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Found 544 Collections

 

Scenes about Community

What makes a community? This set can be used to explore the many intricate parts that make up a community! Included are thinking routines that can help students dig deeper into the topic and each artwork.

Eveleen Eaton
31
 

Samuel Langley, Solar Scientist

Samuel Langley was the director of the Allegheny Observatory very near the city of Pittsburgh. Langley focused his telescope on the sun each clear day hoping to find its secrets and energy output.

Arthur Glaser
21
 

Richard Wright: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Richard Wright, an American author whose works investigate the toll that racial prejudice exerted on society. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture.  

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how they wanted to be seen, or how others wanted them to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created (such as the stamp, etc.).
  • Having read one of his stories, does the portrait capture your image of Richard Wright? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Richard Wright, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: mississippi, ms, writer, native son

Tess Porter
6
 

Rethinking Americans

This collection serves as a preview for the second of six seminar sessions in the 2019 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “The Search for an American Identity: Building a Nation Together.”

National Museum of American Indian colleagues Paul Chaat Smith, Cecile R. Ganteaume, Colleen Call Smith, and Mandy Van Heuvelen will provide a behind the scenes look at the most daring exhibition the National Museum of the American Indian has ever staged. The exhibition argues that Native American imagery is everywhere in American life, and rather than being merely kitsch, stereotype, and cultural appropriation, it is evidence of the centrality of Indians in both history and 21st century life in the United States.

Resources included in this collection have been chosen by the presenters for participants to explore before the seminar itself.

#MCteach
Philippa Rappoport
8
 

Representational, Abstract, or Nonrepresentational?

Introductory Activity: Print image cards for small group collaboration. Students will sort images into three categories:

  1. Representational Art (realistic imagery)
  2. Abstract Art (recognizable imagery that does not reflect actual appearance)
  3. Nonrepresentational Art (does not represent a depiction of the physical appearance of people or objects)

Formal Analysis Activity: 

Choose a few images to compare and contrast: How did the artist use line, shape, color, balance, repetition, or overall composition to convey

  1. The illusion of movement or rhythm
  2. Visual tension
  3. A mood or feeling

NOTE: pdf file of these images is meant to be printed front-to-back so that citations will appear on the reverse side of each image. 


Jean-Marie Galing
25
 

Religion in Diaspora: How did a Shofar Come to the National Museum of African American History and Culture?

This teaching collection asks students to consider a Jewish ritual object, the shofar, as an entry point to discuss the transmission of traditions and beliefs across the globe. Using Project Zero looking and global thinking  routines, students can examine images of shofars, listen to shofar music,  explore photos from African American Jewish communities,  and consider how traditions and religious beliefs are carried around the globe with their practitioners. The activity concludes with a discussion to foster in students a broader understanding and appreciation of today’s complex world.

Philippa Rappoport
24
 

Rediscovering Korea's Past - Goryeo Period

The Goryeo period (918-1392) is referred to as Korea’s age of enlightenment, when arts and cultures flourished under the patronage of the Goryeo aristocracy. Buddhism was the official state religion, which Buddhist temples and members of the royal court committed a huge portion of their resources to the practice of faith and to the creation of ritual implements and artworks as expressions of devotion. 

Tremendous ceramics, lacquer wares, Buddhist paintings and sculptures, illustrated manuscripts, and metal crafts in Buddhist symbols and motifs were made during this period. The Goryeo period is widely known as the jade-green glazed, graceful shape, elegant floral motifs and decorative inlaid design celadons to the Western culture.  

This Learning Lab Collection is created for Summer Institute for Educators, Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections. 

Keywords: Korea, Goryeo, Celadon, Buddhism, Inlay, Jade-green, Glazed, Ceramics

#AsiaTeachers

Minchi Hyun
21
 

Reconstruction in the American South #TeachingInquiry

This collection contains images, lithographs, and written documents pertaining to the period of Reconstruction. Reconstruction marks the period in American history beginning in 1863 and lasting through 1877. This collection will help to better understand the role Reconstruction played in re-establishing race relations and enfranchising African Americans, but also the struggles African Americans faced in upholding their rights. People who view this collection will be able to analyze and respond to the question "Was Reconstruction successful?" #TeachingInquiry

Rania Assily
10
 

Recognizing the American Dream Lesson


#SAAMteach

Maria Ryan
6
 

Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, 2019-2020: Session 4

What does it take to prepare our youth for a world on the move with quality?

