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Oral history interview with Carlyle H. Smith, 1994 August 8

Archives of American Art
2 sound cassettes (1 hr., 46 min.) : analog.

Transcript: 59 pages.

An interview with Carlyle H. Smith conducted 1994 August 8, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.

Smith discusses his childhood in Torrington, Connecticut, his early interest in jewelry design, education at the Rhode Island School of Design in jewelry making and silversmithing, and teaching at the Rhode Island College of Education. He recalls working in the metal craft shop of Augustus Rose on jewelry design and repair, and studying with English master silversmith, William Bennett, at his workshop in 1947. Smith speaks of teaching metal arts in the Providence, R.I., public schools and setting up the first American university-level metal arts curriculum at the University of Kansas, 1947-1977. He describes his liberal approach to teaching by setting general assignments and working alongside students. He comments on his work, 1930-1993.

Art for the record : issues of Documentation and Contemporary Art : Panel discussion, 1988 March 26

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: sound files : digital, wav file

A panel discussion sponsored by the Southern California Committee for Contemporary Art Documentation.

The participants speak of the relationship between documentation and contemporary art.

The participants are: Stella Paul, Sheldon Nodelman, Henry Hopkins, Helen Mayer Harrison, Newton Harrison, David Brauer, Herschel Browning Chipp, Murney Gerlach, Derek Boshier, Nancy Holt, and Paul Karlstrom. The event is hosted by the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Evelyn Statsinger, 2015 May 11-13

Archives of American Art
Sound recording, master: 3 sound files (3 hr., 31 min.) digital, wav

Transcript: 106 pages.

An interview with Evelyn Statsinger, conducted 2015 May 11-13, by Lanny Silverman, for the Archives of American Art's Chicago Art and Artists: Oral History Project, at Statsinger's studio in Chicago, Illinois.

Statsinger speaks of studying at the High School of Museum and Arts in New York, the Art Students League, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago; showing at Chicago galleries, including Frumkin, Artemisia, Kovler, and Jan Cicero; how her work fits in with contemporary Chicago artists, including Monster Roster and Imagists; the use of ambiguity in her work; how her travels in Japan and Mexico influenced her style; Japanese theater; and contemporary art and popular culture. Statsinger also recalls Ossip Zadkine, Katherine Kuh, Carl Schniewind, Mies van der Rohe, Leon Golub, Kathleen Blackshear, and others.

Oral history interview with Robert Vázquez-Pacheco, 2017 December 16-17

Archives of American Art
Audio: 8 sound files (6 hr., 59 min.) digital, wav

Transcript: 131 pages

An interview with Robert Vázquez-Pacheco conducted 2017 December 16 and 17, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at The New School, in New York, New York.

Vazquez-Pacheco speaks of his childhood in South Bronx housing projects; members and dynamics of his family growing up; experiences and discourses of religion, race, gender, sexuality, reading, and the arts as a child and adolescent; attending SUNY Oswego for one year; an existentially pivotal year in Miami in 1975; returning to New York in 1976, immersing himself in Latino gay culture, and being exposed to white gay culture; living in Hempstead, New York for two years with a boyfriend, and beginning to paint again; working at Chase Manhattan Bank and volunteering for the Gay Switchboard in New York City in the late '70s; the beginning of the AIDS epidemic; caring for his boyfriend, Jeff, who died of AIDS in 1986; the particular experience and effect of HIV on communities of color and low-income communities; mounting societal homophobia during the epidemic; leading Gay Circles, a gay men's consciousness-raising group, in the late '80s; his involvement in ACT UP, and burgeoning political consciousness, after Jeff's death; activism as a creative outlet; working at different times with the People With AIDS health group, the Anti-Violence Project, the Minority AIDS Taskforce, Latino Gay Men of New York, Minority AIDS Coalition in Philadelphia, and LLEGO in Washington; AIDS activism's failure to think intersectionally and build coalitions; his involvement in Gran Fury; becoming a more prolific writer, and getting involved with Other Countries, in the early '90s; Gran Fury's 2011 retrospective; the need for racial diversity and representation in activism and the art world; white flight from AIDS activism following the arrival of protease inhibitors; personal frustrations with the current AIDS activism discourse and nonprofit organizational complex, and the general cultural conversation about HIV/AIDS; contrasting representations of AIDS activism in How to Survive a Plague and BPM; and the essential role of art in AIDS activism. Vazquez-Pacheco also recalls Mark Simpson, Craig Metroka, David Kirschenbaum, Maxine Wolfe, Avram Finkelstein, Deb Levine, Charles King, Robert Garcia, Ortez Alderson, Derek Hodel, Gregg Bordowitz, Michael Callen, Carl George, Joey Walsh, Matt Foreman, Vito Russo, Larry Kramer, Tom Kalin, Marlene McCarty, Charles Rice-González, George Ayala, Essex Hemphill, Manolo Guzmán, Donald Moffett, Cladd Stevens, Richard Elovich, Loring McAlpin, Michael Nesline, Peter Staley, David France, Andrew Miller, and others.

