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Shintaro-san of the Mountain: Mountains, Minyo, and Japanese Culture

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
This tutorial provides an introductory view into Japanese traditional ballads or folksongs, known as minyo, and folktales involving the cultural heritage of Japanese mountains. Basic background of Japanese traditional music and Japanese mountain folklore will be discussed.

Get Behind the Wheel

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teacher-created lesson in which middle-schoolers design a dashboard for a car that will be marketed to the 16- to 23-year-old set.

Viewing Device: New Perspective

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teacher-created lesson inspired by a viewing device designed by Albrecht Durer. Students design their own simple device for viewing perspective.

National Museum of the American Indian: Education Publications Order Form

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
PDF order form to obtain the School Program Guide, Pre-Visit Guide for Teachers, Teaching Posters, A Native Place Teaching Guide, Smithsonian in Your Classroom: Native Dolls, and the Family Guide. Can be faxed or e-mailed.

From Smithson to Smithsonian

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Online exhibition focusing on James Smithson, the English scientist who bequeathed his fortune to the United States to create the Smithsonian Institution. Traces the establishment of the Smithsonian Institution and its early years. Includes lesson plans.

Inventing Our Way Out of the Climate Change Problem? Innovative Youth Tackle the Issue

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Can new inventions address climate change? In this webinar, Smithsonian educator Tricia Edwards introduces the work of inventors concerned with sustainability issues, as well as to her own work in bringing young inventors and research scientists together on environmental projects.

Photosynthesis: Blinded by the Light

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Photosynthesis: Blinded by the Light – explores student misconceptions about matter and energy in photosynthesis and strategies for eliciting student ideas to address or build on them.

Delicious Peace: Music of the Ugandan Mirembe Kawomera Coffee Cooperative

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
The Mirembe Kawomera Coffee cooperative in Uganda is a movement designed to promote the sale of Ugandan coffee, but also to unite several culture groups, including Christians and Muslims, to promote a common cause of world peace. ‘Mirembe’ means ‘peace’ and ‘kawomera’ refers to the high quality nature of the coffee that this co-op sells. As part of the world peace movement, members of this co-op came together to record a musical album. This lesson explores much of the music that is found on this album.

Butterfly Gardening Fact Sheet

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Handout dicusses the life cycle of the butterfly and the importance of conservation in protecting these important insects. Students strengthen their biology vocabulary and learn what plants attract butterflies.

The Folkways Collection - Episode 10: Jazz

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
The Folkways collection is primarily regarded as a repository of folk music, but Moses Asch's appetite was eclectic if nothing else, and he was an early recorder of jazz music. A number of notable jazz recordings found their way into the collection. This Program explores the connections of a number of jazz greats, such as James P. Johnson and Mary Lou Williams, to the Folkways collection.

Unveiling Stories: Project Zero Global Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
A Project Zero “Global Thinking” routine for revealing multiple layers of meaning. This routine invites students to investigate the world and develop powerful habits of global journalism consumption. The framework asks students to consider five questions: “What is the story?,” “What is the human story?,” “What is the world story?,” “What is the new story?,” and “What is the untold story?”

UNVEILING STORIES

A routine for revealing multiple layers of meaning

1. What is the story?

2. What is the human story?

3. What is the world story?

4. What is the new story?

5. What is the untold story?

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

This routine invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in an image, text, or journalistic report. Each layer addresses a key dimension of quality global journalism: the central, most visible story; the way the story helps us understand the lives of fellow humans; the ways in which the story speaks to systemic global issues; what is new and instructive about the story and issues explored; and the important absences or unreported aspects of the story. This routine also invites students to investigate the world and develop powerful habits of global journalism consumption – habits that are transferable to information consumption more broadly.

Application: When and where can it be used?

This routine can be used in global competence development in the arts, geography, literature, and history.

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using this routine?

You may consider selecting some – not all – of the routine’s questions depending on your goals. You may also consider modifying the order in which the questions are introduced. In using this routine with your students, you may see “the story” interpreted in one of the following ways: 1) “the story” told by the article, image, or material that they read, or 2) “the story” proposed to explain or contextualize the event depicted, i.e. “the human story that led to the contamination of the Mexican gulf begins with our dependence on fossil fuels.”