This collection is the fourth in a series of five created to support the Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, held between December 2019 to May 2020. The seminar series is led by Verónica Boix Mansilla, Senior Principal Investigator for Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero, and Research Director for Re-Imagining Migration, with in-gallery experiences provided by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Museum of American History, the National Portrait Gallery, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the National Gallery of Art.

This set of collections is designed to be dynamic. We will continue to add material, including participant-created content, throughout the seminar series so that the collections themselves can be used as a type of textbook, reflecting the content, development, and outputs of the full seminar series. Please check back to the hashtag #ReImaginingMigration to see a growing body of materials to support educators as they strive to serve and teach about human migration in relevant and deep ways.

In this session, held online while we are all home social distancing in the time of COVID-19, we will

* examine how immigrant origin youth may be experiencing the epidemic

* experiment with a set of revised socio-emotional thinking routines, and

* gather your input about the ways in which Re-imagining Migration together with the Smithsonian Learning Lab and the National Gallery of Art can support you as you prepare to engage students in digital learning.

#ReImaginingMigration

Re-imagining Migration
29
 

Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, 2019-2020: Session 3

What are the habits of mind, heart, dialog and civility necessary to live in a world on the move?  
Exploring together an emerging set of socio-emotional routines.

This collection is the third in a series of four created to support the Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, held between December 2019 to March 2020. The seminar series is led by Verónica Boix Mansilla, Senior Principal Investigator for Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero, and Research Director for Re-Imagining Migration, with in-gallery experiences provided by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Museum of American History, the National Portrait Gallery, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the National Gallery of Art.

This set of collections is designed to be dynamic. We will continue to add material, including participant-created content, throughout the seminar series so that the collections themselves can be used as a type of textbook, reflecting the content, development, and outputs of the full seminar series. Please check back to the hashtag #ReImaginingMigration to see a growing body of materials to support educators as they strive to serve and teach about human migration in relevant and deep ways.

Thank you to Beth Evans and Briana Zavadil White of the National Portrait Gallery for the in-gallery activity and supporting content.


#ReImaginingMigration

Key words: Reimagining Migration

Philippa Rappoport
46
 

Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, 2019-2020: Session 1

What does it take to prepare our youth for a world on the move with quality?

This collection is the first in a series of four created to support the Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, held between December 2019 to March 2020. The seminar series is led by Verónica Boix Mansilla, Senior Principal Investigator for Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero, and Research Director for Re-Imagining Migration, with in-gallery experiences provided by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Museum of American History, the National Portrait Gallery, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the National Gallery of Art.

This set of collections is designed to be dynamic. We will continue to add material, including participant-created content, throughout the seminar series so that the collections themselves can be used as a type of textbook, reflecting the content, development, and outputs of the full seminar series. Please check back to the hashtag #ReImaginingMigration to see a growing body of materials to support educators as they strive to serve and teach about human migration in relevant and deep ways.

Thank you to Elizabeth Dale-DeinesPhoebe Hilleman, and Carol Wilson of the Smithsonian American Art Museum for the in-gallery activity and supporting content.


#ReImaginingMigration

Philippa Rappoport
39
 

Quilt Quest

Did you know that quilts are also historical artifacts? Use this collection to learn more about how curators investigate quilts to learn about their origins, and then explore a variety of different quilts that tell us important things about the time in which they were made and the crafters who made them. Finally, make your own quilt depicting an important historical moment.

tags: quilt, craft, activity, review

Kate Harris
19
 

PZ Perspectives Conference

While they may be little, young children are capable of deep thinking, perspective taking, sharing ideas and taking action; all skills necessary to be an active participant in society. Not only should young children be included and respected as citizens of both the local and global community, fostering these skills encourages the next generation to be invested in the betterment of society. Art is an effective and engaging catalyst to build these civic skills with young children. In this collection, educators from the Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center and the Quaker Valley School District share their use of artwork and thinking routines in their practice with young children. Through hearing stories, seeing examples, and engaging in model lessons, participants will experience relevant thinking routines, have opportunities to reflect on techniques presented and work cooperatively with peers as they create lessons inspired by provided artworks modeled techniques. Participants will leave the session feeling inspired and confident to incorporate art into their practice to build civic skills using demonstrated techniques.


Andrea Croft
49
 

Purple Hibiscus

All resources that I've gathered to teach Adiche 's novel in Fall 2017.I have also begun a collection specific to Smithsonian exhibits and resources.

