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Found 7,569 Resources

Fox Skin Robe

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
FROM CARD: "ON EXHIBIT, HALL 11 (9/77). INVENTORIED 1977."

Fox-Chin Charm

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
From card: "Skin with brown hair from beneath the lower jaw of a "silver fox" folded over, red and white beads on edge, with red and purple thread tassels."

Ivory Carving (Fox?)

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Fox Trap Model

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Carving, White Fox

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
FROM CARD: "INSET EYES, GROOVE DOWN BELLY. INVENTORIED 1979."

Fox Head Pouch

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Toy Fox - Carving

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Fox Skin Quiver

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
Quiver has fur on.

Ivory Carving, Fox

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Fox Trap Model

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Fox Trap Model

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Carving, White Fox

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
FROM CARD: "INSET EYES, GROOVE DOWN BELLY. INVENTORIED 1979."

Ivory Carving, Fox

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
FROM CARD: "INVENTORIED 1978."

Fox Trap Model

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Miss Sylvia Fox

National Museum of American History
Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. (1862–1932) used a wide variety of printing processes, printing out some negatives in more than one medium. In his lectures, he pointed out that this approach to photography was important because in the hands of a photographer who “lives and understands the infinitely varied moods of nature, photography can be made to express and interpret them.” In correspondence with Dr. Olmstead at the Smithsonian, as the presentation of his gifts and bequest to the museum was being arranged, Eickemeyer wrote: “The collection illustrates the use of every important process and will, I believe, be of real educational value.”

The first of the Eickemeyer photographic collection came to the National Museum’s Department of Arts and Industries (the “Castle”), Division of Graphic Arts in 1922 at the close of a large exhibition of Eickemeyer’s work at the Anderson Gallery in New York. It was a gift from the photographer of five framed prints from the New York show that he considered representative of his work.

In 1929, Eickemeyer gave the Smithsonian 83 framed prints (including copies of the prints that he had previously given the museum), 15 portfolios, his medals and awards, and several miscellaneous photographic paraphernalia. In 1930, he made a will bequeathing most of his remaining prints, negatives, photographic equipment and other objects relating to his 30-year career as a photographer to the Smithsonian Institution.

Upon Eickemeyer’s death in 1932, an accession consisting primarily of photographic equipment from his studio came to the Smithsonian. Included in the bequest were 2 cameras, several lenses, scales, timers, printing frames, plate holders, dry mounters and a lecture case with slide projector and hand-colored lantern slides. Also included were 43 albums, journals and portfolios and assorted negatives and contact prints, many marked “discards.” There are 58 albums, notebooks and portfolios in the collection. Eickemeyer requested in his will that his gifts and bequests be called The Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. Collection.

Miss Sylvia Fox

National Museum of American History
Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. (1862–1932) used a wide variety of printing processes, printing out some negatives in more than one medium. In his lectures, he pointed out that this approach to photography was important because in the hands of a photographer who “lives and understands the infinitely varied moods of nature, photography can be made to express and interpret them.” In correspondence with Dr. Olmstead at the Smithsonian, as the presentation of his gifts and bequest to the museum was being arranged, Eickemeyer wrote: “The collection illustrates the use of every important process and will, I believe, be of real educational value.”

The first of the Eickemeyer photographic collection came to the National Museum’s Department of Arts and Industries (the “Castle”), Division of Graphic Arts in 1922 at the close of a large exhibition of Eickemeyer’s work at the Anderson Gallery in New York. It was a gift from the photographer of five framed prints from the New York show that he considered representative of his work.

In 1929, Eickemeyer gave the Smithsonian 83 framed prints (including copies of the prints that he had previously given the museum), 15 portfolios, his medals and awards, and several miscellaneous photographic paraphernalia. In 1930, he made a will bequeathing most of his remaining prints, negatives, photographic equipment and other objects relating to his 30-year career as a photographer to the Smithsonian Institution.

Upon Eickemeyer’s death in 1932, an accession consisting primarily of photographic equipment from his studio came to the Smithsonian. Included in the bequest were 2 cameras, several lenses, scales, timers, printing frames, plate holders, dry mounters and a lecture case with slide projector and hand-colored lantern slides. Also included were 43 albums, journals and portfolios and assorted negatives and contact prints, many marked “discards.” There are 58 albums, notebooks and portfolios in the collection. Eickemeyer requested in his will that his gifts and bequests be called The Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. Collection.

Fox Trap Model

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Model - Fox Trap

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Netsuke (Fox Head)

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Inventory of the estate of George Fox

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Fox Software Lapel Pin

National Museum of American History

Cisco Houston - "The Fox"

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
For more information about this album, click here: http://www.folkways.si.edu/albumdetails.aspx?itemid=2323 and for more information about Smithsonian Folkways , the non-profit record label of the national museum, click here: http://www.folkways.si.edu/index.aspx This video features Cisco Houston's "The Fox" from the 1994 album "The Folkways Years, 1944-1961" on Smithsonian Folkways. Digital Downloads are available of this album in both MP3 and FLAC format. The content and comments posted here are subject to the Smithsonian Institution copyright and privacy policy (/www.si.edu/copyright/). Smithsonian reserves the right in its sole discretion to remove any content at any time. ©2008 Smithsonian Institution

Design for Signpost, Fox

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Design for signpost to be executed in iron. Within a bracket, a figure of a fox with a curving tail.

Ceremony, Fox Feast n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Photo 1909 or Before

Black and white photoprint

Group in Informal Costume with Foxes Tied to Pole Before Killing
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