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Found 617 Collections

 

Space race

This collection is supporting my research paper on the History of the Space Race and how it lead to the US successfully putting a man on the moon, a feat they have not repeated in over 40 years.

Raymond Turner
13
 

Space Food

Curated on an iPhone during the presentation at ISTE2016
Dave Johnson
5
 

Space Exploration: The Early Years

A collection of resources depicting space exploration from 1957 to 1969.
Linda Muller
35
 

Sound Waves

#tii #NASMteachers

Carrie Akins
8
 

Sorting through astronomical nebulae.

At the turn of the nineteenth century, astronomers using basic telescopes recorded the existence of an amazing collection of nebulae. These appeared as different types of fuzzy gray material. At that time, technology did not exist to separate the nebulae into different categories. This mini lab has selected representative types of each nebulae and the characteristics of each.

Arthur Glaser
8
 

Solving Complex Problems with Simple Machines

Simple machines can be found almost anywhere from nineteenth-century water powered mills, to modern day construction sites. Once you know what to look for you’ll be surprised at how many simple machines you use in your daily life. Join STEM in 30 as they visit many people who work with simple machines every day to complete tasks both big and small.

National Air and Space Museum
13
 

Solar System

Rosemary Herold
9
 

Solar Eclipse Special: Live from the Path of Totality

A total solar eclipse will sweep across America on August 21, 2017. Tune in to STEM in 30 as we celebrate the Great American Eclipse live from Liberty, Missouri, which is on the Path of Totality. This means that the total solar eclipse will be viewable, weather permitting, and we’ll be there to show it as it happens. We will also be live from the Phoebe Waterman Haas Public Observatory at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC, answering FAQs about eclipses.

August 21, 2017

National Air and Space Museum
18
 

Soil: Highlights Collection

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, recordings, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Soil has a microbiome, too. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account. If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
14
 

Social Justice: Opening Panel Resources

This collection previews the opening panel of the 2017 Montgomery College / Smithsonian Institution Fellowship seminar series, Social Justice: America's Unfinished Story of Struggle, Strife, and Sacrifice. Four Smithsonian staff members will speak at this event: Igor Krupnik (Arctic Studies Center, Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History), Lanae Spruce (National Museum of African American History and Culture), Ranald Woodaman (Smithsonian Latino Center), and E. Carmen Ramos (Smithsonian American Art Museum).

Each text annotation in this collection contains each speaker's presentation title, description, and bio. Following each text annotation are resources and questions chosen by the presenters for participants to consider before the panel itself.

#MCteach

Tess Porter
17
 

Social Justice: National Portrait Gallery Resources

This collection previews the fifth and final seminar of the 2017 Montgomery College / Smithsonian Institution Fellowship seminar series, The Struggle for Justice. Two National Portrait Gallery staff members will lead this event: David Ward and Briana Zavadil White.

Resources and questions included in this collection have been chosen by the presenters for participants to explore and consider before the seminar itself.

#MCSI

David Bedar
24
 

Social Justice: National Portrait Gallery Resources

This collection previews the fifth and final seminar of the 2017 Montgomery College / Smithsonian Institution Fellowship seminar series, The Struggle for Justice. Two National Portrait Gallery staff members will lead this event: David Ward and Briana Zavadil White.

Resources and questions included in this collection have been chosen by the presenters for participants to explore and consider before the seminar itself.

#MCteach

Tess Porter
24
 

Social Justice: National Museum of the American Indian Resources

This collection previews the second seminar of the 2017 Montgomery College / Smithsonian Institution Fellowship seminar series, The Native American Struggle for Treaty Rights and Tribal Sovereignty. Three National Museum of the American Indian staff members will lead this event: Mark Hirsch, David Penney, and Colleen Call Smith.

Resources included in this collection have been chosen by the presenters for participants to explore before the seminar itself.

#MCteach

Tess Porter
7
 

Social Justice: National Museum of American History Resources

This collection previews the third seminar of the 2017 Montgomery College / Smithsonian Institution Fellowship seminar series, American Democracy in the Trump Age. Harry Rubenstein, Curator and Chair of the Division of Political History at the National Museum of American History, will lead this event.

Resources and questions included in this collection have been chosen by the presenter for participants to explore, consider, and answer before the seminar itself.

#MCteach

Tess Porter
7
 

Social Justice: National Museum of African American History and Culture Resources

This collection previews the first seminar of the 2017 Montgomery College / Smithsonian Institution Fellowship seminar series, A Journey Through the African American Lens. Five National Museum of African American History and Culture staff members will lead this event: Kinshasha Holman Conwill, Dr. Rex Ellis, Dr. Jacquelyn Serwer, Dr. Michèle Gates Moresi, and Mary Elliott.

Resources and reflection questions included in this collection have been chosen by the presenters for participants to explore, consider, and answer before the seminar itself. Fellows will be asked to discuss their answers to the reflection questions during the seminar.

#MCteach

Tess Porter
41
 

Social Justice: Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage Resources

This collection previews the fourth seminar of the 2017 Montgomery College / Smithsonian Institution Fellowship seminar series, The Social Power of Music. Two staff members from the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage will lead this event: James Deutsch and Atesh Sonneborn.

Resources and questions included in this collection have been chosen by the presenters for participants to explore and consider before the seminar itself. Two resources, included at the end of the collection, are optional materials for those interested in addtional background information on Smithsonian Folkways.