Joanna Howard
17
 

Puerto Rico’s Fragile Modernity: An Exploration of Francisco Rodón's Portrait of Luis Muñoz Marín, using Global Thinking Routines

This teaching collections aims to help students to think critically about Puerto Rico's past and present, as portrayed in the media and through close looking at a portrait. The collection explores Francisco Rodón's monumental portrait of Luis Muñoz Marín, the first democratically elected governor of Puerto Rico, known as “the Father of Modern Puerto Rico.” Although the portrait and supporting video with National Portrait Gallery curator Taína Caragol were created before Hurricane Maria devastated the island in September 2017, a close examination of the portrait itself lends a deeper understanding not only of Francisco Rodón, but of the history of Puerto Rico itself, both pre- and post-Hurricane Maria.

Included here are the portrait from the National Portrait Gallery, a video with the curator, two suggested Global Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero materials, a lesson plan from PBS Media on Puerto Rican Perspectives, and three news articles (from Vox and the New York Times) about Hurricane Maria, at the time in 2017 and almost one year later.

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, American History, Art History classes

#LatinoHAC, #EthnicStudies 

This collection supports Unit 3: Critical Geography and Current Issues, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course ("In this unit, students will identify historical patterns to understand how past events influence current policies, ideas and practices.") and Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course ("How do government policies and the judicial system in a democratic society impact diverse groups and communities?").

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 

Philippa Rappoport
12
 

Prototyping: Making and Exploration

In this collection, explore prototyping. Here, you'll find examples of prototypes from the Cooper Hewitt collection and a prototyping activity to do at home or in the classroom.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
25
 

Project Zero Thinking Routines

These slides are from Harvard’s Graduate School of Education —Project Zero.

#MCteach

Sara Ducey
18
 

Progress: Who's Affected?

Students often understand that technological innovation makes our lives better, but they do not see the backstory. There are people who lose their livelihoods as machines replace them. What was once a necessary job is now obsolete--even the people themselves might feel obsolete. This lesson is designed to help students understand the drawbacks of progress and, more specifically, how it affects those people who were replaced.

#SAAMteach

Madison Doss
9
 

Primary Sources - Objects

Pictures of objects for students to analyze as part of a primary source unit using Project Zero Thinking Routines.  This is part of a large three year enrichment plan which focuses on what is a primary source in 4th grade, a family connected research project based upon primary sources in 5th grade, and finally creating a National History Day project in 6th grade.

Susan Mellon
10
 

Preventing the Dodo: Unveiling Animal Conservation Stories

What stories do the animals on the American Trail at the Smithsonian's National Zoo tell? Students will use the Project Zero Global Thinking Routine Unveiling Stories to uncover and consider the complexity around conservation. I asked students to consider more than just what is the initial story. I wanted to know what they thought the human and world stories might be. With the success of these animals I wanted students to also consider what the new and untold stories that might remain. The Unveiling Stories thinking routine is a great way to explore the complicated stories of the gray wolf, bald eagle, beaver,  North American river otter, and wood duck. #goglobal

Ellen Rogers
39
 

President and Mrs. Obama Portrait Unveiling

On February 12, 2018, the official portraits of President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama were unveiled at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. President Obama's portrait was created by artist Kehinde Wiley, who is known for his vibrant, large-scale paintings of African Americans posing as famous figures from the history of Western art. This portrait does not include an underlying art historical reference, but some of the flowers in the background carry special meaning for Obama. Mrs. Obama's portrait was created by artist Amy Sherald, who considers the former first lady to be someone “women can relate to—no matter what shape, size, race, or color. . . . We see our best selves in her.” 

This collection includes the two portraits, in high resolution, so that learners can zoom in and out to carefully observe details. It also includes videos and articles about the portraits and their official unveilings. Additional supports include other works by the two artists and strategies for reading portraits. Portraits of the two sitters and other presidential portraits can be used for compare and contrast activities. 

Ashley Naranjo
36
 

Portraiture and the Rhetorical Triangle

Subject: AP Language, Rhetorical Analysis

This collection features portraits (some that can be used for comparing and contrasting) for studying and practicing usage of the rhetorical triangle.  Students may also SOAPSTone the images.  

Objectives:

  • Students will observe different portraits.
  • Students will analyze different portraits using the rhetorical triangle.  
  • Students will recall lessons from history to apply background knowledge to the analysis.  

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.  

#NPGTeach



Mai Khanh Nguyen
16
 

Poetry and Drawing: The Art of Wifredo Lam #latinohac

This inquiry and technology-based lesson focuses on the art

of Cuban artist Wifredo Lam and the diverse artistic styles

from Europe and Africa that were present in his art. The

lesson connects art activities to skills and strategies in

technology, reading, and writing. #latinohac

Alina Rodriguez
14
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