Skip to Content

Found 16,112 Resources

Day of the Dead: Dance of the Deer 2

National Museum of the American Indian
The local Maya-Mam culural organization, Grupo AWAL, perform the traditional Dance of the Deer, Baile del Venado, to the accompaniment of traditional instruments, including a Guatemalan marimba. A description of traditional Day of the Dead activites, including features of the altar, or offrenda, proceeds the performance. This is the second of two performances of the dance that was webcast from the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 1, 2014.

NNAVM: Presentation of Final Design Proposals 6—Harvey Pratt

National Museum of the American Indian
Harvey Pratt (Cheyenne/Arapaho) and his project partner Hans Butzer present their design proposal. Mr. Pratt, a multimedia artist, retired as the police forensic artist for the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation. Mr. Butzer is a partner in the Oklahoma firm Butzer Architects and Urbanism. In 2020, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian will dedicate the National Native American Veterans Memorial on the museum's grounds in Washington, D. C. After nearly two years of consultations with Native veterans and tribal communities to develop criteria, the museum held an open design competition. Through a blind process—proposals were identified only by number—a jury of Natives and non-Natives selected five final concepts earlier this year. The Presentation of Final Designs shown in this playlist offered the public the opportunity to hear memorial proposals from each design team and questions and comments from the jurors about each of the designs. In this segment, members of the jury introduce themselves: Mr. Larry Ulaaq Ahvakana (Inupiaq), artist; Ahvakana Fine Art; Ms. Stephanie Birdcall (Cherokee), director, Veteran Affairs, Office of Tribal Government Relations; Dr. Johnnetta Betsch Cole, director emerita, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution; Mr. Edwin Fountain, general counsel, American Battle Monuments Commission; Mr. Mark Kawika McKeague (Native Hawaiian), director of cultural planning, Group 70 International, Inc.; Mr. Brian McCormack (Nez Perce), principal landscape architect, McCormack Landscape Architecture; Ms. Lillian Pitt (Wasco/Yakima/Warm Springs), artist; Dr. Herman Viola, curator emeritus, Smithsonian Institution; and Mr. Kevin Grover (Pawnee), director of the National Museum of the American Indian (alternate juror). This program was webcast live and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 12, 2018.

Cherokee Days 2018 - Native American Flute by Tommy Wildcat

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum's fifth annual Cherokee Days Festival brings together members from the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes (Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) to celebrate and share their culture, history, and arts with the public. In this segment, Cherokee National Treasure Tommy Wildcat performs original and traditional tunes on the Native American Flute. This performance was webcast live and recorded on April 14, 2018 in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian.

Cherokee Days 2019 – Warriors of AniKituhwa 3

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum's sixth annual Cherokee Days Festival brings together members from the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes (Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) to celebrate and share their culture, history, and arts with the public. In this video, the Warriors of AniKituhwa perform traditional dances and invite audience members to join them in some of the dances. The Warriors are members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and and perform frequently in Cherokee, North Carolina. This performance was webcast and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on April 13, 2019.

Lessons in Toolmaking

National Museum of the American Indian
Tania Larsson (Tetlit Gwich’in and Swedish), a student at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe and 2015 participant in the Artist Leadership Program of the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), describes forging new tools modeled on 3D scans of tools in the museum's collections. She also shares the worst lesson she ever learned about caring for tools. (It involves a dog . . . .) The NMAI and the IAIA together have developed this opportunity for IAIA students within the museum's larger Artist Leadership Program. Selection for the program is coordinated with the IAIA and is based on students’ proposed research, public art projects, academic presentations, digital portfolios, resumes, artist statements, and letters of support from IAIA faculty. Participating students receive credit for independent study. Video production: Mats Reiniusson Academic dean, IAIA: Charlene Teters

Día de los Muertos Festival 2015 - Danza de los Viejitos 2

National Museum of the American Indian
As part of the museum's annual Day of the Dead festival, Grupo los Tecuanes perform La Danza de los Viejitos (Dance of the Ol Men) in the Potomac Atrium. This is the first day of performances by this Mixtec culture organization and took place on November 1, 2015.

