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Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (6 of 12): Meteghlluwaaghet (Bird Carvings for Game)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Twining Cedar (9 of 15): Weaving a Twined Bottom

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Sculpting Ivory (5 of 17): Meet the Students

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Walrus ivory is a precious sculptural material that for millennia has been carved into a nearly endless variety of forms essential to Arctic life, from harpoon heads to needle cases, handles, ornaments, buckles and many more. Naturalistic and stylized figures of animals and humans were made as charms, amulets and ancestral representations. Carvers today bring this conceptual heritage to new types of work. During a week-long residency organized by the Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in 2015, Alaska Native carvers Jerome Saclamana (Iñupiaq), Clifford Apatiki (St. Lawrence Island Yupik) and Levi Tetpon (Iñupiaq) studied historic ivory pieces from the Smithsonian’s Living Our Cultures exhibition and Anchorage Museum collection, and demonstrated how to process, design and shape walrus ivory into artwork. Art students, museum conservators, school groups, local artists and museum visitors participated throughout the week. Also, a two-day community workshop in Nome was taught by Jerome Saclamana and hosted by the Nome-Beltz High School. The educational videos presented here introduce the artists and document the materials, tools and techniques they use to make ivory artwork. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the exhibition website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you can also find educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (11 of 15): Weaving the Sides

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Listen & Learn Iñupiaq (3 of 6): Nauligaq, Unaaq (Harpoon)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center hosted a language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in 2011, bringing together eight fluent Iñupiaq speakers for four days to discuss cultural heritage objects from their region in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. These videos present a range of information about life in northwest Alaska for the Iñupiaq people: hunting tools used for living from the land and sea to ceremonial items used at celebrations and gatherings to everyday clothing to cultural traditions and values. The videos are in Iñupiaq with subtitles in English and Iñupiaq, for following along in both languages. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Athabascan Moosehide Tanning & Sewing (15 of 23): Stretching, Scraping and Softening

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Older generations of Alaska Athabascan (Dene) peoples tanned moose hides using time-tested methods to make strong, supple leather for sewing beaded or quill-embroidered tunics, jackets, mittens, bags and moccasins, as well as everyday essentials such as dogsled harnesses. Because traditional tanning is time-consuming and requires technical knowledge that has declined in recent generations, most moose hides are now sent out to commercial tanneries for processing with synthetic chemicals. Commercial tanning produces a lower quality hide, but more importantly, it displaces the passing on of Athabascan tanning knowledge. Recognizing this, contemporary artists Joel Isaak (Dena'ina Athabascan) and Melissa Shaginoff (Ahtna Athabascan) have been learning traditional methods for tanning moose hides from elders Helen Dick (Dena’ina Athabascan) and Jeanie Maxim (Ahtna Athabascan) and adding tested, contemporary tools. The Alaska office of the Arctic Studies Center worked with these committed artists and elders from September 2017 through June 2018 to carry out moosehide tanning work in communities and backyards in Kenai, Chickaloon, and Anchorage, and a sewing and beading residency at the Anchorage Museum. The collaboration resulted in the set of twenty-three educational videos presented here. A limited number of free DVDs are available upon request to Biddisond@si.edu or Crowella@si.edu. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the exhibition website Sharing Knowledge: Alaska Native Collections at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you can also find educational materials in the Resources section.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (7 of 12): Atkuk (Parka)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Athabascan Moosehide Tanning & Sewing (6 of 23): Tools

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Older generations of Alaska Athabascan (Dene) peoples tanned moose hides using time-tested methods to make strong, supple leather for sewing beaded or quill-embroidered tunics, jackets, mittens, bags and moccasins, as well as everyday essentials such as dogsled harnesses. Because traditional tanning is time-consuming and requires technical knowledge that has declined in recent generations, most moose hides are now sent out to commercial tanneries for processing with synthetic chemicals. Commercial tanning produces a lower quality hide, but more importantly, it displaces the passing on of Athabascan tanning knowledge. Recognizing this, contemporary artists Joel Isaak (Dena'ina Athabascan) and Melissa Shaginoff (Ahtna Athabascan) have been learning traditional methods for tanning moose hides from elders Helen Dick (Dena’ina Athabascan) and Jeanie Maxim (Ahtna Athabascan) and adding tested, contemporary tools. The Alaska office of the Arctic Studies Center worked with these committed artists and elders from September 2017 through June 2018 to carry out moosehide tanning work in communities and backyards in Kenai, Chickaloon, and Anchorage, and a sewing and beading residency at the Anchorage Museum. The collaboration resulted in the set of twenty-three educational videos presented here. A limited number of free DVDs are available upon request to Biddisond@si.edu or Crowella@si.edu. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the exhibition website Sharing Knowledge: Alaska Native Collections at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you can also find educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (5 of 15): Preparing Red Cedar Bark

