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Life in One Cubic Foot - exploring biodiversity with biocubes

National Museum of Natural History
At the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Sant Ocean Hall Focus Gallery beginning March 4, 2016. What can we discover in just a cubic foot of Earth? As it turns out, a whole lot! Biocubes—the life in a cubic foot of soil or water over one day—capture enough variation to explore the complexity of entire ecosystems. Through this interactive exhibition, enter the small worlds of biocuces with Smithsonian researchers and other scientists as they investigate a range of marine biocubes to uncover amazingly complex relationships and important lessons for the future of our planet. Learn more at: https://ocean.si.edu/biocubes

How do we know whether dinosaurs cared for their young?

National Museum of Natural History
How do scientists use different kinds of data, such as fossilized nests and trackways, to understand dinosaur reproduction and parenting?

Skin & Bones - Animal Life: Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

National Museum of Natural History
The Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake is the largest rattlesnakes in the world and with one bite can deliver a potent venom that dispatches their prey. This video is one of a series taken from the mobile app Skin & Bones. The app brings animal skeletons to life through 3D imagery in the Bone Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Download on the App Store and enjoy the videos and 3D experience at the Museum or wherever you are.

Unearthing Fossil Whales with Nick Pyenson

National Museum of Natural History
Join paleontologist Nick Pyenson in uncovering fossil whales in Panama, Canada, and Chile and probing their evolutionary mysteries using 3D laser scanning technology. Aired Jan. 16, 2014.

Sharing St. Lawrence Island Yupik Language and Culture

National Museum of Natural History
The Alaska Office of the Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers: John Apassingok, Lydia Apatiki, Ralph Apatiki, Sr., Elaine Kingeekuk, Christopher Koonooka, Merlin Koonooka and Angela Larson. They met for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Smithsonian exhibition Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska at the Anchorage Museum. The resulting twelve short videos and lessons offer teachers, students, parents and lifelong learners access to Yupik language and lifeways. One of those videos – saguyak (drum) – is presented here. To see all of the videos and lessons, please visit the project microsite at Sharing Knowledge Alaska: http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/sharing-knowledge-alaska/SharingknowledgeAK_Index.html

Oxygen Theatre

National Museum of Natural History
© Smithsonian Institution You, like all aerobic organisms, use oxygen from the air to release energy from the proteins, fats, and carbohydrates in your food. Oxidation of food to make energy—metabolism—takes place in your body's cells and also creates the byproducts water and carbon dioxide, which your body excretes. The presence of free, molecular Oxygen in our atmosphere makes Earth unique in the Galaxy. Oxygen comprises 21% of Earth's atmosphere and is critical to most life forms on the planet. Learn more about Oxygen in this retro-styled cartoon animation. Learn more about our atmosphere by visiting the online exhibition, Change is in the Air at: http://forces.si.edu/

Inside the Smithsonian's Fossil Prep Lab with Michelle Pinsdorf

National Museum of Natural History
Meet Michelle Pinsdorf, fossil preparator at the National Museum of Natural History. Have you ever wondered how scientists decipher the information encrypted in fossils? Every fossil is a time capsule containing a record of events that happened on Earth thousands or millions of years ago. Michelle cleans and prepares fossils to better expose them for study and display. See how she carefully preserves fossils to maintain their value far into the future. This program originally aired on March 9, 2017, as part of the Smithsonian Science How webcast series. Smithsonian Science How brings natural history science and research to middle-school students nationwide. For standards alignment and free teaching resources, visit: https://qrius.si.edu/teachers/online/science-teaching-resources/fossils-preparation-field-museum

Les Maçons de Djenné /The Masons of Djenné

National Museum of Natural History
Le film "Les Maçons de Djenné" a été créé pour l'exposition « Mud Masons of Mali » au Musée National d'Histoire Naturelle de l'Institution Smithsonian. Les maçons parlent de l'histoire de leur ville ; de leur métier, et des défis et des transformations culturelles auxquels ils sont confrontés aujourd'hui. Le film est sous-titré en français. The Masons of Djenné is a film created for the exhibition "Mud Masons of Mali" at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. The Djenné masons speak about the history of the city; the building profession, and the challenges and changes they face today. Subtitled in French.

