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Michael Holman Family Home Movie #15

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This film is from a collection of home movies filmed by the family of Michael Holman, an important figure in the history of hip hop.

Consists of: 8mm Film (a), Original Film Reel (b), and Original Film Box (c).

2016.31.3.15.1a: 8mm film. The film begins with a series of shots depicting tourist sites around Barcelona, Spain. Included are many shots of the Sagrada Familia. Next is a series of shots taken on an unidentified beach, though several signs are in French. Many of the shots contain a young girl in a bathing suit and conical sun hat. This is followed by shots of the United Nations Office in Geneva, Switzerland and shots of Lake Geneva and its famous Jet d'Eau. The film ends with multiple shots depicting street life from a balcony in an unidentified location.

2016.31.3.15.1b: Original film reel.

2016.31.3.15.1c: Original film box. Standard yellow Kodachrome 8mm film box with handwritten mailing addresses for processing film. Includes a brief handwritten content note.

Michael Holman Family Home Movie #14

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This film is from a collection of home movies filmed by the family of Michael Holman, an important figure in the history of hip hop.

Consists of: 8mm Film (a), Original Film Reel (b), and Original Film Box (c).

2016.31.3.14.1a: 8mm film. The film begins with a series of wide shots taken during the 1963 Baha'i World Congress in London. Next, a group of people pose at the entrance of an unidentified building. Linda Holman stands on the far left, wearing a beige coat with a red sweater underneath. This is followed by a shot of people entering a car parked in a spot marked, "Calais." A series of shots depicting various monuments around Paris, France follows. A middle aged man and a young girl, Linda Holman, pose in many of the shots. Linda wears a navy skirt and jacket. There are two brief shots that appear to have been taken in Nice, France and Monaco. A single shot depicts two young girls on the street of an unidentified city dressed in elaborate white gowns. This is followed by several shots of St. Peter's Square in the Vatican where Linda Holman wears a white sweater, blue skirt, and pink headband, and several shots taken most likely in Nice. A series of shots taken from a moving vehicle depict small villages surrounded by large mountains in an unidentified location. Next, there are multiple shots from a moving vehicle of a large group of West German soldiers and their armored vehicles in an unidentified location. Alice Holman waves at the camera wearing a pink hat and jacket, as she is boarding a ship. The final shot of the film is taken from the deck of ship flying a Hungarian flag.

2016.31.3.14.1b: Original film reel.

2016.31.3.14.1c: Original film box. Standard yellow Kodachrome 8mm film box with a brief handwritten content note.

Michael Holman Family Home Movie #13

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This film is from a collection of home movies filmed by the family of Michael Holman, an important figure in the history of hip hop.

Consists of: 8mm Film (a), Original Film Reel (b), and Original Film Box (c).

2016.31.3.13.1a: 8mm film. The film begins with wide shots of a group of people gathered outdoors in an unidentified location in Arizona. Several people are dressed in the traditionalthe traditional clothing of an unidentified Native American tribe. In one shot, two men hug and greet one another and in others various groups of people pose together for the camera. Alice Holman appears in a group of four people on the far right. She is holding a large purse and wearing plaid pants, a white shirt, a blue hairband, and sunglasses. In a later shot, all of the people present assemble for a group photo with a Baha'i Faith banner. Several people then speak at a microphone to the gathering of people. The film then changes to a series of shots taken on a cruise ship, the S.S. Rotterdam. Included are images of people relaxing on deck and posing for the camera. Linda Holman reclines on a deck chair and waves, while wearing a red and white checked sweater and gray skirt. She then talks to another child in front of the camera.

2016.31.3.13.1b: Original film reel.

2016.31.3.13.1c: Original film box. Standard yellow Kodachrome 8mm film box with brief handwritten content notes.

Michael Holman Family Home Movie #12

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This film is from a collection of home movies filmed by the family of Michael Holman, an important figure in the history of hip hop.

Consists of: 8mm Film (a), Original Film Reel (b), and Original Film Box (c).