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (6 of 15): Harvesting and Preparing Maidenhair Fern

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
In 1994, the Anchorage Museum became the Alaska home of the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center. Its exhibition Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska presents Indigenous voices, perspectives and knowledge through over 600 masterworks of Alaska Native art and design from the National Museum of Natural History and National Museum of the American Indian collections. Living Our Cultures serves as both a public exhibition and as an active resource for collaborative, community-based research and education. These programs have included artist residencies and language seminars with Alaska Native elders, culture-bearers and artists. The videos on this channel, filmed and edited from these programs, provide instructional and educational information about Alaska Native languages, arts and lifeways. Free DVD copies and teacher's guides with lessons and worksheets are available: please contact Dawn Biddison at biddisond@si.edu. Video music: Dance songs by Joe Sikvayunak; Barrow, 1954; courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways

Aleutian Islands Bentwood Hats (8 of 9): How-to Steps 9 - 12

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Unangax men of the Aleutian Islands wore hunting hats and visors that were shaped from carved, boiled and bent planks of driftwood, intricately ornamented with painted lines and spirals, glass beads, walrus ivory figures and sea lion whiskers. These magnificent hats were practical headgear for kayak hunters and at the same time works of art that vividly expressed the spiritual connection between people and the creatures of the sea. Two contemporary Unangax hat makers – Patricia Lekanoff-Gregory and Michael Livingston – spent a week in 2012 as artists-in-residence at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage, working with advanced apprentices Delores Gregory and Tim Shangin. They examined bentwood hats and visors in the Living Our Cultures exhibition and Anchorage Museum collection, and they demonstrated carving, bending, and decorative techniques to visiting students and the museum public. The videos presented here, filmed during the residency, provide step-by-step instructions on how to make a bentwood hat and information on the use and significance of these hats in the past and today to the peoples of the Aleutian Islands. There are also in-depth interviews with the artists and apprentices, providing first-hand information about the Aleutian Islands region and this important art form. To learn more about Unangax culture, please visit the exhibition website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Sewing Salmon 2 (of 10): Audrey Armstrong's Method

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Sewing Salmon project – hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska – brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists to learn and teach about creating work from fish skin through studying historic fishskin objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. For free curriculum on salmon in Alaska, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Athabascan Moosehide Tanning & Sewing (11 of 23): Wringing and Washing a Cleaned Moose Hide

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Older generations of Alaska Athabascan (Dene) peoples tanned moose hides using time-tested methods to make strong, supple leather for sewing beaded or quill-embroidered tunics, jackets, mittens, bags and moccasins, as well as everyday essentials such as dogsled harnesses. Because traditional tanning is time-consuming and requires technical knowledge that has declined in recent generations, most moose hides are now sent out to commercial tanneries for processing with synthetic chemicals. Commercial tanning produces a lower quality hide, but more importantly, it displaces the passing on of Athabascan tanning knowledge. Recognizing this, contemporary artists Joel Isaak (Dena'ina Athabascan) and Melissa Shaginoff (Ahtna Athabascan) have been learning traditional methods for tanning moose hides from elders Helen Dick (Dena’ina Athabascan) and Jeanie Maxim (Ahtna Athabascan) and adding tested, contemporary tools. The Alaska office of the Arctic Studies Center worked with these committed artists and elders from September 2017 through June 2018 to carry out moosehide tanning work in communities and backyards in Kenai, Chickaloon, and Anchorage, and a sewing and beading residency at the Anchorage Museum. The collaboration resulted in the set of twenty-three educational videos presented here. A limited number of free DVDs are available upon request to Biddisond@si.edu or Crowella@si.edu. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the exhibition website Sharing Knowledge: Alaska Native Collections at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you can also find educational materials in the Resources section.

