazzari, 1964

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 77 p.

An interview of Pietro Lazzari conducted in 1964, by Harlan Phillips, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Paul Burlin, 1962

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 5 sound files (2 hr., 39 min.) digital, wav Transcript: 65 pages Interview of Paul Burlin, conducted on December 5-6, 1962, by Dorothy Gees Seckler, for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Burlin speaks of his childhood education in England; working for the magazine Delineator; his education at the National Academy of Design; his travels in the American Southwest; his early exhibitions in New York; his first wife's writings on folk music; visiting Europe before the first World War; discovering Cubism and Fauvism; working on the WPA under the Whitney Museum; joining and then leaving the American Artists' Congress in protest; his thoughts on overtly political art; exhibiting at the Downtown Gallery; his image-making process; and his critique of Pop art. Burlin also recalls James Huneker, Franz Boas, Albert Gleizes, Henri Matisse, Edith Halpert, Georgia O'Keeffe, and others.

Minoru Yamasaki interview, [ca. 1959 Aug.]

Archives of American Art
Sound recording, duplicate: 2 compact discs 4 3/4 in. Sound recording, master: 1 sound tape reel; 7 in. Transcript: 33 p. An interview with Minoru Yamasaki conducted by Virginia Harriman.
Yamasaki discusses his philosophy of architecture; his belief that architecture should be based on human experience; and his design of the Detroit Institute of Arts. Using architectural models present at the interview, Yamasaki discusses several of his architectural projects, including the Conservatory of Music for Oberlin College; the Michigan Consolidated Gas Company, it being the first high building built in Detroit in some years, building to convey a sense of upwardness; World Agricultural Fair for India (temporary) opening December 11, 1959, participating with other countries, Trade Fair Building, exhibit entitled "Mala U.S.A." [Mala means fair in Indian], showing a series of different experiences at a country fair; St. Louis Air Terminal; Benjamin Franklin Junior High School; Wayne Education Building; McGregor Building; Daran Air Terminal (Arabia); trying to be consistent in buildings; Gothic arch; learning from the past about qualities one seeks in architecture; being true to technology; Japanese architecture; serene buildings; machine-made buildings; and limiting himself to public buildings.

Interview with Judithe Hernandez, 1998 Mar. 28

Archives of American Art
2 sound cassettes (145 min.) : analog Transcript: 74 pages. An interview of Judithe Hernandez conducted in Chicago, Ill., 1998 Mar. 28, by Jeffrey Rangel.
Hernandez discusses her family background and encouragement to become professional; training at Otis Art Institute and admiration there for African-American teacher Charles White; the intellectual influence of Carlos Almarazs father on her as well as him, artists in L.A. such as Magu and Patssi Valdez; working with Judy Baca on the Great Wall of Los Angeles project; description and characterization of members of Los Four and sexism in the work of some Chicano male artists; her disillusionment over the reception of Chicano art and her own work in particular, the fact that she was not included in the big Hispanic Art in the United States: Thirty Contemporary Painters and Sculptors exhibition and catalogue; becoming an educator; and the debate with Shifra Goldman.

Color Decoded: Richard Landis Extended Interview

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
Image of Richard Landis pointing at his weavingsExtended interview with Richard Landis was recorded in January, 2018, in his home studio in Prescott, Arizona.

Welsh Folk Songs: Interview with Meredydd Evans

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
In this interview, Welsh historian and Folk Musician, Meredydd Evans speaks about his childhood, his relationship with Moses Aschs,  and his 1954 landmark album Welsh Folk Songs.

Blackfoot Auntie Wetzel Interview [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Conversations with the interviewees and Wetzel telling bear stories

