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Found 1,677 Collections

 

Uprooted Dreams

Uprooted Dreams (Alebrijes)

On permanent display in the Education Area upstairs at the ESB-MACC is Uprooted Dreams (2012), a site-specific sculptural installation that features over 19 individual, brightly colored woodcarvings, mounted in the public entrance of the Education Area. Artist Margarita Cabrera was selected to create an artwork which would engage the community in its production. "Uprooted Dreams is a work of art designed in the form of workshop production...nineteen members of Austin's immigrant community- guided by Master Artesanos, Ranulfo Sergio Ibañes and Lucia Luria Sosa, experts in the Mexican craft tradition of alebrije-created, carved and painted wooden sculptures. These pieces embodied artistic themes of uprootedness as they spoke to the transformation of people, land, and community. For the artist, artesanos, participants, and audience, the process and product of Uprooted Dreams provides an ongoing platform on which to build respect, equality, solidarity, and dignified ways of making art and creating community.   - Margarita Cabrera

#ethnicstudies 

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center
25
 

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center Virtual Tour

Take a virtual tour of the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center on-site art installations.

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center
55
 

Manifest Destiny and Westward Expansion Winners and Losers

This collection explores Leutze's Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way as well as other images in connection to westward expansion,  

Who were the winners of Manifest Destiny, and who were the losers?  

Students will explore images to look for clues to this question.


#SAAMteach

Tracey Barhorst
9
 

Voices of Women

Women who have lended their voices to the positive movement of underrepresented people. 

Angela L Davis Henry
30
 

Traqueros, part 1: The Mexican American Railroad Workers

Traqueros ('track workers') were Mexican and Mexican American laborers who were instrumental in the building and expansion of the railroad throughout the U.S., from the mid- to late-19th century until the early- to mid-20th century. 

Following the implementation of the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882), Chinese immigrant labor - central to the construction of the transcontinental railroad (1869) - was extremely curtailed, and Mexican workers were relied upon to fill the labor void. By 1900, U.S. railroads employed over 1 million people, which increased to almost 1.8 million by 1925. According to the late historian Jeffrey Marcos Garcilazo, in his book Traqueros: Mexican Railroad Workers In The United States, 1870-1930 (2012): "Between 1880 and 1930, Mexican track workers constituted almost two-thirds of the track labor forces in the Southwest, Central Plains, and Midwest" (p.34). 

The U.S. federal government's Immigration Act (1917), while curtailing European immigration, exempted Mexican immigrants coming to work in the U.S. from its restrictions, largely because of the abundant reliance on Mexican labor in the railroad industry. By even the 1890s, the U.S. railroad labor force was so largely Mexican that the Southern Pacific Railroad adopted the practice of employing Mexican cooks in their workers' camps to satisfy the appetites of their immigrant laborers. 

The legacy of traqueros is largely forgotten in U.S. history books about labor and the building of our country, but recent and ongoing scholarship is revealing the vital role of traqueros in the strengthening of the U.S. economy, transportation system, and large-scale industry since the Civil War.

#EthnicStudies #MexicanAmericans #Traqueros #Railroads #Latinos #Chicanos


David Colon
3
 

Mexican American Family Stories through Art

Student activity collection analyzing the work of two very different Mexican American artists, identifying aspects of culture and exploring expressions about Latino experiences in art. Included in this collection, are five paintings highlighting Latino families, paired with observation and analysis questions and interviews with the artists, Carmen Lomas Garza and Jesse Treviño, as well as podcast analyses of the paintings from the museum's director. As a supplement, students could read a book by Garza depicting her childhood memories of growing up in a traditional Mexican American community, or lead a discussion comparing this artwork with other images of Latino families. #ethnicstudies

Lanette Aguero
20
 

Ethnic Music Samples

A variety of music/dance from Africa, South America, the Caribbean and more.  #ethnicstudies

Laura Herrera
13
 

Latino Immigration to US #ethnicstudies

Images that tell a story on Latino Immigration to the USA. #ethnicstudies

Lynda Harkins
14
 

John Lewis: Activism, Sacrifice, Legend

justice, equality, fight for freedom #EthnicStudies

Atrice Adeniyi
25
 

Beauty/Truth/Revealing/and Concealing: Adding complexity to a literary analysis (Wrap up lesson with "A Doll's House," by Henrik Ibsen) #SAAMTeach

While this lesson revolves around Henrik Ibsen's "A Doll's House," it can be used in conjunction with any work of literature featuring strong characters - the type who generate potentially negative reactions among students, such as: "I hate him... There's nothing good about ______....he's the villain... she's the hero, etc." The lesson is designed to push students out of their comfort zone, give themselves permission to speculate and entertain a variety of viewpoints, and as a means to step away from the literature they just read, then step back in with perhaps a more open-minded approach.