What's Ash Anyway?

National Museum of Natural History
Learn about the ash that comes from volcanoes with Dr. Liz Cottrell, a geologist from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History.

Vision in the Deep Sea, a look at the Diverse Eyes of Hyperiid amphipods

National Museum of Natural History
How do hyperiid amphipods see in the deep blue sea? Jamie Baldwin-Fergus discusses her research on these small to medium crustaceans living deep in the pelagic waters.

Human Origins: Expanding World of Homo Erectus

National Museum of Natural History
For more on this, visit the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History's humanorigins.si.edu!

Discovering Marine Invertebrates with Karen Osborn

National Museum of Natural History
What unknown creatures live in the open ocean? Join zoologist Karen Osborn as she peers into the ocean depths using a remotely operated vehicle to look for organisms. See the life she discovers in the mid-water habitat 200-4,000 meters down. Find out how zoologists give names to the new species they find. Aired March 26, 2015.

Human Origins: New Technology for Old Fossils

National Museum of Natural History
Members of the Human Origins Program team describe how they use cutting-edge technology in their scientific investigations.

Torrey Rick, Archaeologist and Curator (Part 2 of 2)

National Museum of Natural History
Curator Torrey Rick on his archaeological research in the Channel Islands, CA.

Marshallese Weaving Patterns: Encoding Class, Clan, and Change Through Time

National Museum of Natural History
Ingrid Ahlgren discusses her research of the importance of woven mats within the culture of the Marshall Islands in the North Pacific Ocean.

Skin & Bones - Animal Life: Swordfish

National Museum of Natural History
Swordfishes are ocean predators capable of swimming at high speeds; they use their flattened bill to slash and spear their prey. This video is one of a series taken from the mobile app Skin & Bones. The app brings animal skeletons to life through 3D imagery in the Bone Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Download on the App Store and enjoy the videos and 3D experience at the Museum or wherever you are.

Meet Smithsonian Lichenologist Manuela Dal Forno

National Museum of Natural History
Dr. Manuela Dal Forno is a research scientist with the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. Ever since she was a young child, she would investigate the stuff growing on trees in her native Brazil. She now has dedicated her career to studying this "stuff": lichens. As a lichenologist, a scientist who studies lichens, Manuela’s research is focused on understanding the diversity of lichens. By examining lichens that she discovers in the field and ones housed in the U.S. National Herbarium, Manuela is discovering new species and unraveling the complex relationships among lichens' symbionts: fungus, algae, and other microorganisms. Watch a live webcast, "What's a Lichen?", Nov. 14, 2019, featuring Manuela. She'll discuss her work and answer viewer questions. https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning/what-is-lichen-symbiosis

Mummy Science with David Hunt

National Museum of Natural History
Did you know that mummies are often made accidentally? Find about more at: https://qrius.si.edu/ RECORDED LIVE May 7, 2015 Meet anthropologist David Hunt, who is an expert on mummies and how they are made. Compare human-made mummies to naturally-made mummies as we take a journey into research on people of the past. The Smithsonian Science How webcast features the research and personalities of the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, providing your students with positive STEM role models, information about science careers and pathways, and more! The program delivers real-world science through free, live webcasts and teaching resources. Thanks for making Smithsonian Science How an award-winning program! We were recognized by EdTech Digest as the winner of the 2015 Cool Tool Award in the “E-learning Solution” category and by the American Alliance of Museums with a 2015 MUSE award for Education and Outreach. TEACHING RESOURCES https://qrius.si.edu/webcast-teaching-resources-mummies-and-mummification STEM Subject: Mummies and Mummification National Middle School Science Standards: Life Science, Physical Science National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies Key Terms: physical anthropology, archaeology, skeletal remains, mummification, burial practices, decomposition, culture Key Concepts: ▪ Skeletal analysis for age, sex, health ▪ Cultural burial practices over time ▪ Chemical process of mummification ▪ Scientific benefits of studying mummies ▪ Technology used by physical anthropologists NEXT GENERATION SCIENCE STANDARDS (NGSS) The Mummy Science - Natural and Cultural Preserved Remains Webcast Package supports students in meeting the following middle school NGSS Performance Expectations by offering a set of resources that integrate science concepts with science practice skills. MS-LS1 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes ▪ MS-LS1-1 Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells; either one cell or many different numbers and types of cells. ▪ MS-LS1-5 Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms. MS-PS1 Matter and its Interactions ▪ MS-PS1-2 Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred. NATIONAL CURRICULUM STANDARDS FOR SOCIAL STUDIES (NCSS) The Mummy Science package supports students in meeting the Social Studies listed below by offering a set of resources that integrate anthropology concepts with anthropology skills. Time, Continuity, and Change ▪ Studying the past makes it possible for us to understand the human story across time. ▪ Knowledge and understanding of the past enable us to analyze the causes and consequences of events and developments, and to place these in the context of the institutions, values and beliefs of the periods in which they took place. ▪ Knowing how to read, reconstruct and interpret the past allows us to answer questions such as: How do we learn about the past? How can we evaluate the usefulness and degree of reliability of different historical sources? People, Places, and Environments ▪ The study of people, places, and environments enables us to understand the relationship between human populations and the physical world. During their studies, learners develop an understanding of spatial perspectives, and examine changes in the relationship between peoples, places and environments.

