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Michelle Obama, First Lady of the United States, on Giant Panda Cub Naming

National Zoo
Mrs. Michelle Obama, First Lady of the United States, shares her congratulations on the naming of the Smithsonian's National Zoo's giant panda cub, born on August 23, 2013.

Help Name the Kiwi Chick!

National Zoo
The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute's newest female brown kiwi chick needs a name and you can help! Click here to participate: https://nationalzoo.si.edu/animals/name-kiwi-chick

Saving Coral: The Large Reef Tank

National Zoo
The Great Barrier Reef is an iconic part of Australia. It's also important to the ecology and economics, not only of Australia, but of the whole world. SCBI's Dr. Hagedorn and her team traveled to the Australian Institute of Marine Science to help conserve this vital marine ecosystem.

Smithsonian's National Zoo's Giant Panda Cub is A Girl!

National Zoo
It's a girl! SCBI's Center for Conservation and Evolutionary genetics confirmed that our panda cub is a girl! Further, the paternity analysis shows that her father is Tian Tian.The scientists also analyzed the second, stillborn cub. That cub was also a girl, and also Tian Tian's. The cubs were fraternal twins.

Timelapse Video of Giant Panda Mei Xiang's Den

National Zoo
Giant panda Mei Xiang at Smithsonian's National Zoo built a nest leading up to the birth of her cub. A camera in the den caught sporadic images over that time, resulting in this video. Pandas that experience either a pregnancy or a pseudo-pregnancy build nests in preparation for birth.

Did You Know: The U.S. is Home to More Species of Salamander Than Any Other Country?

National Zoo
Oct. 16, 2015—Of the estimated 600 salamander species in the world, one-third are found in the United States—half of which live in Appalachia. The area’s cool streams and shaded forests provide the ideal climate for salamanders, which need moisture to survive. Learn more about these secretive creatures online and join us for the Oct. 17 opening of our new Jewels of Appalachia exhibit in the Reptile Discovery Center. #WeSaveSpecies

Removing Invasive Species from Ballast Water

Office of Public Affairs
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center Marine Biologist George Smith discusses how scientists are trying to prevent invasive species from hitching a ride to new ecosystems aboard ships.

Smithsonian geophysicist Bruce Campbell explains how to make radar map of the Moon

Office of Public Affairs
Dr. Bruce Campbell, a geophysicist at the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, is at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, W. Va., to make a radar map of the Moon. In this video, made in September 2009, Dr. Campbell explains some of the work involved in putting together a detailed radar map of the Moon.

Parrot snake attacks red-eyed treefrog egg clutch

Office of Public Affairs
This infrared video recording shows a parrot snake (Leptophis ahaetulla) attacking a red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis calidryas) egg clutch. Some of the treefrog embryos escape the snake by hatching early. This video was taken by Dr. Karen Warkentin of Boston University and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. You can learn more at the Web site: people.bu.edu/kwarken/

3D scan of a Clovis stone projectile point

Office of Public Affairs
This video was created by Dr. Sabrina Sholts of the Human Evolution Research Center at the University of California in Berkeley using 3D digital scans of a Clovis stone projectile point from the collections of the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Scans of Clovis stone points from the Smithsonian were the subject of the scientific paper "Flake scar patterns of Clovis points analyzed with a new digital morphometrics approach: Evidence for direct transmissions of technological knowledge across early North America," in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science, May 2012.

Ecosystems on the Edge: Low Oxygen

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Oysters have been hard hit by overfishing and poaching. Now they have another enemy: low-oxygen "dead zones" that emerge in shallow waters at night. Smithsonian biologist Denise Breitburg explains how even just a few hours with near-zero oxygen levels can leave them vulnerable to parasites and disease. View more Ecosystems on the Edge videos and learn how you can help at http://ecosystems.serc.si.edu. Created by the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.

Ecosystems on the Edge: Ultraviolet Water

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
If a supernova vaporized Earth's ozone layer, what would happen to life in the ocean? Smithsonian biologist Pat Neale shows how UV rays could harm microscopic phytoplankton, the foundation of the entire marine food web. View more Ecosystems on the Edge videos and learn how you can help at http://ecosystems.serc.si.edu. Created by the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.

Plate Watch--2017 Citizen Science Newsletter

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
The Marine Invasions Lab researchers have been working with volunteers to track the movement of non-native marine invertebrates along the West Coast of the US and Canada. Citizen scientists deploy settlement plates—small PVC tiles that are zip tied to bricks to keep them underwater. Videos by Cosette Larash, Maria Sharova, Alison Cawood Music: Positive by AShamaluev https://www.youtube.com/user/AShamaluev/about

River Seining: Explore Smithsonian

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
What life is hiding beneath the clouded waters of Chesapeake Bay? While scientists have devised several high-tech ways to peer beneath the surface, they also rely on one tried and true method: dragging a giant seine net through the water and seeing what they catch! Marine biologist Stacey Havard of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center took TV host Josh Bernstein seining in the Rhode River, where they discovered the tiny creatures that can make a big difference for life in the Chesapeake.