This is a discussion-heavy lesson, requiring some patience on the part of the teacher not to jump in and fill in the gaps. But after completing it the first, second, and then third time, I could definitely sense the students were now more apt to be "risk takers" and more "open minded" with their interpretations and insight.

Step by step instructions follow in the "Notes to Other Users" section. #SAAMTeach

Annette Spahr
8
 

America & Athletics

Christina Ratatori
13
 

U.S. Dollars in Liberia

The Value of Money exhibition's new acquisition case is currently featuring a display on the use of U.S. Dollars in Liberia.  This Learning Lab makes this display available digitally. 

U.S. Dollars in Liberia 

From 1820 to 1904, about 16,000 people formerly enslaved in the United States sailed to West Africa and established the country now known as Liberia. The American Colonization Society, which sought to create a colony in Africa for formerly enslaved people, issued currency like this 1833 token and established a government led by white officials. 

In 1847 Liberian migrants declared independence from the American Colonization Society and issued their own coins as a symbol of nationhood. The coins were minted in England and circulated alongside indigenous currencies like the Kissi penny. In the late 19th and early 20th century, the Liberian government struggled with debt, making it difficult for the Liberian dollar to maintain its value. As a result, merchants and then the government began to use the colonial currency of British West Africa instead. 

In 1943, with financial help from the U.S. government, the U.S. dollar replaced British West African shillings as the primary currency in circulation. The Liberian dollar continued to be in use as small change. Today Liberia is one of few nations with a dual currency system, as both American and Liberian dollars circulate alongside each other. In 2019 the National Numismatic Collection acquired contemporary Liberian banknotes to help tell this story. 

Suggested Reading:

Gardner, Leigh A. "The rise and fall of sterling in Liberia, 1847-1943." Economic History Review 67, no. 4 (2014): pp. 1089-1112. 

Rosenberg, Emily S. Financial Missionaries to the World: The Politics and Culture of Dollar Diplomacy 1900-1830. Chapel Hill: Duke University Press, 2007. 


 To see all of the West African currency objects in the National Numismatic Collection, click here.  Please feel free to reach out to Dr. Leigh Gardner or Dr. Ellen Feingold with questions or feedback.

This project was generously funded by the Knowledge Exchange and Impact Fund at the London School of Economics. It was completed in partnership with the Smithsonian’s National Numismatic Collection.




NMAH and London School of Economics
7
 

Test 2

a test 

Miguel Mascorro
1
 

Rome.MHS

Matthew Rodriguez
1
 

Canada

Frank Ites
3
 

Facing Genocide: The US Response to the Holocaust

My aunt remembers sitting at the kitchen table as a child while her parents, my grandparents, read the Yiddish newspaper, Der Tag. Often one would start crying, saying, nishta ("gone"), "this one nishta; that one nishta," in response to the paper's lists of towns in Europe overrun by the Nazis. 

This collection examines the US response to the Holocaust, pairing historical documentation with four thinking routines from Harvard's Project Zero Global Thinking and Agency by Design materials - "Unveiling Stories," :Think, Feel, Care," "The 3 Y's," and "Circles of Action," - to prompt students to ask important questions about our individual and collective responsibility to humanity. 

Included here are photographs, documentation, and resources from the National Museum of American History and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM), including a teaching resource and USHMM's online exhibition, Americans and the Holocaust, which examines "the motives, pressures, and fears that shaped Americans’ responses to Nazism, war, and genocide." Examined with thinking routines from Harvard's Project Zero Global Thinking and Agency by Design materials, students will explore complex and deeply troubling issues that continue to have relevance today. 

This collection complements chapter 14 ("World War II and America's Ethnic Problem") of Ronald Takaki's A Different Mirror for Young People: A History of Multicultural America, and supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, and Unit 3: Local History and Current Issues, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course. 

