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Patterns of Health and Wellbeing 03: Ohero:kon

National Museum of the American Indian
Health issues among American Indians, such as diabetes and substance abuse, are reaching epidemic levels. The majority of governmental and externally driven responses to these health issues have focused on the physical aspects of disease. Much less research has been done on the relationships between culture and health within Native communities. This symposium presents a report on active collaborations between Native community members and researchers that focus on the distinct cultural values about wellbeing held by Native communities in solving serious health issues. Cosponsored by the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. In section 3, Louise McDonald (Haudenosaunee-Mohawk) speaks on Ohero:kon: Orientations in the Values of Traditional Ritual Cycles of Life. In her presentation she speaks of community-based programs to promote wellbeing. Tewakierahkwa (Louise McDonald) is a Bear Clan Mother of the Mohawk Nation from the territory at Akwesasne, condoled in the traditional Chieftainship title of Tehanakarine (Dragging Horns) since 2005. The title has been in her family for almost 100 years. She is also a ceremonialist in moon-based rituals as well as lodger leader/conductor of the Moon Lodge Society. Working with women of all ages and tending to maternal and child wellness in her community, she conducts a coming of age ceremony called Ohero:kon ("Under the Husk") for adolescent youth in her community every spring. As clan mother, she bestows ancestral names upon newborns in her clan and has the vested matrilineal authority to select a man into chieftainship title. She works as a Healing Master for the St Regis Mohawk Tribe in a Remediation Project focused on cultural restoration. Patterns of Health and Wellbeing: An Intercultural Symposium was webcast from the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Rasmuson Theater on April 11, 2014.

Day of the Dead/Día de los Muertos 2016 - Dance of the Jaguar 3

National Museum of the American Indian
As in years past, the Smithsonian Latino Center teamed up with the National Museum of the American Indian to celebrate the rich cultural heritage represented in the celebration of Día de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead. In this segment, the local Mixteca culture organization, Grupo Los Tecuanes, perform the traditional dance, Danza de los Tecuanes - Dance of the Jaguar, for the museum's annual Day of the Dead/Día de los Muertos celebration. This is the first of two performances of the dance performed on the second day of the festival. The program was webcast from the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on October 30, 2016.

The Great Inka Empire: The Meaning of Qorikancha

National Museum of the American Indian
Dr. Jorge Flores Ochoa, Faculty of Anthropology, Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad, Cusco, talks about the meaning of Qoricancha, an open space, or kancha in Quechua, where a garden was created from sculptures made of silver and gold. The Quechua word for gold is qori. Produced for the exhibition "The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire" (http://americanindian.si.edu/inkaroad/), on view at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., through June 1, 2018.

Hawaiian Cultural Festival 2015: Halau Nohona Hawai`i 2

National Museum of the American Indian
This year's theme for our annual Hawaiian Cultural Festival is The Epic Journey of Pele and Hi'iaka. In this segment Halau Nohona Hawai`i treat us to their second performance of Hawaiian music and hula. Halau Nohona Hawai`i is non-profit Hawaiian cultural school located in Silver Spring, MD, dedicated to enriching and making a positive impact on local Hawaiian communities by sharing the spirit of aloha. This performance was webcast and recorded at the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC on May 17, 2015.

Tradiciones Bolivianas - Bolivian Dance

National Museum of the American Indian
Tradiciones Bolivianas, Bolivian Traditions Cultural Society, was formed by artists and tradition bearers from Bolivia, in an effort to preserve and share the culture, music, dance and traditions of the Bolivian people. To maintain these traditions, the performance group was created in 1997. The dances performed by our group are following the traditions of their ancestors in the choreography, regalia, music, and customs. This performance took place on January 18, 2013 as part of the Out of Many multicultural festival of music, dance, and story.

Native/American Fashion 11 | Lynette Nylander

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the third panelist to speak on the topic Problematics of Cultural Appropriation in Contemporary Fashion, writer, editor, and creative consultant Lynette Nylander. Her talk is titled Cultural Appropriation or Appreciation? A Modern-Day Critique. Lynette Nylander is a writer, editor, and creative consultant living in London. Recently named to the Forbes 30 Under 30 Europe list, she previously held the position of deputy editor of prestigious style bible i-D ; she continues to contribute to both i-D and the biannual Industrie magazine. She regularly contributes to Elle UK, The Guardian, and Refinery29, and has spoken at the British Film Institute and the Victoria and Albert Museum on race, gender, and pop culture. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

National Native American Veterans Memorial: Washington, D.C., Consultation

National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian has been authorized by Congress to create a memorial honoring the service of Native Americans in the Armed Forces of the United States. During this consultation, tribal leaders hear from Kevin Gover (Pawnee Tribe of Oklahoma), director of the museum, about plans for the memorial. They ask questions and offer suggestions on several aspects of the plan. This meeting was webcast and recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., on September 28, 2016.