Oral history interview with Esteban Vicente, 1982 November 27-December 4

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 79 pages

An interview of Esteban Vicente conducted 1982 November 27-1982 December 4, by Elizabeth Frank, for the Archives of American Art.

Miwok Sound Recording DEC 1940

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:Jpm List:JPH Lr 09 Jan 1941

Aluminum disc

Kiriwinian #12 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Chumash Sound Recording 23 JUL 1936

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

SC WN

Disc Note:Aeh List

SEE CHU CT9 CHU CT7, 21 MINS:CHU CT8, 21 MINS:CHU CT9, 3 MINS, 7.50 IPS, NARS CHU CT9, 3 MINS, 7.50IPS, NARS

Aluminum disc

Oral history interview with Harold James Brennan, 1979 Sept. 5 and 1982 Feb. 16

Archives of American Art
3 sound files : digital, wav file

Transcript: 36 pages

An interview with Harold J. Brennan conducted 1979 Sept. 5 and 1982 Feb. 16, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.

Brennan discusses his architectural and art historical training at Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University) and at Harvard University in the 1930s; his artistic training in metalwork; the highlights of his career; and his role in the development of the School for American Craftsmen. He mentions Louis C. Tiffany and Frederick Clayter.

Oral history interview with Nicolas Calas, 1977 December 12-1978 January 26

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 2 sound tape reels ; 5 in.

Transcript: 115 pages

An interview of Nicolas Calas conducted 1977 December 12-1978 January 26, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Robert Powell Coggins, 1985 September 26

Archives of American Art
2 sound files : digital, wav file

Transcript: 16 pages

An interview with Robert Powell Coggins conducted 1985 September 26, by Liza Kirwin, for the Archives of American Art.

Coggins speaks of his family and educational background; growing up in Marietta, Georgia; his first purchase of English portraits and Dutch still lifes; his decision to concentrate on collecting Southern American art; his interest in various southern painters including Willie M. Chambers, Nell Choate Jones, Elliott Daingerfield, and Thomas Addison Richards; efforts to refine and expand the collection by acquiring art that captures the "tranquil, slow, relaxed politeness of the true South"; and his continuing struggle to be accepted by art historians and museum officials.

Oral history interview with Frederick James Cummings, 1982 July 22

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 29 pages

An interview of Frederick Cummings conducted 1982 July 22, by Dennis Barrie, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Kenneth Donahue, 1981 March 18-April 17

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 71 pages

An interview of Kenneth Donahue conducted 1981 March18-April 17, by Ruth Bowman, for the Archives of American Art.

Donahue speaks of his early interest in museums; his education at the University of Louisville; his work at the Museum of Modern Art, the Frick and Ringling Museums, and as assistant director at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; some exhibitions and acquisitions by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Oral history interview with Robert Ebendorf, 2004 April 16-18

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 96 pages

An interview of Robert Ebendorf conducted 2004 April 16-18, by Tacey Rosolowski, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Greenville, N.C.

Ebendorf speaks of growing up in Topeka, Kansas; spending time in his grandparents' tailor shop; his relationship with his parents; having difficulties in school; making jewelry in arts and crafts class; meeting Carlyle Smith and deciding to study art at the University of Kansas; staying at the University of Kansas to get his MFA in Three-Dimensional Design; taking part in important early exhibitions including the "Wichita National"; collaging in his artwork and letters; how his art professors including, Robert Montgomery, mentored him; studying metal craft in Norway on a Fulbright; getting a job teaching at Stetson University; returning to Norway on a Tiffany Grant and working in a goldsmith shop; rebuilding the metals program at the University of Georgia; traveling to Norway once again and designing for the David Anderson Firm; experimenting with mixed media and found objects in his work; exhibiting at the Susan Cummins Gallery; hunting for objects with his daughter Brittany; teaching at SUNY New Paltz; using the ColorCore material; expressing both the masculine and feminine in his art; and making crafts with his mother.