2016.31.3.12.1a: 8mm film. The film begins with images of the Baha'i House of Worship in Wilmette, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. The various shots capture the main structure itself, as well as the surrounding grounds. In one shot, a group of people descend a set of stairs in front of the temple. Next, an older woman, possibly Pauline Woods, stares into the lens not realizing that the camera is recording. This is followed by a series of shots depicting a teenage boy, David Gaylord Montgomery, wearing a navy suit and white shirt and interacting with and posing for the camera. He emerges from the front door of a home, poses in front of the home, and then poses in front of a car. The final series of shots show an older woman posing in the yard of a home in an unidentified location. The series also includes images of plants in the home's garden.

2016.31.3.12.1b: Original film reel.

2016.31.3.12.1c: Original film box. Standard yellow Kodachrome 8mm film box with a brief handwritten content note.

Michael Holman Family Home Movie #11

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This film is from a collection of home movies filmed by the family of Michael Holman, an important figure in the history of hip hop.

Consists of: 8mm Film (a), Original Film Reel (c), and Original Film Box (c).

2016.31.3.11.1a: 8mm film. The film begins with a series of shots of a group of people in Paris filling a car to capacity with luggage. This is followed by a shot of a group of people posed in front of the Eiffel Tower. Next, the film depicts people gathering and greeting one another outside Royal Albert Hall in London for the Baha'i World Faith Congress. Linda Holman stands in the center of a group of people wearing a headscarf tied around her chin and a jacket with a fur collar. Linda Holman then appears in another shot wearing a white jacket and a light colored headband. Among those in the crowd are people clothed in Mexican charro suits and South Asian saris. The film concludes with a wide shot of the proceedings of the congress within the concert hall.

2016.31.3.11.1b: Original film reel.

2016.31.3.11.1c: Original film box. Standard yellow Kodachrome 8mm film box with handwritten mailing addresses for processing film. Includes a brief handwritten content note.

Michael Holman Family Home Movie #10

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This film is from a collection of home movies filmed by the family of Michael Holman, an important figure in the history of hip hop.

Consists of: 8mm Film (a), Original Film Reel (c), and Original Film Box (c).

2016.31.3.10.1a: 8mm film. The film begins with a series of shots of street scenes and landmarks around Madrid, Spain. Included are the Arco de la Victoria and the Spanish Air Force Headquarters. Next is a series of shots taken from a moving vehicle and include images of people along the side of the road, as well as a Spanish soldier. This is followed by a wide shot overlooking Avila, Spain. This is followed by more shots of street scenes, many of which focus on local children in an unidentified city interacting with the camera operator. Another series of street scenes and shots of landmarks follows, possibly in and around Plaza Mayor in Madrid. Further shots from a moving vehicle follow this series and includes an extended shot of women performing road construction. Next, there is a brief series of shots of an unidentified church and surrounding plaza followed by a wide shot of windmills spinning in the distance. This is followed by a series of shots taken in and around the Praça do Comércio in Lisbon, Portugal. The film ends with a series of shots from a moving vehicle that depict unidentified locations.

2016.31.3.10.1b: Original film reel. Standard yellow Kodak 8mm film box with handwritten mailing addresses for processing film. Includes a brief handwritten content note.

2016.31.3.10.1c: Original film box.

Malcolm X Liberation University [Black Journal segment]

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This 16mm color film is a short documentary subject made for National Educational Television's Black Journal television program. Producer St. Clair Bourne chronicles the opening of Malcolm X Liberation University in North Carolina.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a), Original 400 foot Film Reel (b), and Original 400 foot Film Canister (c).

2012.79.1.68.1a: The film opens with a student meeting/rally at Duke University, in which one unidentified student speaker (male) states why they longer wish to participate in a system they don't believe speaks to the needs of African American college students. A male narrator begins to speak, explaining what the Black Student Movement at Duke University was and how it originated and morphed into a separate institution. An interview with Howard Fuller begins to play, and he expresses why he doesn't believe in institutionalized black studies programs. Footage of him announcing the opening of Malcolm X Liberation University begins to play, and is followed by clips of the opening celebratory parade and rally. The narrator describes the new university's proposed curriculum and study abroad program in Africa. Howard Fuller addressed the crowd by reading a statement from Stokely Carmichael, and introduced guest speaker Betty Shabazz. During her speech, white train workers in a nearby train yard rang a train car bell to interrupt her speech. A visiting professor who was in attendance climbed on top of the train car and silenced the bell so Betty Shabazz could finish her speech. A small group of women sing "The Black Magician" onstage. Courtland Cox, a representative from Malcolm X Liberation University's sister school in Washington, DC, closed the ceremony. The film ends with an interview with Howard Fuller speaking on the role of Malcolm X Liberation University can and hopes to play in the black liberation struggle.