Oral history interview with Peter Agostini, 1968

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 99 pages. An interview of Peter Agostini conducted in 1968, by Colette Roberts, for the Archives of American Art at 151 Avenue B, New York, New York.
Mr. Agostini speaks of his childhood spent living throughout the five boroughs of New York; his interactions with clients of his father's acting employment agency; his early education in Catholic school and the creative freedom allotted by the nuns; his first feelings of isolation as an artist at the age of seven; the development of a sense of communication as the result of the loss of his mother at the age of three and time spent at a school for orphans; his early realization and vision of artistic destiny; his religious interests which lead to mysticism in his earlier work; his time spent working freely in the DaVinci Studio with Spaventa; the discovery by Hess of his works in Gallerie Grimaud; his attainment of the Longview Grant; his working experience throughout the Depression as part of the WPA casting plaster mannequins while working indirectly with Pollack as well as Marca Relli; his subsequent move to designing department store windows (use of Mondrian-like forms and lines); his feelings of his position as an observer; the importance of communication through art (communication without words); his rejection of the Abstract Expressionist group and choice of independence; the influence of the sculpture of Kolbe and Bache in the thirties; Clement Greenberg's distaste for his work; his feelings about the relative failure to sell his work due its unusual edginess and mystery; his role in the introduction of the work of contemporary European artists (Chausserian, Gauthier, Modrian) to the American group; his description of his own work as "traditionless"; his feelings of self-importance as one of the most original sculptors in the art world; his influence on the younger generation, particularly Marisol; the enslavement to originality that the younger generation faces; his attitudes towards American Art forms and their lack of rebellious spirit; the virtues of the American writers, such as Poe, Whitman, and Melville as American "knapsack" writers; his personal technique which places an emphasis on the "skin" or volume of something; his attempt to create quiet art, or art that merely indicates features; his frustration with teaching and the problems of regurgitated knowledge; the role of Meyer Shapiro in his teaching career at Columbia; the formation of the Club and its similarity to the Cubist's café scene; his opinions on the relationship of sex and sensuality in American art; his personal struggles, including the loss of his second wife and two of his brothers, in addition to the estrangement of his only daughter by his first wife; his feelings on the role of psycho analysis and personal history in a work of art; his present works which feature the "swell." For the majority of the second half of the interview Ms. Roberts asks Mr. Agostini to express his opinions on the work of: Kline; DeKooning; Duchamp; Oldenburg; La Tour; DeChirico; Maillol; Pompon; Rothko; Chardin; Cezanne; Giacometti; Reinhardt; Chryssa; Tony Smith; Segal; Lachaise; Zorach; Manship; Flannagan; Kelly; Lassaw; David Smith; Hare; Lipton; Ferber; Lippold; Roszak; Nakian; Noguchi; Hague; Kohn; di Suvero; Chamberlain; Kaprow; Sugarman; Stankiewicz; Bontecou; Scarpitta; Cornell; Keinholz; Rivera; Judd; Robert Morris; O'Keeffe; Samaras; Mark Tobey; Marin; Pollock; Hartley; Dove; Macdonald-Wright; Demuth; Sheeler; Hopper; Mirot; Matisse; DuBuffet.

Author Interview: Thrity Umrigar [in Bloom]

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
I was bad. I couldn’t keep up with my chaotic new year and kept missing deadlines. Thrity Umrigar got so...

Robert Houston Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.5.1a and 2016.129.5.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

132.40872 GB

Robert Houston was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Mr. Houston donated a collection of his photographs to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this interview, Robert Houston discusses his life and his journey to become a photographer. His story includes references to Gordon Parks and his unconventional methods of getting close enough to take shots of celebrities and entertainers.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Maureen Yancey Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.14.1a and 2016.129.14.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

92.31944 GB

Maureen Yancey was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Ms. Yancey donated her son, J. Dilla's equipment, including a MOOG and MPG that are featured in our Musical Crossroads exhibit, to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this oral history interview Maureen Yancey talks about her son, J Dilla's, life and work and why she decided to donate his equipment to the museum.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Kenneth Royster Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.4.1a and 2016.129.4.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

166.46723 GB

Ken Royster was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Mr. Royster donated a collection of his photographs to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

During this oral history interview Ken Royster discusses his evolution as an artist and photographer and his approach to his work. Royster is known for his black and white photography of African American cultural rituals, such as baptisms. He also talks at length about growing up in Baltimore, Maryland.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

DaWayne Brashear Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.12.1a and 2016.129.12.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

144.75604 GB

DaWayne Brashear was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Mr. Brashear donated several items related Carl Brashear’s career in the Navy, including his prosthetic leg, to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this oral history DaWayne Brashear recounts his memories of growing up with his father, Chief Master Carl Brashear. His narrative includes descriptions of his father’s work as well as insightful details about their family life while their father doggedly pursued a career as a Master Diver in the face of discrimination, and even after he lost his leg.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Amirah Muhammad Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.7.1a and 2016.129.7.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

89.37764 GB

Amirah Muhammad was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Ms. Muhammad donated a platinum pendant that was commissioned by Elijah Muhammad for Clara Muhammad to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this oral history Amirah Muhammad, granddaughter of Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad and Clara Muhammad, discusses the dynamics of growing up in the Nation of Islam, including memories of Malcolm X and Muhammad Ali.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Ann Jimerson Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.9.1a and 2016.129.9.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

55.06189 GB

Ann Jimerson was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Ms. Jimerson donated shards of glass from the 16th St. Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama to the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Her family had kept them as a reminder of their commitment to Civil Rights.

In this oral history interview Ann Jimerson recounts moving from the North to Birmingham, Alabama in the 1960s. She discusses her memories of what it was like to be a white child from up North in a liberal family, during the tumultuous years of the Civil Rights movement in Birmingham.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Author Interview: Ava Chin [in Bloom]

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
Thanksgiving approach-eth! Don’t you want to know what will be on the Urban Forager’s table? Read on! Ava Chin, author...

Author Interview: Ellen Oh [in Bloom]

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
Ellen Oh, author of the acclaimed Prophecy trilogy – starring a third-century, yellow-eyed, teenage supergirl demon slayer – is channeling her own...

Interview of Sister Marie Inez Hilger [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Side A: Interview of Inez Hilger by her niece, Mary K. Zirbes, concerning Inez' early life and her entrance into the Catholic University of America. Side B. Sister Inez Hilger interviews Elizabeth G. Wetzel.
169-192 of 6,676 Resources