Infinity of Nations, National Museum of the American Indian in New York

National Museum of the American Indian
INFINITY OF NATIONS Art and History in the Collections of the National Museum of the American Indian This ongoing exhibition presents more than 700 works of art from throughout Native North, Central, and South America. This unparalleled assemblage of American Indian cultural material represents the tremendous breadth of the collections and the remarkable richness of Native traditional and contemporary art. It also explores the historic importance of a significant number of these deeply cultural, profoundly social objects. The Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian in New York, the George Gustav Heye Center, features exhibitions, performances, films and symposia that present the diversity of the Native people of the Americas and the strength and continuity of their cultures from the earliest times to the present. The National Museum of the American Indian in New York is located at One Bowling Green, across from Battery Park, in the historic Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House.

Nation to Nation: 04 Robert N. Clinton

National Museum of the American Indian
This special symposium celebrates the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian’s landmark exhibition, Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations, and the notable book of the same title that accompanies the exhibition. In this segment, Robert N. Clinton speaks on "Treaties with Native Nations: Iconic Historical Records or Modern Necessity?" Robert N. Clinton is the Foundation Professor of Law at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University (ASU) and an affiliated faculty member of the ASU American Indian Studies Program. He is also a faculty fellow at the Center for Law, Science and Innovation. He has served on the courts of several tribes in addition to teaching and writing about tribal law, Native American history, federal courts, cyberspace law, copyright, and civil procedure. His publications include numerous articles on federal Indian law and policy, constitutional law, and federal jurisdiction. This symposium was webcast and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on September 18. 2014.

1. Welcome - (Re)Presenting America: The Evolution of Culturally Specific Museums

National Museum of the American Indian
Welcome from Tim Johnson, Associate Director for Museum Programs, and opening remarks by symposium moderator Ray Suarez, Senior Correspondent, PBS NewsHour. The National Museum of the American Latino Commission's report recommending the establishment of a Smithsonian National Museum of the American Latino prompts debate concerning the value of "ethnic" or "culturally specific" museums. Thoughtful people ask whether the proliferation of museums dedicated to particular experiences or cultures contributes to the "balkanization" of the United States. Others observe that traditional museums have not represented our country's people and their achievements as fully as they should be. Ethnic/culturally specific museums, they note, provide different portals into what it means to be an American, and their programs provide depth and fullness of perspective, enriching our national narrative. These are serious questions that the Smithsonian seeks to address in a comprehensive, insightful way. By presenting various facets of the existence and practices of "ethnic/culturally specific" museums at the Smithsonian and elsewhere, this special symposium advances a vital discussion of a challenging subject. It provides an important step toward understanding the history of museums in matters of race, the development of "ethnic/culturally specific" museums, and the development of a cogent philosophy on these museums. #CulturalMuseums

Living Earth Festival: Southern Ute Bear Dancers 2

National Museum of the American Indian
The Southern Ute reservation is in southwestern Colorado. For the Living Earth Festival, the Southern Ute Bear Dancers demonstrate the bear dance, a courtship dance in which the women chose the partner they wish to dance with. This is the second of two demonstrations given by the dancers that were webcast from the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on July 19, 2014.

Cherokee Days 2019 – Traditional Dance 4

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum's sixth annual Cherokee Days Festival brings together members from the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes (Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) to celebrate and share their culture, history, and arts with the public. In this video, the Tsa-La-Gi touring group representing the Oconaluftee Indian Village in Cherokee, North Carolina perform traditional social dances, and welcome audience members to join them in a friendship dance. This performance was webcast and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on April 13, 2019.

The Great Inka Road: Hawkaypata—The Plaza at the Center of Cusco

National Museum of the American Indian
Hawkaypata, the plaza at the heart of Cusco, was the center of Inka ceremonial and political power. The four suyus—or provinces—of the Inka Empire, came together at Cusco, and roads to the four suyus originated at Hawkaypata. The speakers in this video are Donato Amado Gonzales, a doctoral candidate at Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú and a member of Peru's National Academy of History, and Ramiro Matos Mendieta, a leading archaeologist of Andean cultures and co-curator of the exhibition "The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire." Produced for the exhibition "The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire" (http://americanindian.si.edu/inkaroad/), on view at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., through June 1, 2018.