Creating Quillwork 8 (of 8): Meet the Conservators

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
During the Dene Quill Art project, two Athabascan artists and an ethnographic conservator shared quillwork techniques and develop new ones by studying historic museum objects. They shared their expertise with students, conservators and museum visitors. These educational videos provide detailed demonstrations of how to work with quill from cleaning and dying, to sewing, wrapping folding and weaving. For free curriculum on Athabascan peoples, including lessons with answers fro teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Athabascan culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Listen & Learn Iñupiaq (5 of 6): Qiḷaun, Sauyaq (Drum)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center hosted a language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in 2011, bringing together eight fluent Iñupiaq speakers for four days to discuss cultural heritage objects from their region in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. These videos present a range of information about life in northwest Alaska for the Iñupiaq people: hunting tools used for living from the land and sea to ceremonial items used at celebrations and gatherings to everyday clothing to cultural traditions and values. The videos are in Iñupiaq with subtitles in English and Iñupiaq, for following along in both languages. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Athabascan Moosehide Tanning & Sewing (22 of 23): Ahtna and Dena'ina Athabascan Vocabulary

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Older generations of Alaska Athabascan (Dene) peoples tanned moose hides using time-tested methods to make strong, supple leather for sewing beaded or quill-embroidered tunics, jackets, mittens, bags and moccasins, as well as everyday essentials such as dogsled harnesses. Because traditional tanning is time-consuming and requires technical knowledge that has declined in recent generations, most moose hides are now sent out to commercial tanneries for processing with synthetic chemicals. Commercial tanning produces a lower quality hide, but more importantly, it displaces the passing on of Athabascan tanning knowledge. Recognizing this, contemporary artists Joel Isaak (Dena'ina Athabascan) and Melissa Shaginoff (Ahtna Athabascan) have been learning traditional methods for tanning moose hides from elders Helen Dick (Dena’ina Athabascan) and Jeanie Maxim (Ahtna Athabascan) and adding tested, contemporary tools. The Alaska office of the Arctic Studies Center worked with these committed artists and elders from September 2017 through June 2018 to carry out moosehide tanning work in communities and backyards in Kenai, Chickaloon, and Anchorage, and a sewing and beading residency at the Anchorage Museum. The collaboration resulted in the set of twenty-three educational videos presented here. A limited number of free DVDs are available upon request to Biddisond@si.edu or Crowella@si.edu. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the exhibition website Sharing Knowledge: Alaska Native Collections at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you can also find educational materials in the Resources section.

Footage of the Falks' travel in Asia, reel 1, 1937

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
The Falks took one of the inaugural Pan Am Clipper flights to China in 1937. Myron S. (Johnny) Falk Jr., and his wife Pauline Baerwald Falk were active philanthropists, prominent Asian art collectors and were both active in the Jewish and Art communities.

0:00 - 0:39: Alameda Airport, boarding the Philippine Clipper (March 24-25); 0:39 - 0:49: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (March 26); 0:49 - 2:49: 1. Pan American Airways Hotel at Midway / Wake Island (March 27-30); 2:49 - 4:34: Military parade of soldiers and children, Guam (March 31); 4:24 - 4:52: Manila (April 1); 4:55 - 5:47: Xiamen (April 5); 5:47 - 6:30: Hong Kong Harbor, on the boat to Kowloon (April 6); 6:30 - 6:38: Ruins of St. Paul's in Macau (April 8); 6:38 - 6:42: ? 6:42 - 7:04: Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall, Guangzhou (April 10-11); 7:04 - 7:32: Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall or Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou; 7:32 - 7:36: Hills outside of Guangzhou (April 10-12); 7:36 - 7:41: ? 7:41 - 8:09: Train from Guangzhou to Wubei on Hangkow Railroad (April 12); 8:09 - 8:11: Locals somewhere near train station between Guangzhou and Wubei (April 12); 8:12 - 8:20: Viewing Temple of the Six Banyan Trees from a distance, railroad stations along Hangkow RR (April 12); 8:20 - 8:33: Wuhan, along the Yangtze. Perhaps taken from the Chinese Customs House (April 12); 8:33 - 8:44: Nina & George Blowers, Hankou (April 13); 8:44 - 8:57: Hangkow Country Club (April 14); 8:57 - 9:06: Spectators in Hankou watching plane departure (April 15); 9:06 - 10:43: Pilot Hugh Chen preparing to fly a small Loening, views of Hankou port, Standard Oil Company, men carrying gasoline barrels (April 15); 10:43 - 11:30: Airport in Shasi District of Jingzhou, watching planes land and take off (April 15); 11:30 - 12:30: Crossing Yangtze river at Chongqing, looking out onto the mountains (April 16); 12:30 - 14:52: Taking "chairs" up into Chongqing hillside, looking out onto the hills, visited temple with many graves, looked down at Yangzi and Chongqing industry (April 16); 14:52 - 15:16: "Mr. Hamburger" or "Mr. Reuss" and Falks in Chongqing, home of a K.Z. Yang (April 17); 15:16 - 16:13: Crossing Yangzi in Chongqing on the way to Shanghai (April 17)

Gift of the Falk Family.