Ancient Peoples, Modern Migration: Maya Migration and Sustaining Culture

National Museum of the American Indian
In this bilingual panel presentation, Maya and other indigenous cultural activists from Mesoamerica discuss the experience of retaining cultural traditions and identity as they negotiate life in the United States. The program is moderated by Jose Barreiro (Taíno), director of the Office for Latin America, National Museum of the American Indian. Panelists: Jeronimo Camposeco, a K’anjobal Maya from Guatemala now settled in Florida, has been instrumental in developing socio-cultural continuity and strategies of survival and well-being after political persecution and economic depression for the growing community of Maya refugees . Juanita Cabrera Lopez, a Mam Maya activist, is executive director of the International Mayan League, one several hundred Maya-based organizations in the United States. The Maya League's purpose is to conserve, protect, and transmit Maya culture, history, language, and vision for future generations of Maya people in the northern diaspora. Margarito Esquino, Nahuat from El Salvador, is chief of the National Association of Indigenous Salvadorans (ANIS), which represents Nahuat, Lenca, and Maya peoples of El Salvador. ANIS advocates for their members’ safety, well-being, and right to practice indigenous cultural traditions. Odilia de Leon, a migrant from the Nebaj–Quiche community of Guatemala, Odilia settled in the United States in 2014, where she works as a domestic. As a leader of the Centreville Labor Resource Center, she helps others in the quest to sustain cultural and social links in a diasporic situation. This program was webcast and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on September 16, 2016.

Northwest Coast Dance Celebration - Git Hayetsk 2

National Museum of the American Indian
As part of the museum's Native American Heritage Month Celebration of Northwest Coast Dance, internationally renowned West Coast First Nations mask-dancing group Git Hayetsk (People of the Copper Shield) from Vancouver B.C., present the dance traditions of the Sm’algyax speaking peoples of Southeast Alaska and Vancouver, British Columbia, which include the Nisga’a, Tsimshian, and Gitxsan Nations. Led by Mike and Mique'l Dangeli, the group brings to life the carved masks which are featured in many of the dances and continue their dance traditions into contemporary times. This is the second of three performances by People of the Copper Shield that was webcast and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 24, Thanksgiving day, 2016.

Hawaiian Cultural Festival 2019: Mele and Hula in Honor of Kamehameha 3

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum's annual Hawaiian Cultural festival this year celebrates the life and legacy of King Kamehameha – respected Native Hawaiian warrior, leader, and diplomat – who united the Hawaiian Islands into a royal kingdom in 1810. In this video, local Hawaiian cultural organization, Hā lau Ho‘omau I ka Wai Ola O Hawai‘i, perform mele (chants or songs) and hula (dance) to honor King Kamehameha I. This is the first of two performances by Hā lau Ho‘omau I ka Wai Ola O Hawai‘i recorded during the festival. It was webcast and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on May 19, 2019.

Native/American Fashion 9 | Adrienne Keene

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the first panelist to speak on the topic Problematics of Cultural Appropriation in Contemporary Fashion, Adrienne Keene of Brown University. Her talk is titled “Navajo” Underwear and Headdresses on the Runway: A Look at the Last Five Years of Cultural Appropriation in Fashion. Adrienne Keene (Cherokee Nation) is assistant professor of American Studies at Brown University. A Native scholar, writer, blogger, and activist, she is passionate about reframing how the world sees contemporary Native cultures. She is the creator and author of Native Appropriations, an internationally recognized blog discussing cultural appropriation and stereotypes of Native peoples in fashion, film, music, and other forms of pop culture. Through her writing and activism, Keene questions and problematizes the ways indigenous peoples are represented, asking for celebrities, large corporations, and designers to consider the ways they incorporate “Native” elements into their work. She is interested in the way Native peoples are using social and new media to challenge misrepresentations and present counter-narratives that showcase true Native cultures and identities. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Suma Qamaña 2014 Bolivian Festival 21: Andean Music

National Museum of the American Indian
Suma Qamaña celebrates the spirit of "Living Well" in this four day festival hosted by the Embassy of the Plurinational State of Bolivia, highlighting the indigenous cultures of Bolivia through dance and song. In this segment, C.E.C K'hantati Los Andes perform music from the Andean region of Bolivia. Recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 8, 2014.