Hawaiian Cultural Festival 2019: Mele and Hula in Honor of Kamehameha 4

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum's annual Hawaiian Cultural festival this year celebrates the life and legacy of King Kamehameha – respected Native Hawaiian warrior, leader, and diplomat – who united the Hawaiian Islands into a royal kingdom in 1810. In this video, local Hawaiian cultural organization, Hā lau Ho‘omau I ka Wai Ola O Hawai‘i, perform mele (chants or songs) and hula (dance) to honor King Kamehameha I. This is the second of two performances by Hā lau Ho‘omau I ka Wai Ola O Hawai‘i recorded during the festival. It was webcast and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on May 19, 2019.

Kay WalkingStick: An American Artist

National Museum of the American Indian
"Kay WalkingStick: An American Artist" opens November 7, 2015, at the National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, DC. http://nmai.si.edu/explore/exhibitions/item/?id=949 "Kay WalkingStick: An American Artist" is the first major retrospective of the artistic career of Kay WalkingStick (b. 1935), an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation and one of the world’s most celebrated artists of Native American ancestry. Featuring more than 75 of her most notable paintings, drawings, small sculptures, notebooks, and the diptychs for which she is best known, the exhibition traces her career over more than four decades and culminates with her recent paintings of monumental landscapes and Native places. The symposium Seizing the Sky: Redefining American Art, Nov. 5 from 1 to 5:30 pm at the museum, celebrates Kay WalkingStick and considers her renowned work as a launching point for a fresh perspective and dialogue about contemporary American art. Symposium flyer: http://nmai.si.edu/sites/1/files/pdf/seminars-symposia/Kay-WalkingStick-flyer.pdf ‪#‎KayWalkingStick‬ #KWSAmericanArtist

Racist Stereotypes and Cultural Appropriation in American Sports 2

National Museum of the American Indian
Case Studies In this day-long symposium sports writers, scholars, authors, and representatives from sports organizations engaged in lively panel discussions on racist stereotypes and cultural appropriation in American sports. The symposium explores the mythology and psychology of sports stereotypes and mascots, and examines the retirement of "Native American" sports references and collegiate efforts to revive them despite the NCAA's policy against "hostile and abusive" nicknames and symbols. In this second session of the symposium, panelist talk about specific American Indian mascots and the efforts to get sports teams to change them. The panelists for this session are: Dr. Suzan Shown Harjo, Moderator. President, The Morning Star Institute; Past Executive Director, National Congress of American Indians; and a Founding Trustee, National Museum of the American Indian Dr. Lee Hester, Associate Professor and Director of American Indian Studies and Director of the Meredith Indigenous Humanities Center, The University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma Ms. Lois J. Risling, Educator and Land Specialist for the Hoopa Valley Tribes; and Retired Director, Center for Indian Community Development, Humboldt State University N. Bruce Duthu, Esq., Chair and Professor, Native American Studies, Dartmouth College Delise O'Meally, Esq., Director of Governance and International Affairs, National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Hon. Ben Nighthorse Campbell, Council of Chiefs, Northern Cheyenne Tribe; President, Nighthorse Consultants; Trustee, National Museum of the American Indian; Award-winning Artist/Jeweler; U.S. Representative of Colorado (1987-1993); and U.S. Senator of Colorado (1992-2005) The symposium was webcast on February 7, 2013 from the Rasmuson Theater.

How Carbon Affects Nearly Everything on Earth – Including Our Future

National Museum of Natural History
This video uses an animated machine to show how carbon moves around the Earth’s surface – from the atmosphere to plants to animals to soils to oceans to rocks. Carbon moves quickly between the atmosphere, plants, animals and the ocean. Carbon ordinarily moves VERY slowly between rocks and the atmosphere. Over the last few centuries, though, we humans have increased that slow rate more than a 100-fold by mining and burning fossil fuels. Humans have thrown the carbon cycle out of adjustment, with increasingly severe consequences for climate, oceans, and ecosystems. We have to bring the cycle back into balance to reduce unwanted changes.