Human Origins: Designing the Exhibition

National Museum of Natural History
This video takes you behind-the-scenes into the process of designing and building the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History's Hall of Human Origins. For more visit humanorigins.si.edu. This video is available with both English and Spanish closed captions.

Three Hundred Years of Linnaean Taxonomy [Part 1 of 5]

National Museum of Natural History
http://www.mnh.si.edu/ In Celebration of the Exhibition of the 1st Edition of Linnaeus' Systema Naturae - Tuesday, November 13, 2007. Scientists around the world are celebrating the 300th anniversary of the birth of Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus. He is best known for instituting a two-name method for identifying plants and animals, called binomial nomenclature. Considered the "father" of modern taxonomy, Linnaeus named approximately 4,400 species of animals and 7,700 species of plants. Today, many museums, including this one, continue to research the relationships between species, and rely on Linnaeus' classic works.

Skin & Bones - Animal Life: Blue Catfish

National Museum of Natural History
Blue Catfish bodies are built for the strong currents of the large rivers where they move up and down stream with the seasons. This video is one of a series taken from the mobile app Skin & Bones. The app brings animal skeletons to life through 3D imagery in the Bone Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Download on the App Store and enjoy the videos and 3D experience at the Museum or wherever you are.

"Living Our Cultures" in Alaska

National Museum of Natural History
In the first arrangement of its kind, the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and National Museum of the American Indian loaned more than 600 Alaska artifacts to their place of origin. These cultural treasures are on display until 2017 in the exhibition "Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska" at the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center located in the Anchorage Museum. Join Arctic Studies Center anthropologist Aron Crowell and Inupiaq educator Paul Ongtooguk for a tour of the exhibition and research facility in Anchorage, Alaska. For more information, go to http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/alaska.htm.

Exploring the Solar System with Antarctic Meteorites featuring Dr. Cari Corrigan

National Museum of Natural History
Meet Dr. Cari Corrigan, geologist at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Have you ever considered what meteorites reveal about our early solar system? A meteorite is a piece of rock that has come from far away in space and time. Cari analyzes meteorites that have landed in Antarctica to find evidence of the history of planets. See how the structure and composition of each meteorite is interpreted using modern laboratory techniques. Take a journey with Cari to Mars and back to get a new perspective on a planet that once had water like Earth. This video is part of the Smithsonian Science How webcast series and aligns with national science standards. Visit http://qrius.si.edu/explore-science/webcast/exploring-solar-system-with-antarctic-meteorites for related teaching materials and more Smithsonian Science How videos.

Evolving into the Night: Visual Adaptations to Nocturnality in Birds

National Museum of Natural History
How do nocturnal birds see at night and what is the evolutionary history of this adaptation in birds? Noor White discusses two potential scenarios for how nightvision evolved within a bird group that includes of hummingbirds and nightjars.
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