One of four reels 16mm motion picture film taken during Johnny and Pauline Falk's 1937 trip to China, Korea and Japan. Kodak had only recently made color film available, so this may be the earliest color footage of many of the locations the Falks visited.

广州 厦门 汉口重庆

Footage of the Falks' travel in Asia, reel 2, 1937

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
The Falks took one of the inaugural Pan Am Clipper flights to China in 1937. Myron S. (Johnny) Falk Jr., and his wife Pauline Baerwald Falk were active philanthropists, prominent Asian art collectors and were both active in the Jewish and Art communities.

0:00 - 1:16: Landing at Shanghai airport, met by "Mr. Chung's car" (April 17); 1:17 - 1:52: Shanghai Harbor, ferry crossing the water, Mrs. Falk and K.C. Chung (April 17); 1:52 - 2:13: riding up "dike road" to Hangzhou from Shanghai with K.C. Chung (April 20); 2:13 - 2:24: Heavy rainfall on the sightseeing tour in Hangzhou, tea at the "largest temple in grove" (April 21); 2:24 - 3:37: Hangzhou, walking along the dike road that cuts off a part of the lake (April 21); 3:37 - 3:43: Huanglong Cave ("Grotto of Yellow Dragon"); in Hunan (April 22); 3:34 - 3:53: Winter Palace (Beihai Park) Pavilion, White Dagoba, Beijing (April 27); 3:53 - 5:51: Forbidden City (April 28-29); 3:51 - 6:11: Scenes from the train from Beijing to Hankou (April 30); 6:11 - 7:38: Donkey ride up to Great Wall from the Hankou pass (April 30); 7:38 - 8:11: Ming Tombs and stone elephant, Beijing (April 30); 8:11 - 8:41: Funeral procession, Beijing (April 30/May 1); 8:41 - 8:50: Duobao Glazed Tile Pagoda, Summer Palace, Beijing (May 1); 8:50 - 9:04: Summer Palace (May 1); 9:04 - 9:55: The Pagoda of Buddhist Virtue with KC Chung and his mother, Summer Palace, Beijing (May 1); 9:55 - 10:07: Summer Palace, Archway, bronze male lions (May 1); 10:08 - 10:14: Pagoda of Buddhist Virtue (May 1); 10:14 - 10:24: Viewing Pagoda of Buddhist Virtue from boat (Unknown date, likely May 1-7); 10:30 - 10:39: Banbi Bridge, Summer Palace (May 7); 10:39 - 10:55: Hall of the Sea of Wisdom, Summer Palace (May 7); 10:56 - 11:01: In the Summer Palace grounds (May 7); 11:01 - 11:12: Duobao Glazed Tile Pagoda, Summer Palace (May 7); 11:12 - 11:15: Detail of dragon head on Summer Palace roof (May 7); 11:15 - 11:21: Stupa, Summer Palace (May 7); 11:21 - 11:26: Bronze lion, Summer Palace (May 7); 11:26 - 11:32: Mrs. Falk and (likely) Mrs. Finnell in the Summer Palace grounds (May 7); 11:32 - 11:41: Lama monument, Beijing (May 4); 11:41 - 12:09: Lama monument, bas reliefs from Lama tomb (May 4); 12:09 - 13:32: Scenes from the Temple of Confucius, Beijing (May 4); 13:32 - 14:32: Nine Dragon Screen, Beihai Park, Beijing (April 27)

Gift of the Falk Family.

One of four reels 16mm motion picture film taken during Johnny and Pauline Falk's 1937 trip to China, Korea and Japan. Kodak had only recently made color film available, so this may be the earliest color footage of many of the locations the Falks visited.

上海 杭州 北京

Footage of the Falks' travel in Asia, reel 3, 1937

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
The Falks took one of the inaugural Pan Am Clipper flights to China in 1937. Myron S. (Johnny) Falk Jr., and his wife Pauline Baerwald Falk were active philanthropists, prominent Asian art collectors and were both active in the Jewish and Art communities.