2012.79.1.68.1b: Original 400 foot film reel.

2012.79.1.68.1c: Original 400 foot film canister. The metal can has a sticker label from a film distribution company with the name of film.

J. Max Bond, Sr. Home Movie #5

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This 16mm color film is one of ten home movies shot by J. Max Bond Sr. from 1930 to 1960. The footage mainly focuses on family, travel, and educational institutions with which J. Max Bond, Sr. was associated.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a) and Original 400 foot Film Reel (b).

2016.16.5.1a: 16mm film. The film opens with various exterior shots of a church. This is followed by a long shot of buildings through a wooded area. Brief interior shots of a home show a kitchen and living room area with a silhouetted woman sitting off to the side. More exterior long shots of the church follow. The films ends with footage of homes and a town shot from inside of a moving car.

2016.16.5.1b: Original 400 foot film reel.

J. Max Bond, Sr. Home Movie #4

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This 16mm color film is one of ten home movies shot by J. Max Bond Sr. from 1930 to 1960. The footage mainly focuses on family, travel, and educational institutions with which J. Max Bond, Sr. was associated.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a) and Original 400 foot Film Reel (b).

2016.16.4.1a: 16mm film. The film opens with men casually talking outside of a building. This is followed by a demonstration inside the building of two local men demonstrating, for the visitors, how they weave textiles. Next, the visitors are shown outside looking at an outdoor pottery kiln. This is followed by brief shots of the visitors casually meeting indoors. An exterior shot of "Laboratoire O.J. Brandt" is captured before the camera tilts down revealing a group of men standing in front and shaking hands with a woman. An indoor shot of a table covered in miscellaneous pottery items follows, and the outdoor pottery kiln is shown again; fired up. A group of men stand around inspecting various pottery items, a man pokes a stick inside the kiln, and a car trunk full of clayworks tools and a portable kiln is shown. A boy holds up a clay figurine for the camera, and various shots of blossomed trees follow. A wide shot of a group of women standing and talking is followed by a series of low-angle, portrait style shots and another group shot. Next, there is travel footage of an unknown town in Tunisia. Locals walk around the city, and there is wide shot of the Beit El synagogue in Sfax, Tunisia. Next, a long shot reveals the ancient Roman amphitheater in El-Djem, Tunisia and is followed by various shots walking around inside of the ancient ruins. The film ends with a very brief shot of boats docked on a bay.

2016.16.4.1b: Original 400 foot film reel.

J. Max Bond, Sr. Home Movie #3

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This 16mm color film is one of ten home movies shot by J. Max Bond, Sr. from 1930 to 1960. The footage mainly focuses on family, travel, and educational institutions with which J. Max Bond Sr. was associated.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a) and Original 400 foot Film Reel (b).

2016.16.3.1a: 16mm film. The film opens with a wide shot of men cheering from a covered grandstand at a homecoming football game. This is followed by pan shots of finely dressed women standing in a line and seated men cheering for the camera. Subsequently, there are wide shots of the football team warming up and of the game itself. Next, there are multiple shots of the Tuskegee marching band performing on the football field. The camera then shoots a man speaking to the crowd. This is followed by more shots of the marching band and the football game. The film then cuts to scenes from a ceramics class. There are multiple shots of ceramic objects and a close up of a bust of Booker T. Washington being sculpted. The following scene depicts children in a classroom with wide shots of the children and a teacher seated in a circle and multiple portrait-style shots of the children and teachers. Next, a weaving class is shown with wide shots of a loom in operation and students showing off objects they've made in the class. This is followed by multiple shots of a cooking class where a teacher is training students in various techniques. The next several shots are out of focus, but appear to depict people formally entering a room. The film ends with multiple shots from a funeral with both wide and portrait-style shots of the mourners.