Masons of Djenné - City of Mud

National Museum of Natural History
Part one of a four part film series created for the exhibition, Mud Masons of Mali. Djenné masons speak of the history of city, its founding myth, its architecture and the role of the masons in maintaining this architectural legacy. The masons also speak about the importance for the community of the annual ceremony of re-plastering the Great Mosque. Djenné Masons Konbaba Tennepo Boubacar (Bayeré) Kouroumansé Lassina (Al-Haji) Kouroumansé Salif Droufo Almamy (Fa) Kouroumansé Executive Producer Mary Jo Arnoldi Producer/Director Trevor Marchand Videographer Pete Durgerian Production Assistant John Heywood Interviewer Bilagalama Sissoko Additional Camerawork Salahina (Mody) Sounfountera (Djenné) Trevor Marchand (Leiden) Translation Wilfred Willey Photography Tevor Marchand Additional Photography Barbara Frank Joseph Brunet-Jailly Bilagalama Sissoko Donald Hurlbert, NMNH, Smithsonian Institution Dan Cole, NMNH, Smithsonian Institution Narrator Rae Durgerian Music Lassana Diabaté Toumani Kouyaté Music Production, Bamako Paul Chandler Audio Post-Production Al Green Special Thanks to Annette Schmidt, Rijksmuseum voor Volkenkunde, Leiden Michael Spierenburg Samuel Sidibé, Musée National du Mali British Academy for the Humanities and Social Sciences The Netherlands Embassy in Bamako, Mali Salahina Sounfountera, Mali Tours, Bamako Indiana University Press Lucy Durán, School of Oriental and African Studies, London Violet Diallo Geert Mommersteeg Pierre Maas Charlotte Joy The Atlantic Fish Shop, Leiden Al-Hijrah Mosque in Leiden The Dutch masons of Koninklijke Woudenberg B.V. Anna Portisch

Skin & Bones - Animal Life: Steller's Sea Cow

National Museum of Natural History
The Steller's Sea Cow is a large extinct marine mammal that inhabited the cold waters surrounding an island on the Bering Sea. This video is one of a series taken from the mobile app Skin & Bones. The app brings animal skeletons to life through 3D imagery in the Bone Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Download on the App Store and enjoy the videos and 3D experience at the Museum or wherever you are.

How do paleontologists identify dinosaur teeth?

National Museum of Natural History
Smithsonian Curator Matthew Carrano identifies Cretaceous dinosaur teeth from the Washington DC area.

Finding Remains- Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.

National Museum of Natural History
http://www.mnh.si.edu/ Go along as Smithsonian forensic anthropologists unearth an unusual discovery from colonial Maryland.

The Artistry and History of Aleutian Islands Bentwood Hats

National Museum of Natural History
Alaska Native artist Patty Lekanoff-Gregory explains the technique and artistry of making Unangax (Aleut) bentwood hats and visors. She also shares the importance of these hats in traditional Aleutian Islands culture. Patty was born and raised in Unalaska, on Unalaska Island in the Aleutian Islands chain of Alaska, which is the westernmost part of the United States. She is the daughter of Nicholai S. Lekanoff, originally from the now abandoned village of Makushin (Unalaska Island), and Polly Kudrin Lekanoff, originally from the now abandoned village of Kashega (Unalaska Island). To see a set of how-to videos and classroom lessons, please go to the "Making Bentwood Hats" section of microsite Sharing Knowledge Alaska: http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/sharing-knowledge-alaska/SharingknowledgeAK_Index.html

Material Traditions: Dene Quill Art

National Museum of Natural History
For a week in October 2013, the Smithsonian Institution's Arctic Studies Center in Alaska brought together three artists who work with porcupine quills, which were stitched, wrapped, and woven onto Athabascan skin clothing, moccasins and bags. The artists exchanged ideas and techniques and studied museum collections, working together to re-discover historical techniques nearly lost. They also shared their knowledge with museum visitors and staff. To see how-to and interview videos, please visit the project microsite at Sharing Knowledge Alaska: http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/sharing-knowledge-alaska/SharingknowledgeAK_Index.html

The Artistry of Tlingit Weaving

National Museum of Natural History
It takes an artist up to 2,000 hours, or 83 days, to weave just one ceremonial robe. Not surprisingly, this art form is practiced by a dedicated few including Tlingit artists Teri Rofkar and Shelly Laws of Alaska. In their presentation for the Smithsonian Spotlight series hosted by the Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum, Rofkar and Laws discuss the methods and cultural significance of robes, spruce root baskets and more. For more information, go to http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/alaska.htm
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