Cherokee Days 2018 - Cherokee Traditional Dances

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum's fifth annual Cherokee Days Festival brings together members from the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes (Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) to celebrate and share their culture, history, and arts with the public. In this segment, the Tsa-La-Gi Group of the Eastern Band of Cherokee demonstrate some traditional animal dances of the Cherokee. This performance was webcast live and recorded on April 14, 2018 in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian.

Cherokee Days 2018 - Cherokee National Youth Choir

National Museum of the American Indian
The Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian's fifth annual Cherokee Days Festival brings together members from the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes (Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) to celebrate and share their culture, history, and arts with the public. In this segment, the Cherokee National Youth Choir perform songs in the Cherokee language. This performance was webcast live and recorded on April 14, 2018 in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian.

Out of Many Festival 2017 - Mark Rooney Taiko Drumming 1

National Museum of the American Indian
Out of Many Festival: A Winter Multicultural Presentation of Music and Dance celebrates the cultural diversity of the United States through expressive performances. In this segment, Mark H. Rooney, drumming instructor, and Kristen Koyama give performances on traditional Japanese drums, or Taiko. This is the first of two performances that they gave in the festival. This performance was webcast live and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on January 22, 2017.

Día de los Muertos/Day of the Dead 2018 - Dance of the Jaguar 1

National Museum of the American Indian
As in years past, the Smithsonian Latino Center teamed up with the National Museum of the American Indian to celebrate the rich cultural heritage represented in the celebration of Día de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead. In this segment, the local Mixtec culture organization, Grupo Los Tecuanes, perform the traditional dance, Danza de los Tecuanes - Dance of the Jaguar, for the museum's annual Day of the Dead/Día de los Muertos celebration. This is the first of two performances of the dance performed on the second day of the festival. The program was webcast from the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on October 28, 2018.

Day of the Dead/Día de los Muertos 2016 - Dance of the Jaguar 1

National Museum of the American Indian
As in years past, the Smithsonian Latino Center teamed up with the National Museum of the American Indian to celebrate the rich cultural heritage represented in the celebration of Día de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead. In this segment, the local Mixtec culture organization, Grupo Los Tecuanes, perform the traditional dance, Danza de los Tecuanes - Dance of the Jaguar, for the museum's annual Day of the Dead/Día de los Muertos celebration. This is the first of two performances of the dance performed on the first day of the festival. The program was webcast from the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on October 29, 2016.

Farafina Kan - The Sound of Africa

National Museum of the American Indian
Farafina Kan literally translates to the sound of Africa. Farafina Kan is a professional West African Percussion Orchestra dedicated to maintaining the history and integrity of traditional African music. Under the tutelage of international performing arts legends, Farafina Kan seeks to sustain the work initiated by these legends through professionalism, artistry, continual learning and proactive intergenerational transmission of African culture through music and movement. Farafina Kan is a family comprised of young African-American artists reared in many of the dance companies who established the foundation for African dance in the US including but not limited to Memory of African Culture, Sankofa Dance Theatre. This performance took place on January 19, 2013 as part of the Out of Many multicultural festival of music, dance, and story.

A Promise Kept: 11 – Wilson Pipestem, Esq.

National Museum of the American Indian
Influential policy advocate, writer, curator, and 2014 recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne and Hodulgee Muscogee) is recognized for a lifetime of achievement in this symposium, “A Promise Kept: The Inspiring Life and Works of Suzan Shown Harjo.” A founding trustee of the National Museum of the American Indian, Harjo’s legacy of activism and artistic accomplishment continues to inspire Native Nations and people and influence U.S. policies about Native sovereignty and cultures. In this segment, Wilson Pipestem, Esq., Founding Partner, Pipestem Law, P.C., speaks on "Unmasking Native Personhood Beyond Sovereign Boundaries." Wilson Pipestem is a founder of Pipestem Law and Ietan Consulting, law and advocacy firms that protect the rights of tribal governments and American Indians. He represents and advises tribal governments on a range of issues from treaty rights to minerals production to gaming. Advocating before Congress and federal administrative agencies, Pipestem helps tribes reacquire lands lost as the result of misguided federal policies through both congressional enactment and administrative decision. In 2013, Wilson played a prominent role in the enactment of the Violence Against Women Act reauthorization that reaffirms the inherent sovereign rights of tribal courts to exercise criminal jurisdiction over all persons who commit domestic violence crimes against Native women. He is a citizen of the Cheyenne and Hodulgee Muscogee,activisim,Smithsonian,webcast,Otoe-Missouria Tribe,Osage,life achievement,symposium Headright Owner. The symposium was webcast and recorded in the National Museum of the American Indian Rasmuson Theater on September 20, 2019.