2016.16.3.1b: Original 400 foot film reel.

J. Max Bond, Sr. Home Movie #2

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This 16mm color film is one of ten home movies shot by J. Max Bond Sr. from 1930 to 1960. The footage mainly focuses on family, travel, and educational institutions with which J. Max Bond, Sr. was associated.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a) and Original 400 foot Film Reel (b).

2016.16.2.1a: 16mm film. The film opens with color footage of a group men, women, and children sitting on a porch and smiling at the camera. This is followed by scenes of various people working on farms. Next, there is an out of focus wide shot of a family standing on a porch. There are multiple portrait-style shots of children. Followed by multiple shots of cattle. This is followed by black and white footage of school children and three female school teachers entering a rural school house. There are some interior and exterior portrait-style shots of children smiling at the camera. The same portrait-style shots are then used to capture adults standing in a field on a farm.

2016.16.2.1b: Original 400 foot film reel.

J. Max Bond, Sr. Home Movie #1: Afghanistan

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This 16mm color film is one of ten home movies shot by J. Max Bond, Sr. from 1930 to 1960. The footage mainly focuses on family, travel, and educational institutions with which J. Max Bond Sr. was associated.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a) and Original 400 foot Film Reel (b).

2016.16.1.1ab: 16mm film. The film opens with an interior shot of a little boy smiling at the camera. This is followed by various scenes of buildings, marketplaces, and men working (shoveling snow) around an unknown city in Afghanistan. There is one brief shot of a woman facing the camera and taking a photo. The film ends with a shot of an airfield and more snow covered footage of the city.

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It's The Same Old Game

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm color film that features interviews with children about their neighborhood, interviews with community activists, and planners that advocate for community involvement. Aimed at the local citizen, this film encourages citizen participation in the planning process. Footage shows problematic aspects of poor urban planning, including air pollution caused by trucks, water pollution, and other problems with industrial areas to close to residential areas. Footage also includes a contentious meeting on the construction of a new high school near Carroll Gardens in Brooklyn.

2012.79.1.52.1a: 16mm color film.

The film begins with a voiceover narration and a soft music soundtrack. The narration explains that without citizen involvement in the planning process, then planning will be, as the title suggests, "the same old game." The film then shows three men standing over a table with a model of a city plan on it. The next scene features Leroy Bowser standing with a pole over a large floor model of New York City. As he discusses housing in the city, he moves around the model and points to different neighborhoods. The next scenes show houses and streets in Jamaica, Queens. Children are interviewed, and they discuss problems with crime and sanitation. The next interview is with Dan De Vore, and he talk about problems with housing that shares neighborhood space with industrial businesses. The footage then shows more street scenes and interviews with the same group of children from earlier in the film. The next scene features a group of planners looking at plans on a table. The next interview is with Max Bond, and he discusses the importance of community power. An unidentified woman joins in and remarks about the "game," and the struggle to figure out how to leverage it to the community's advantage. Max Bond agrees and suggests one way to change the "game" is to that elect people from the neighborhood onto planning commissions and into other offices. The next person to speak is Art Symes, and he remarks that even with getting community people involved in planning commissions, the old methods require change as well. The next scene shows street scenes in Harlem, and then an aerial view of the streets from the top of a building. The next interview is with Paul Davidoff, and he discusses the problems with white professional planners making decisions on planning without working with people on the street and understanding what they need and the problems to fix. The next scenes show various problems with housing near industrial districts. In particular, the film shows the problems in Red Hook, Brooklyn, such as the air pollution close to recreation areas for children. The film continues to show a variety of industrial blight mixed in with housing in south Brooklyn. The next interview is with José Flores, and he discusses how to improve neighborhood aesthetics and the problems with heavy trucks traveling through the neighborhood. The next scenes show the problem with a highway cutting through a neighborhood. The next scene shows a community meeting about a planned high school for Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn. About a half dozen residents speak out about the planning process and how decisions are made. The main issue appears to be black and white children attending the high school together. There are also many shots of the audience at the meeting. The next interview is with Francisco A. Román as he is in the process of moving his mother out of her apartment because of his concerns about rising crime in the Red Hook neighborhood. The next interview is with Dr. J.D. Carroll, and he talks about the planning in a broader sense of how all of the smaller parts fit together across the entire region and the problems with competing interests. The next scene features Greenburg, New York, where low density, low income housing exists away from industrial areas. There are several shots of children walking around and playing basketball. The final scenes area a montage of clips from the film. The film ends with a shot of traffic coming towards the camera as the film credits are displayed.