0:00 - 0:42: Sedan chairs and donkey ride in Western Hills (April 25); 0:42 - 1:40: "Feast Day of first Yuan Emperor" festival and procession, Western Hills (April 25); 1:40 - 1:46: unknown woman and elderly man at the "Mummy Temple" in Western Hills (April 25); 1:46 - 2:38: "Mummy Temple" in Western Hills (April 25); 2:38 - 4:02: Continued procession, sedan chair and donkey rides in Western Hills (April 25); 4:02 - 4:14: Forbidden City, Beijing (April 27); 4:14 - 5:03: Temple of Heaven, Beijing (April 27); 5:03 - 5:15: Mrs. Falk and friends at the Temple of Heaven, Beijing (April 27); 5:15 - 5:59: Temple of Heaven, Beijing (April 27); 5:59 - 6:06: Putuo Zongcheng Temple, Chengde (May 11); 6:06 - 6:28: Puning Temple, Chengde (May 11); 6:28 - 7:36: Puning Temple, unknown statues, Chengde (May 11); 7:36 - 7:40: Xumifushou Temple (Temple of Happiness and Longevity of the Sumeru Mountain, Chengde (May 11); 7:40 - 8:10: Liuli-Wanshou pagoda (Glazed Tile Pagoda of Longevity) Xumifushou Temple, Chengde (May 11); 8:10 - 9:17: Putuo Zongcheng Temple, Chengde; (May 11); 9:17 - 9:33: Main hall of the Putuo Zongcheng temple surrounding Wanfaguiyi Hall, Chengde (May 11); 9:33 - 9:40: Looking down at the Sarira Pagoda, Chengde (May 11); 9:40 - 10:02: Corner pavilion of Wanfaguiyi, Putoh Zongcheng Temple, Chengde (May 11); 10:02 - 10:54: Putuo Zongcheng Temple, Chengde (May 11); 10:54 - Villagers in Chengde, ruins 11:30 - 11:47: Sarira Pagoda at Chengde Mountain Resort (May 11); 11:47 - 11:55: Mrs. Falk and friends (May 11)

Gift of the Falk Family.

One of four reels 16mm motion picture film taken during Johnny and Pauline Falk's 1937 trip to China, Korea and Japan. Kodak had only recently made color film available, so this may be the earliest color footage of many of the locations the Falks visited.

北京 承德 热河

Footage of the Falks' travel in Asia, reel 4, 1937

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
The Falks took one of the inaugural Pan Am Clipper flights to China in 1937. Myron S. (Johnny) Falk Jr., and his wife Pauline Baerwald Falk were active philanthropists, prominent Asian art collectors and were both active in the Jewish and Art communities.

0:00 - 1:08: Qing Tombs, Shenyang (May 14); 1:08 - 1:33: Injeongjeon Hall, Changdeokgung Palace, Seoul, Peony gardens and another building - not sure exactly which building within the palace (May 15); 1:33 - 1:48: Wongaksa Pagoda at Tapgol Park, Seoul (May 15); 1:48 - 2:00: Gyeonghoeru Pavilion, Gyeongbokgung Palace (May 16); 2:00 - 2:06: Gyeongbokgung Palace, Seoul (May 16); 2:06 - 2:11: Yasaka Shrine OR Kamigamo Shrine, Kyoto (May 18); 2:11 - 2:22: Kyoto Schoolchildren (May 18-19); 2:22 - 2:25: Horyu-ji temple, Nara (May 19); 2:25 - 4:01: Riding on the rapids of the Hozugawa River, Kyoto (May 20); 4:01 - 6:00: Nikko Tosho-gu, Nikko, Japan (May 23); 6:00 - 8:09: Daibutsu, Kamakura, Japan (May); 8:09 - 9:29: Unknown residence, perhaps "Ernst and the children" as mentioned in the diary, likely in Kyoto (May 21); 9:29 - 11:40: Unknown ryokan or the Miyako Hotel in Kyoto (date unknown); 11:40 - 12:00: Mrs. Falk and unknown friends appearing to be on board a ship (date unknown)

Gift of the Falk Family.

One of four reels 16mm motion picture film taken during Johnny and Pauline Falk's 1937 trip to China, Korea and Japan. Kodak had only recently made color film available, so this may be the earliest color footage of many of the locations the Falks visited.

沈阳 京都 日光 鎌倉

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