Cherokee Days 2019 – Traditional Dances 2

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum's sixth annual Cherokee Days Festival brings together members from the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes (Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) to celebrate and share their culture, history, and arts with the public. In this video, the Tsa-La-Gi touring group representing the Oconaluftee Indian Village in Cherokee, North Carolina perform traditional social dances, and welcome audience members to join them in a friendship dance. This performance was webcast and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on April 12, 2019.

Vistas and Dreams 6: Philip J. Deloria

National Museum of the American Indian
"Vistas and Dreams: Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Founding of the Museum of the American Indian" is a special symposium that marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the National Museum of the American Indian’s predecessor institution, the Museum of the American Indian (MAI), by George Gustav Heye (1874–1957). In this segment, Philip J. Deloria, University of Michigan, speaks on "Indians Loom Large: Indians and America at the Turn of the Century." PHILIP J. DELORIA (Standing Rock Sioux), who earned his PhD in American Studies at Yale University, is Carroll Smith-Rosenberg Collegiate Professor in the Departments of History and American Culture, and the Program in the Environment and the Program in Native American Studies. He is the author of Playing Indian (Yale University Press, 1998), Indians in Unexpected Places (Kansas, 2004), and co-editor (with Neal Salisbury) of The Blackwell Companion to American Indian History (2002) and (with Jerome Bernstein) co-editor of C.G. Jung and the Sioux Traditions: Dreams, Visions, Nature, and the Primitive by Vine Deloria Jr. (Spring Journal Press, 2009). Deloria is the former president of the American Studies Association, a former Trustee of the National Museum of the American Indian, and the author of numerous essays, articles, and reviews dealing with American cultural history, American Indian history, and American environmental history. The symposium was recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in the Alexander Hamilton U. S. Custom House in New York City on September 17, 2016.

LIving Earth Festival: The Pokagon Drum & Dance Troupe 2

National Museum of the American Indian
The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians Drum and Dance Troupe come to us from Dowagiac, MI. Enjoy this group as they demonstrate traditional and contemporary dancing offered at many powwows throughout the United States. Pokagon youth perform traditional drumming and singing to accompany the dances and the public is welcomed to join in on a couple of them. This the second of two performances by the troupe that were webcast from the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC on July 19, 2014.

Suma Qamaña 2014 Bolivian Festival 17: Kullawada

National Museum of the American Indian
Suma Qamaña celebrates the spirit of "Living Well" in this four day festival hosted by the Embassy of the Plurinational State of Bolivia, highlighting the indigenous cultures of Bolivia through dance and song. In this segment, Morenada Bolivia USA perform the Kullawada. This dance has its origins to pre-columbian times. Characteristic of the high plains, this dance represents the weavers and textile artisans who work with the llama wool. Such traditional practice was crucial for the economies of the Andean culture of the "Kollas". the outfits for both men and women are luxurious and they are full of detailed decorations. Additionally, both men and women wear a peculiar hat with pearls called kh'ara and a small secptre-like accessary called k'apu. Recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 8, 2014.