#MCteach

Tess Porter
7
 

Soap – History, Uses, and Chemistry

Soap is a common household chemical used around the world. Using the See/Think/Wonder visible thinking tool, this collection explores:

  1. The history of soap,
  2. Why Ivory soap floats,
  3. Why soap can be used for cleaning, and
  4. How is soap made.
Kitty Dang
10
 

Snowflakes in Wilson A. Bentley's Collection

This topical collection includes images from Wilson A. Bentley's snowflake photography collection, which was donated to the Smithsonian in 1903. Bentley used a bellows camera that had a microscope inside to capture these small and unique natural objects. Also included in the collection is the original correspondence between Bentley and the Smithsonian, as well as ideas for using these sources in the classroom from the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Ashley Naranjo
26
 

Snowboarding; Evolution of Sport, Products, and Culture

Investigating the evolution of Snowboarding as a transformative force in snow sport culture and professional athletics, a driver of product engineering and design, and a powerful voice for environmental stewardship that resonates with our youth.

Navigation North
13
 

Smithsonian Science How: Exploring the Coral Reefs of Belize

Teachers: Use this collection of resources to prepare for the Oct. 8, 2019 Smithsonian Science How webcast programs, Tracking the Health of Coral Reefs: Live from Belize. The webcast programs will be broadcast live at 2pm and 3:30pm ET. To sign up and get more information, visit: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning/tracking-health-coral-reefs-live-belize


How to use this collection: Use this collection of resources to learn more about the scientists being featured in the live broadcasts, about the Carrie Bow Cay Field Station in Belize, and to access resources about coral reef habitats and health.  Download and print the pre- and post-webcast worksheet, or paste the questions into your own Google Classroom assignment (word doc). 


Start a conversation: We suggest using these resources to start a conversation with your students about who does science and how they do it. You can extend their understanding of how real science happens in the field by participating in our live webcasts on Oct. 8, 2019. Here are some questions to help facilitate a conversation with your students:

  • Before reviewing resources: What do you think marine scientists study?  Can you think of an example of a marine habitat? How do you think scientists study marine habitats? What kind of tools do you think they can use to study underwater habitats? 
  • After reviewing resources: Do you have new ideas about what a marine scientist is? What are they? What is something you might have in common a marine scientist? What kind of tools do these marine scientists use for their research? What marine habitat are they studying? What's one way you can observe the world around you, like a scientist?





About the Carrie Bow Cay Field Station, Belize, Central America

The Smithsonian Institution has a field station in Belize, which is located on a small island called Carrie Bow Cay. To get there, scientists must take a 15-mile boat ride from the town of Dangriga, Belize. Researchers from all over the world have been conducting research from this tiny field station for the 50 years that Smithsonian has been operating the station.

The Smithsonian’s Carrie Bow Cay Marine Field Station supports research projects of marine scientists year-round. It offers ready access to a variety of habitats, including thousands of small mangrove islands, countless patch coral reefs, vast seagrass meadows, underwater caves, three off-shore atolls, and the Belize mainland. 

Carrie Bow Cay is located 14 miles offshore, located on the barrier reef off the coast of Belize and within the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef, which contains the largest barrier reef if in the Western Hemisphere and second largest in the world, second only to the Great Barrier Reef in Australia.

This reef system contains many different kinds of coral, which provide homes and food to hundreds of fish species, turtles and countless invertebrates, which are animals without backbones, like snails, squid, sea anemones, sea stars and urchins, and crustaceans like crabs and shrimp.

Coral reefs are important habitats for not just the plants and animals that live there, but for the health of the entire ocean. As our ocean changes, so are coral reefs. 

Scientists use the Carrie Bow Cay marine station to study and monitor these changes. MarineGEO, a global partnership program operated by the Smithsonian Institution, sends scientists to the Carrie Bow Cay marine station every year to monitor these reef systems, along with the other nearby habitats like mangroves and sea grass beds. 


Maggy Benson
15
 

Smithsonian in Your Classroom: "Under the Spell of ...Spiders!"

The issue presents curriculum-spanning ways of teaching about arachnids. Includes teacher background, lessons, and a bilingual student page. Click on the PDF icon to download.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
6
 

Smithsonian in Your Classroom: "Lewis and Clark and the Language of Discovery"

Lesson plans in this issue focus on Lewis and Clark as keepers of journals. Click on the PDF icon to download. Please also see an interactive map on the site "Lewis & Clark as Naturalists" from the National Museum of Natural History.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
3
 

Sites Unseen: Navigating Complexity and Grappling with Uncertainty

Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen combines the disciplines of art, science, and investigative journalism to bring unseen and, at times, unsettling elements of our contemporary world to light. Zooming outward from personal, to local, and finally global implications of this work, participants will work collaboratively to identify extensions and troubleshoot any challenges of this content for the classroom.

All Grade Levels

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
15
 

Sink Float

OBJECTIVES:

  • Experiment with objects to see if they sink or float
  • Learn that boats float
  • Discuss how sometimes boats sink and learn the word shipwreck 
  • Look closely at the 3D model of the Philadelphia Gunboat (a boat which sunk and was then later brought to the surface and into the Natural History Museum)
  • Make ships out of aluminum foil and experiment to see how many pennies can go on the boat before it sinks
Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
22
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