Ebendorf also speaks of his current daily routine and the importance of a home studio; the influence of Scandinavian art on his work, especially the art of Claus Bury; doing work on commission; teaching at Penland School of Crafts and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts; taking part in the founding of the Society of North American Goldsmiths and serving as President; teaching at East Carolina University; preparing students for a career in metalsmithing; the changing trends in American and European jewelry; organizing the "Conversations" series of workshops at SUNY New Paltz; reading various art publications and the need for more critical writing about craft; selling work at craft fairs; the challenges of working with various galleries and museums; the importance of his work Lost Souls and Found Spirits; his recent retrospective "The Jewelry of Robert Ebendorf: A Retrospective of Forty Years;" and his current work and plans for the future. Ebendorf also recalls Kurt Matzdorf, Fred Woell, Bill Brown, Philip Morton, Ronald Pearson, L. Brent Kington, Linda Darty, Jamie Bennett, Earl Krentzin, and others.

Oral history interview with Rafael Ferrer, 1990 Sept. 19

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 4 sound cassettes

Transcript: 157 p.

An interview of Rafael Ferrer conducted 1990 Sept. 19, by Cynthia Veloric, for the Archives of American Art Philadelphia Project.

Ferrer speaks about his childhood in Puerto Rico; his education in Catholic school and military school; his interest in music including his professional work as a drummer in Latin jazz bands both in Puerto Rico and New York City; studies at Syracuse University and the University of Puerto Rico; his interest in painting; meeting the surrealist Eugenio Granell and Granell's influence, including Ferrer's involvement in the 1950's with surrealists in Puerto Rico and Europe, and a discussion of his feelings on Dada and surrealism; the shift toward conceptual and process art in the 1960's; moving to Philadelphia in the 1960's, teaching at the Philadelphia College of Art (now the University of the Arts) and exhibiting at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; installations and exhibits in New York City in the late 1960's and 1970's, including his twenty year association with the Nancy Hoffman Gallery; the deflected fountain piece at the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the transition to handmade art works and then to painting and figurative works partially inspired by Alex Katz; collectors Sydney and Frances Lewis; and several commissions.

Oral history interview with Richard E. Filipowski, 1989 Sept. 25-1990 Mar. 14

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 143 pages.

An interview of Richard E. Filipowski conducted 1989 Sept. 25-1990 Mar. 14, by Robert Brown for the Archives of American Art. Filipowski discusses his early childhood in Poland; immigration and childhood in Ontario, Canada; attending the Chicago School of Design (formerly New Bauhaus) under Laszlo Moholy-Nagy; freelance work in Chicago; teaching at the School of Design, at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, and at MIT; his sculpture; and associations with Walter Gropius, Joseph Hudnut, Robert Preusser, Lawrence Anderson, Gyorgy Kepes, and Pietro Belluschi.

Oral history interview with George Goodspeed, 1987 Apr. 24-June 3

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 4 sound files : digital, wav file

Transcript: 45 pages

An interview with George Goodspeed conducted 1987 Apr. 24-1987 June 3, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.

Goodspeed speaks of his business from the 1920s through to the present as a rare book, manuscript and print dealer; the antiquarian and topical (as opposed to aesthetic) emphasis of Goodspeed's print department; important clients; trends in taste; the market for prints.

Oral history interview with Lee Hoffman, 1977 June 1-15

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 4 sound tape reels ; 5 in.

Transcript: 122 p.

Interviews of Lee Hoffman conducted 1977 June 1-15, by Linda Abramsky, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Vladimir Kagan, 2010 June 10-11

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 120 pages.

An interview of Vladimir Kagan conducted 2010 June 10-11, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Kagan's studio in Nantucket, Connecticut.

Oral history interview with Robert Kidd, 1981 July 13

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 1 sound cassette

Transcript: 47 p.

An interview of Robert Kidd conducted 1981 July 13, by Jean O'Korn, for the Archives of American Art.

Kidd speaks of his family and educational background, student life and his teaching position at the Cranbrook Academy of Art, his influences, his techniques, his philosophy of work and his future plans.

Oral history interview with Wendy Maruyama, 2010 March 5-6

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 80 pages.

An interview of Wendy Maruyama conducted 2010 March 5 and 6, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Maruyama's home and studio, in San Diego, California.

Oral history interview with Henry Mattson, 1964 Nov. 4

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 9 p.

An interview of Henry Mattson conducted 1964 Nov. 4, by Joseph Trovato, for the Archives of American Art.

Mattson discusses how he came to be a painter, his career as an artist, and his thoughts on painting.

Oral history interview with Anna Valentina Murch, 2010 May 21-22

Archives of American Art
Sound recording, master: 7 memory cards (5 hr., 24 min.) secure digital; 1.25 in.

Transcript: 121 pages.

An interview of Anna Valentina Murch conducted 2002 May 21-22, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's U.S. General Services Administration, Design Excellence and the Arts oral history project, at Murch's studio, at Project Artaud, Mills College, and at her home in San Francisco, Calif.
169-192 of 2,732 Resources