#EthnicStudies


Philippa Rappoport
19
 

Artifacts tell stories of the Encounter and Frontier

A collection of artifacts from which our students will choose an object of study for their first project cycle. Student swill be using historical, scientific, literary, mathematical and artistic techniques to help their chosen artifact tell a story of an encounter in history between two groups and/or cultures.

Andrew Meyers
47
 

Activism and Change: Clara Lemlich and the New York Shirtwaist Strike of 1909

This teaching collection asks students to consider photographs and documentation about early 20th-century Jewish immigrant activist Clara Lemlich (1886-1982, leader of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union and founder of the Progressive Women’s Councils), in the larger context of New York's Garment Industry, the New York Shirtwaist Strike of 1909, and the 1911 Triangle Waist Factory fire. By pairing historical documentation with three thinking routines from Harvard's Project Zero Global Thinking and Agency by Design materials - "Step In, Step Out, Step Back," "Think, Feel, Care," and "Circles of Action," - the collection encourages students to explore complexity and perspective, and fosters a disposition to participate. 

Included here are photographs, documentation, and resources from the Jewish Women's Archive's Encyclopedia of Jewish Women, the Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives at Cornell University's Industrial and Labor Relations School, the Tenement Museum, and the National Museum of American History. 

This collection pairs well with chapter 11 ("Jews are Pushed from Russia") of Ronald Takaki's A Different Mirror for Young People: A History of Multicultural America, and supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, and Unit 3: Local History and Current Issues, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course. 

#EthnicStudies

Philippa Rappoport
16
 

Native American Beading: Examples, Artist Interview, Demonstration and Printable Instructions for Hands-on Activity

This collection looks at examples of bead work among Native American women, in particular Kiowa artist Teri Greeves, and helps students to consider these works as both expressions of the individual artist and expressions of a cultural tradition.

The collection includes work samples and resources, an interview with Ms. Greeves, demonstration video of how to make a Daisy Chain bracelet, and printable instructions.

Naomi Manzella
6
 

Selma and A March for Freedom

Sunday morning, March 7, 1965, several hundred protesters gathered in Selma, Alabama planning to march to Montgomery in the hopes of obtaining federal protection for a voting rights statute. 


Key terms:

Civil Rights

Civil Rights Movement

Tanis Ockwell
5
 

Asian Americans with Disabilities in America

This collection was created by Mark Ferrer, a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center intern. "My name is Mark Ferrer. I was the first deaf intern at APAC. I practically researched issues that I thought might help people with disabilities like me. I was resourceful and used the opportunities to create awareness for Asians with disabilities. I entitled my research as Asian Americans with Disabilities in America."


About the Asian Americans with Disabilities in America, Asian is one of the fastest-growing racial groups in the U.S. and the growth rate of Asians with disabilities progressively swelling (worsening). They were being categorized and called the handicapped, the disabled and the feeble-minded. The language barriers, not enough support, being the model minority and confusion between two cultures were only a few of the many challenges they faced. It was during the 19th and 20th centuries that they suffer from discrimination but became beneficiaries when ADA was passed in 1990. It is truly remarkable that this collection will give you information and awareness about the status of the Asians and disabled in America.

Mark Ferrer
20
 

Digital Museum Resources for the High School Ethnic Studies Classroom (Irving Arts Center )

This collection includes digital museum resources and replicable activities that will serve as a springboard for discussion during the Exploration of Ethnic Studies workshop at the Irving Arts Center on October 16, 2019. The collection models how digital museum resources can be leveraged to support critical thinking and deeper learning for high school Ethnic Studies curricula. The collection can be copied and adapted for use in your own classroom. 

This program received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

#EthnicStudies

Keywords: Ethnic Studies, Mexican American Studies, MAS

Philippa Rappoport
50
 

Ancient Greek Vases

Resources and directions for middle school Greek vase art project.


Directions:

  1. On a piece of orange construction paper draw an outline of a Greek vase, (or vessel, pot, jar)
  2. Cut out your vase.
  3. Choose a story or image from ancient Greece. Examples include greek myths, Olympics, and battle stories.
  4. In the center of the vase use a black sharpie marker to illustrate your story.
  5. On the neck and base of your vase use at least 5  of the patterns to decorate. (2+ on neck,3+ on base)
  6. Finally, glue your orange vase onto a piece of black construction paper
  7. Save the extra orange paper that you cut away for decorating the edges like a mosaic alternating with white.


Tracey Barhorst
19
145-168 of 1,677 Collections