2012.79.1.52.1b: Original metal film reel.

2012.79.1.52.1c: Original metal film can. On the film can, there is a label with information that reads [Sterling/ Educational Films/ 241 East 34th Street New York 16, N.Y./ Title: Same Old Game/ Print No. I].

Hunts Point home movie

National Museum of African American History and Culture
16mm black and white film of the Hunts Point neighborhood in the Bronx, New York. The footage includes storefronts, street scenes, and cars.

Consists Of: 16mm Film (a).

2012.79.1.15.1a: 16mm film. The film begins with a street scene. A police car is driving towards the camera, and the camera follows the car as it passes by. The next scene shows two street signs at an intersection. One of the street signs reads Washington St. The next scene shows a storefront window advertising the Beaird Produce Co. and Beaird Seafoods, Ltd. The next scene shows cars driving down the street away from the camera. Also in the footage is an elevated segment of the New York Central Railroad, and several restaurant and bar signs on the side of the buildings. The next scene includes a close-up of the elevated railroad with the New York Central name painted on the side. The camera pans the side of a building that the railroad passes through. The next scene shows another advertisement on a window, and this one reads Boneless Meat. The remaining scenes appear to be filmed from a moving fishing boat. The footage shows other fishing boats in the water and a brief shot of the boat captain.

Hands of Inge

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The 16mm black and white film serves as a short introduction to the work and methodology of acclaimed African American sculptor Inge Hardison. The film, made relatively early in her career, details her working processes with clay, bronze, and wire. The camera largely focuses on her hands, although there are also some shots that include her full body and the model, a young girl, Hardison's daughter, Yolande. The jazz music soundtrack features Mal Waldron, Eric Dolphy, Ron Carter, and Toni Ross. Hortense Beveridge edited the film. There is some voiceover narration by Ossie Davis.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a), Original 400 foot Film Reel (b), and Original 400 foot Can (c).

2012.79.1.9.1a: 16mm film. The film opens with close-ups of Hardison's hands as she displays some tools, cuts a piece of metal, and begins the process of making clay for sculpture. The next scene shows her hands working with metal wire and wood and using wire cutters as she twists the metal around another object. At this point in the film, the narration by Ossie Davis begins. He introduces Hardison and then the camera shot pulls back to show her working on a sculpture on a waist-high table. All of the materials from the previous scene appear to have been used in the sculpture she is working on. The camera shot returns to a close-up of her hands as she molds the clay around the wire. As she continues to work, the clay is molded into the shape of a human head, and Davis reveals that she is creating a bust of Martin Luther King, Jr. The next scenes show some of her other sculpture, including one of Father John Coleman of Brooklyn, Nellie Carrington from the book Smokey Town Road written by Hardison, Elaine Atwell, and her niece Minnie Hardison. The montage of her works ends with a small full nude sculpture. The next scene shows a close-up of hands working on a sculpture of her daughter. Then the footage shows her daughter and compares her to the sculpture with sporadic narration by Davis. He then explains how she is preparing the sculpture to be made into bronze. The next scene shows her hands using pliers to work with wire. The final design shown is a man made of wire in a running position. The film ends with a montage of her hands with and without tools.

2012.79.1.9.1b: Original 400 foot film reel.

2012.79.1.9.1c: Original 400 foot film can. The metal can has a sticker label from a film company on one side and a hand written note taped on to the other side.

Ethiopia [Black Journal segment]

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This 16mm film was a special half-hour-long documentary produced by Kent Garrett for the National Educational Television program Black Journal. This documentary examines the cultural and historical life of Ethiopia.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a).