Anthropology Teaching Activities: Studying Community Festivals

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Classroom activity explains the anthropological importance of studying festivals. Includes guiding questions to help students observe and report on a community festival.. Example observation and further reading also included.

Resources for Visually Impaired Visitors

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Offerings from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory that may be ordered or downloaded. The items include audio, Braille books, and tactile posters.

Watch, Listen, and Learn: Video and Audio from Smithsonian Gardens

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Videos feature scientists from Smithsonian Gardens discussing topics from architecture, to taxonomy, to horticulture career paths.

Famous Americans

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Game in which children are asked to match stamps depicting famous Americans.

Reading Mr. Lincoln's Whiskers

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Reading guide designed to help engage young readers as they read Mr. Lincoln's Whiskers, a children's book based on a true story about a girl who writes a letter to Abraham Lincoln. It includes four active reading strategies that will help children identify new vocabulary, make predictions, and think about the characters and their emotions. Part of the resource 'A Letter to Abraham Lincoln.'

World Habitat Classroom Activities

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teacher-created lesson in which students consider whether everyone in their community has access to adequate shelter. They write a persuasive paper on the subject.

An Introduction to the Music of Mongolia

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Students will be introduced to the music of Mongolia through several activities looking into different aspects of Mongolian music. Students will be introduced to the sound of the Morin Khuur (horse-head fiddle), the techniques of Khöömei (throat singing), and given an opportunity to play a traditional Mongolian song with western instruments.

Hootenanny, Hootin' Annie, Will You Dance with Me? Music of the American Folk Music Revival

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
This lesson is intended to introduce students to the music of the American folk revival that developed between the 1940s and 1960s with notable figures such as Pete Seeger, Burl Ives, Jean Ritchie, Paul Robeson, and many others. Students will engage in singing, clapping, contra dancing.

"English is Crazy (English is Kuh-ray-zee)" by Pete Seeger for Smithsonian Staff

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Now regarded as the dean of 20th-century folk singers, Pete Seeger started recording for Folkways founder Moses Asch in 1943. Asch continued to record Pete during the 1950s and beyond, with Pete eventually recording over fifty records for him and Folkways Records. Now in his eighties, Pete continues to make an occasional recording and still plays an occasional concert, where his audiences always sing along with him in unison. In 2005 he performed Josh White Jr.'s song "English Is Crazy" at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage in Washington, D.C., leading Smithsonian employees in the chorus "English is kuh-ray-zee."

"O Canada" by Asani at 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Many cultures, ethnic identities, and languages flourish in Canada. French, English, Scottish, and Irish immigrants have maintained their cultural heritage across generations, as have Aboriginal peoples fiercely determined to preserve their ways of life in the wake of oppressive colonialism and its injustices. Recent American, Eastern and Northern European, and Asian immigrants also contribute to the cultural mosaic. "O, Canada," the Canadian national anthem, was originally written in French in 1880, and the English version was chosen as the country's official anthem in 1980. Here Asani, an Aboriginal women's a cappella group from Edmonton, Alberta, present a stirring rendition of "O, Canada," re-imagined to reflect the myriad peoples who call Canada their homeland.

Imagining Abraham Lincoln

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson has children read Mr. Lincoln's Whiskers then use what they have learned about Abraham Lincoln to add a scene to the story in the form of a comic strip. Included in the resource 'A Letter to Abraham Lincoln.'

What's for Lunch? Outreach Program, Grade 3

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Classroom program where students learn how scientists study omnivores, carnivores, and herbivores. Students collect data on teeth from skulls of endangered species studied by National Zoo scientists, develop a hypothesis about what each animal might eat and why, and then check their conclusions. For Grade 3. Advanced booking and fee required.

Art to Zoo: Small Worlds: Stamps as Storytellers (1985)

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson plan demonstrating how stamps can illustrate events and ideas within a single small picture�_�in this case, ideas and events related to westward expansion. A mini-article and pullout page about a postal mascot, Owney the Dog, is also included in English and Spanish.
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