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National Museum of American History

Shoplifter by Michael Cho

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
Aaarrrggghhh! These days, I seem to be in the wrong place all the time. Lucky DC-area folks: Do NOT NOT...

Peach Girl by Raymond Nakamura, illustrated by Rebecca Bender

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
Lest you’re tempted to dismiss this as just another gender-bender version of a familiar tale, banish that thought immediately! Yes,...

Where Are My Books? by Debbie Ridpath Ohi

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
“Spencer loved books.” And because he loves them so much, he makes sure to always put his books where they...

Song for a Summer Night: A Lullaby by Robert Heidbreder, illustrated by Qin Leng

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
In spite of the thunderous rainy hail that greeted me upon arrival at the Salt Lake City airport on Thursday...

Frontier #7: SexCoven by Jillian Tamaki

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
After yesterday’s SuperMutant Magic Academy, here’s a Jillian Tamaki bonus for non-kiddie readers. It’s lucky #7 in rebel San Francisco-based...

37c Hawaii single

National Postal Museum
Mint

serpentine die cut 10 3/4

Let's Reach For Our Future

National Museum of American History
A poster asking Asian Americans to respond to the 1990 census.

Japanese Americans and the U.S. Constitution: Topic 2 - Removal

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Section of the A More Perfect Union online exhibit focused on how the attack on Pearl Harbor led to Executive Order 9066, which was the first step in a program that uprooted Japanese Americans from their West Coast communities and placed them under armed guard for up to four years. This section uses artifacts from the Museum's collections, primary source documents, photographs and oral histories to discuss the early stages of this traumatic period, from the initial reactions and policies brought about by the attack on Pearl Harbor to the temporary assembly centers that were the first stop for Japanese American internees.

The Teodoro Vidal Collection: Interactive Map

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Interactive map for exploring the island and culture of Puerto Rico through historical objects and images.

Generations are Counting on You

National Museum of American History

Vietnamese American Curriculum

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Curriculum guide facilitates integrating Vietnamese American history and culture into the classroom. Unit topics include: 'Introduction to Vietnamese Americans,' 'Exit Saigon: from Refugees to Resettlement,' 'Enter Little Saigon: Vietnamese American Contributions,' and 'Culture and Community.' Targets grades 6-9.

34c Greetings from Hawaii single

National Postal Museum
mint

20c Hawaii Statehood single

National Postal Museum
mint

Cat Person by Seo Kim

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
Both my kids regularly refer to me as ‘the crazy cat lady.’ When Eldest gets especially annoyed, I get shooed...

spur with cord

National Museum of American History
The spurs were a gift from the paniolo cowboy Masatsu “Masa” Kawamoto. Spurs are the metal device attached to a cowboy’s boots that were used to dig into the horse’s side to encourage it to go faster. Masa has donated two different types of spurs. The first pair of spurs is made out of metal and leather with a piece of wire wrapped around it. The second pair of spurs is made from the traditional Spanish and Mexican style with a spiked metal wheel and a leather strap that fits the metal spur onto the boot.

left chaparrera

National Museum of American History
The spurs were a gift from the paniolo cowboy Masatsu “Masa” Kawamoto. Spurs are the metal device attached to a cowboy’s boots that were used to dig into the horse’s side to encourage it to go faster. Masa has donated two different types of spurs. The first pair of spurs is made out of metal and leather with a piece of wire wrapped around it. The second pair of spurs is made from the traditional Spanish and Mexican style with a spiked metal wheel and a leather strap that fits the metal spur onto the boot.

kaula 'ili braided lasso

National Museum of American History
The lasso was handmade by the paniolo cowboy Masatsu “Masa” Kawamoto. The lasso was an important tool for the paniolo cowboy because it was used to rope and catch animals. The lasso is a rope that traditionally has a sliding noose to adjust and grab different animals. Modern ropes are usually made out of nylon and mass produced in factories. Kaula ‘ili lasso is unique because it was handmade from strips of rawhide which were braided in the traditional style of creating lassos. The kaula ‘ili lasso can be braided with four, six, or eight strands depending on the desired strength. The process for creating this lasso requires experience and a steady hand

leatherworking design stamp

National Museum of American History
The leatherworking design stamps were another tool donated by the paniolo cowboy Masa Kawamoto. The stamps were a metal tool used by Masa to create decorative designs and impressions into the leather saddles. The decorative impressions on the leather saddles may have served a dual purpose of decoration and increasing traction, which helped the rider stay in place. Earlier forms of the stamps were traditionally handmade out of wood, horn, or bone.

right chaperrera

National Museum of American History
The spurs were a gift from the paniolo cowboy Masatsu “Masa” Kawamoto. Spurs are the metal device attached to a cowboy’s boots that were used to dig into the horse’s side to encourage it to go faster. Masa has donated two different types of spurs. The first pair of spurs is made out of metal and leather with a piece of wire wrapped around it. The second pair of spurs is made from the traditional Spanish and Mexican style with a spiked metal wheel and a leather strap that fits the metal spur onto the boot.

branding iron

National Museum of American History
The branding iron was an essential tool for many different cattle ranches. The branding iron consists of a metal rod and a symbol or brand that is heated and placed on the body of an animal to identify what ranch the animal belongs to . This branding iron was donated by the paniolo cowboy Masa Kawamoto who named his ranch the BO ranch. The symbol that is on the branding iron is BO. When the brand is seared into the animal, it shows that the animal belongs to the BO ranch.

leatherworking stamp tool

National Museum of American History
The leatherworking design stamps were another tool donated by the paniolo cowboy Masa Kawamoto. The stamps were a metal tool used by Masa to create decorative designs and impressions into the leather saddles. The decorative impressions on the leather saddles may have served a dual purpose of decoration and increasing traction, which helped the rider stay in place. Earlier forms of the stamps were traditionally handmade out of wood, horn, or bone.

Chaya restaurant napkin

National Museum of American History
Established in 1984, the Chaya Brasserie has been critically acclaimed as a premium Euro-Asian fusion upscale restaurant. Initially opening in Beverley Hills, Chaya restaurants have followed in Venice (1990), San Francisco (2000), and downtown L.A. (2009). (http://spoonwest.com/shigefumi-tachibe-2/)

Chaya’s logo and its characteristic typography is stamped diagonally across the napkin. The napkin itself is folded two times into a square.

Chaya restaurant chopsticks

National Museum of American History
Established in 1984, the Chaya Brasserie has been critically acclaimed as a premium Euro-Asian fusion upscale restaurant. Initially opening in Beverley Hills, Chaya restaurants have followed in Venice (1990), San Francisco (2000), and downtown L.A. (2009). (http://spoonwest.com/shigefumi-tachibe-2/)

This chopstick has the Chaya typography in one side, and the addresses and phone numbers of Chaya Brasserie in the Beverley Hills and Chaya in Venice.
145-168 of 1,347 Resources