2012.79.1.49.1a: This 16mm film was a special half-hour-long documentary produced for the National Educational Television program Black Journal. This documentary examines the cultural and historical life of Ethiopia. The entire documentary is voiced-over by a male narrator who describes Ethiopia's intersecting political, religious, and social history. The first half of the documentary is spent telling the history of Christianity in Ethiopia, and its ties to and influence on ancient Ethiopia. There are shots of the Obelisk of Aksum in Ethiopia's Tirgay; a 1,700-year-old granite stele that stands 24 meters tall and weighs 160 metric tons. The narrator then describes the historical architecture and founding of the Church of St. George in the city of Lalibela, located in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia. One of eleven monolithic churches in the city of Lalibela, the narrator explains the importance of this group of rock-hewn churches that were built in the late 12th to early 13th century and serves as a pilgrimage for some. Next, there are scenes of the festival of Timket Holiday in Adis Abeba and footage of various Ethiopian tribes singing and dancing. Ethiopians are described as an African people, diverse in tribal association while sharing common African ancestry. The narrator states that it is a common mistake to racially identify Ethiopians as Middle Eastern.

Drug Employees Union Local 1199 Documentary

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm silent, black and white film that shows members of the Drug Employees Union Local 1199 engaged in various activities. Members are shown attending meetings, working, walking a picket line, signing a petition, attending an art gallery exhibition, and hosting a Christmas party for children.

Consists Of: 16mm Film (a).

2012.79.1.14.1a: 16mm film. Film begins with the 1199 logo that reads "We the Members of Local 1199", and shows drug store workers engaged in a variety of work-related activities. The first scene shows pharmacists at work mixing drugs and assisting customers. The next two scenes show members lining up at a meeting to pay dues at a window. The members shown are both black and white men and women. The next scene shows what appears to be a different meeting with a greater number of people in attendance. The meeting ends, and the members get up to leave. The next scene shows a group of around a dozen people, mostly men, seated around a table. The next scene shows a different meeting. There is a large banner above the stage that has a circle, half of it black, and the numbers 40 and 5 are on either side of the line. There is a table on the stage, where people are seated. They appear to be voting on something because many of those in the crowd raise their hand. The footage shows a second banner that reads Defend & Protect Our Gains...Organize the Unorganized Stores. The next scene shows people exiting, perhaps after the meeting is over. A picket line is seen in the next footage and the striking workers wear signs that read This Drug Store is on Strike Please Do Not Patronize. The 1199 union name is listed below. There is also footage of the picket line that shows the front of the drug store, Freistadt's. The next scene shows men looking at a jobs board and then men lining up at a window to talk to a man behind the counter. The next scene shows an office with mostly women seated at desks using typewriters. In a different office, a man talks to one man, while another man is examined by a doctor with a stethoscope. There is some footage of what appears to be the Local 1199 newsletter Drug News. The next scene shows a room with a lot of beds and men lying on them probably for a blood drive. Nurses attend to the men on the beds, while some of the men drink out of cups (they appear to have donated blood). The next scene shows men with thermometers in their mouths. Following that scene, there is footage of people dancing at a square dance. The footage also shows the band providing the music for the dancers. The next scene appears to show two black women and one white woman acting on stage during a play. The next scene shows a man speaking to a large group of people in a room. A different meeting is shown after that, and a man is handed a trophy. The next scene shows the entrance to a Wolf Ubogy art exhibit, and there is footage of the art on the walls and people talking. The next scene shows a large group of children, and many of them are eating ice cream. Some of them are performing on stage. A clown is also shown performing for the children. He balances a small dog in his hand, and there are other dogs on stage. Another clown performs juggling. A man dressed as Santa Claus appears and waves to the children. The scene ends with two children, one black and one white, sitting on the lap of Santa Claus and waving to the camera. The next scene shows a group of men and women signing an oversize telegram to Governor Dewey in Albany, New York. The telegram subject reads Local 1199 demands No Fare or Rent Increase. The footage also shows a close-up of people signing the telegram. The next scene appears to be a montage of the entire film with brief clips from many of the different scenes. There is footage of a banner that reads 21 Years of Local 1199 in the middle of the banner. On the left hand side is 1932 next to a circle with 66 and 6 inside of the circle. On the right hand side is the same design, except the date is 1953 and inside of the circle is 40 and 5. The next scene is another montage, this time with footage of various meetings and people speaking at microphones. A small banner reads Ligget Division Retail Drug Employees Union Local 1199 - DPOWA. The final scene shows a seated audience clapping and the camera pans the crowd. The same logo from the beginning of the film appears again.