Rasmuson Theater Celebration Featuring Pamyua

National Museum of the American Indian
In celebration of 15 years of presentations by outstanding Native (and non-Native) thinkers and performers in the museum’s beautiful Rasmuson Theater, the Yup'ik music and dance group Pamyua perform. Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the National Museum of the American Indian introduces the evening event, the re-dedication of the Elmer and Mary Louise Rasmuson Theater. Also, to celebrate the newly refurbished theater, Roy Agloinga, Rasmuson Foundation Program Officer and senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska give some remarks. Brothers Stephen and Phillip Blanchett, of Yup’ik and African American descent, formed Pamyua in 1995, with traditional Yup’ik dancer and culture bearer Ossie Kairaiuak joining them in 1996. Revered across Europe and North America, Pamyua brings a unique style and contemporary twist to Yup’ik drum-dance songs. Experience the group’s special cultural harmony and learn more about Inuit culture through this celebration of one of the great cultural arts venues on the National Mall. This program was webcast and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 7, 2019.

Strong Women/Strong Nations 6: Panel 2, Tribal Governance

National Museum of the American Indian
"Strong Women/Strong Nations: Native American Women & Leadership" is a day-long symposium examining the complex identities of Native women through lively, insightful discussions by elected tribal leaders, activists, artists, and business leaders about the challenges, obstacles, and opportunities confronting women today. This segment features a panel entitled, "The Emergence of Women as Leaders in Tribal Governance." Native women are increasingly moving into leadership positions. This panel focuses on their experiences—and lessons learned for all women. It is moderated by Jodi Gillette (Standing Rock Sioux), Policy Advisor, Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry, LLP. The presenters include Kim Baird, Owner, Kim Baird Strategic Consulting; former Chief, Tsawwassen First Nation; Karen Diver, Special Assistant to the President for Native American Affairs, White House Domestic Policy Council; former Tribal Chairwoman, Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa; and Lynn Valbuena, Tribal Chairwoman, San Manuel Band of Mission Indians. Jodi A. Gillette (Standing Rock Sioux) is currently a Policy Advisor for Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry, LLP, after serving in the Administration of President Barack Obama from 2009-2015. During her tenure under the Administration, she served as the Special Assistant to the President for Native American Affairs in the White House Domestic Policy Council, as the Deputy Assistant Secretary to the Assistant- Secretary Indian Affairs in the U.S. Department of the Interior, and as the Associate Director of WOMEN NATIONS Native American Women & Leadership Intergovernmental Affairs at the White House. Gillette was influential in advising President Obama on policy to improve the lives of Native Americans and strengthen the nation-to-nation relationship between the United States and Indian Tribes, and advancing the protection of Native women and children against violence. Kim Baird (Tsawwassen First Nation) is the owner of Kim Baird Strategic Consulting and offers services in relation to First Nation policy, governance, and economic development issues. Baird was the elected Chief of the Tsawwassen First Nation for six terms, from 1999-2012. She had the honor of negotiating and implementing British Columbia’s first urban treaty on April 3, 2009, and has since overseen numerous economic and institutional development projects for TFN. The recipient of a number of prestigious awards, Baird has been appointed to the Premier’s Aboriginal Business Investment Council and the Minister’s Advisory Council on Aboriginal Women. She is a trustee for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. Karen Diver (Chippewa) is Special Assistant to the President for Native American Affairs, White House Domestic Policy Council. In addition to serving as Chairwoman of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa for more than eight years, Diver also served as Vice President of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe; a member of the Board of Directors for the Corporation for Supportive Housing; a two-term Chair of the Boards of the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits and the Women’s Foundation of Minnesota; and a Presidential appointee to the State, Local, and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resiliency. Diver has a bachelor’s degree in Economics from the University of Minnesota, Duluth, and a Master in Public Administration from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Lynn Valbuena is Chairwoman of the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians in Southern California. She has held numerous elected positions within the tribal government, including past terms as Chairwoman, Vice Chairwoman, and member of the Business Committee, which manages daily governmental operations on behalf of the General Council. She believes in community outreach, involvement with local organizations, and creating awareness of tribal traditions. In addition to her tribal government duties, Lynn is the chairwoman of the Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations, a coalition of tribes in California, and was an elected officer for the National Indian Gaming Association. She is a trustee for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian and the Los Angeles-based Autry National Center. In 2015, Valbuena was inducted into the American Gaming Association’s Gaming Hall of Fame. The symposium was webcast and recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on March 18, 2016.
14689-14712 of 16,112 Resources