Summer 2015 Interns at Work

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Interns at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center work in the field and in the lab to gain hands-on experience in terrestrial, atmospheric, and estuarine environmental research. Their work answers questions spanning the fields of ecology, biology, chemistry, microbiology, and physics. SERC also offers environmental education and science communication internships. Video created by summer 2015 education intern Josie Whelan. Music: Jack in the Box by Silent Partner.

Conserving Threatened Orchids: Smithsonian Bay Optimism Lecture Series

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Roughly 10 percent of the world’s plant species are orchids. However, of North America’s 200-plus orchid species, 1 in 4 are globally threatened and nearly all are threatened at the state or federal level. In this talk, Smithsonian ecologist Melissa McCormick unveils a hidden key to orchid survival: the underground orchid-fungus connection. You'll also discover how the North American Orchid Conservation Center is working to preserve all the native orchids on the continent. Part of the 2017 Bay Optimism lecture series at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. Opening Music: Dave Szesztay, "The Big Moment" https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ See more Bay Optimism talks at https://serc.si.edu/visit/free-evening-lectures

Seahorse Noodling

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Two lined seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, dubbed Mr. Ed and Flicka, perform a courtship dance in their aquarium. Seahorses are generally monogamous, mating with one partner for life. It's common practice for seahorse couples to do a courtship dance every morning, often changing color and intertwining their tails. And when it's time to have children, it's the male who gives birth. During mating, the female deposits hundreds of eggs into the male's brood pouch, where they're sheltered until he gives birth to them about three weeks later. It's thought this may have evolved as a way for the male to be certain he's the father. (Video: Karen McDonald/SERC)

Seagrass Resilience & Restoration: Smithsonian Bay Optimism Lecture Series

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Unless you've done some exploring, chances are you may have missed an amazing display that unfolds below the surface of the Chesapeake Bay. Despite their inconspicuous nature, underwater plants pack a punch for the health of aquatic ecosystems and protecting shorelines. They provide fish and shellfish habitat, buffer shorelines, and clean the water. In this presentation, University of Maryland ecologists Katia Engelhardt will take you on a tour of underwater grasses in the Chesapeake Bay, provide an overview of trends, and provide optimism (infused with a dose of caution) for their restoration, recovery and resilience. Part of the 2017 Bay Optimism lecture series at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. Opening Music: Dave Szesztay, "The Big Moment" https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ See more Bay Optimism talks at https://serc.si.edu/visit/free-evening-lectures

Making a Meta-Analysis

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
How meta-analyses help scientists answer big questions in research. Featuring SERC 2017 summer intern Zach Topor.

Camp Discovery

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Summer campers entering first and second grade discovered nature's wonders at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. They visited trails, wetlands, and meadows, met many different animals, played games, made arts and crafts, and learned how to be good stewards of the land and Chesapeake Bay. Video created by 2015 summer education intern Josie Whelan. Music: The Creek by Topher Mohr and Alex Elena.

Intro to Orchids in Classrooms

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Video by Samantha Snowden Acoustic/Folk Instrumental by Hyde Photos by Mark Rose, David McAdoo and Hal Horwitz

Marine Ecology--2017 Citizen Science Newsletter

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
The Marine & Estuarine Ecology Lab at SERC studies interactions among species and the ways that individual animals, communities and ecosystems respond to changes in the environment. Videos by Cosette Larash, Maria Sharova, Alison Cawood Music: Positive by AShamaluev https://www.youtube.com/user/AShamaluev/about

Ballast Water Sampling Time Lapse

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Smithsonian marine biologists Kim Holzer and Jenny Carney sample ballast water from a bulk cargo ship in Virginia. Large ships take on ballast water to remain stable during their voyages, but in the process they can inadvertently ferry invasive species as well. (Credit: Kim Holzer/Smithsonian Environmental Research Center) Learn more about invasive species at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC): https://serc.si.edu/research/research-topics/biological-invasions SERC Marine Invasions Lab Homepage: https://serc.si.edu/labs/marine-invasions-research

On-stage conversation with Pixar's Coco artists

Smithsonian Latino Center
On-stage Conversation with Ana Ramirez and Alonso Martinez from Pixar Animation Studios. 2018 Hispanic Heritage Month Family Festival at the National Museum of American History.
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