Dark Manhattan

National Museum of African American History and Culture
2015.167.5.1ab: 16mm black and white film.

2015.167.5.1c: Original cardboard film shipping box. No legible inscriptions.

In "Dark Manhattan", a lad who takes control of the policy racket in Harlem, meets a sweet and clean nightclub singer and falls in love with her. Before they can get married, a rival gang tries to muscle into the numbers racket and, at the end, the lad gets shot-gunned and dies in the arms of his girl.

When Larry B. "L. B." Lee, the top numbers banker in Harlem, visits the poolroom of one of his accounts, Jack Jackson, he witnesses James A. "Curly" Thorpe break up a knife fight and, impressed with his performance, asks Curly to join his organization, which he emphasizes does not use underhanded methods. Curly quickly distinguishes himself as tough on district operators, whose business is declining, and grows ambitious in his desire to be the most talked about man in Harlem. He also wants to steal the affections of L. B.'s girl friend, Flo Gray, a radio singer who appears at the Club Congo. After L. B., who has been warned by his doctor to take a rest, has a heart attack while dining with Flo, Curly runs the operation while L. B. recuperates. Curly institutes gangster methods to force smaller operations to pay for protection, and doubles the bank's income, which causes ten days of gang warfare and police raids, culminating in a district attorney's effort to smash the numbers racket. Although Curly and Flo keep newspaper reports away from L. B., the heads of the other numbers banks reveal the situation to him, after which he promises to redistribute the money his bank made. Curly, however, refuses to part with the money made since he took over and prevails upon L. B. to take a trip for his health. After Curly tells the bankers' association that he wants twenty percent from every banker for protection, Butch Williams, a rival who operates at the Club Congo, offers protection for five percent. During a shoot out at the club, Curly is mortally wounded, and he dies in the arms of Flo, who has grown to love him.

Sources:

AFI Catalog of Feature Films. Accessed August 12, 2016 (http://www.afi.com/members/catalog/DetailView.aspx?s=&Movie=2228)

WorldCat. Accessed August 12, 2016 (http://www.worldcat.org/title/dark-manhattan/oclc/57689321&referer=brief_results)

Consists of: 16mm Flim (a), 16mm Flim (b), and Original Film Shipping Box (c).

Count Us In

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Youth-oriented documentary short film about the 1948 Progressive Party convention in Philadelphia. Produced by Union Films. This 16mm black and white presidential campaign film (a) with original film reel (b), and original film can (c) for 1948 Progressive Party candidate Henry Wallace features Paul Robeson and Pete Seeger. The soundtrack is by Bob Claiborne (a Seeger-associated folk musician), who narrates, plays guitar, and sings over footage. The footage includes both outdoor and indoor activities during the July 1948 Progressive Party convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and many scenes of young people speaking, playing music, singing, and dancing. Henry Wallace appears onstage at the convention towards the end of the film. Other delegates and party officals identified in the film are George Jackson from Seton Hall, Alvin Jones from Louisiana, Seymour Linfield, Louis Burnham from Alabama, and Walter Wallace.

2012.79.1.7.1a: Original 16mm acetate film.

2012.79.1.7.1b: Original 400 foot metal reel.

2012.79.1.7.1c: Original 400 foot metal can.

Bedford-Stuyvesant Youth In Action (black and white)

National Museum of African American History and Culture
16mm silent black and white footage of an event held by the community outreach organization Bedford Stuyvesant Youth In Action, Inc. (YIA). The film largely features multiple performances conducted by members of YIA in front of an audience on a residential street in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn in New York City. The performances consist of fashion, dance, and music. The film also features shots of the crowd and artwork on display.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a) and Original Film Can (b).

2012.79.1.12.1a: 16mm film. The film opens with a group of about half dozen youth standing on an elevated stage with a standing crowd in front of them. A band is seated to the lefthand side of the stage facing the audience. A large sign hangs on the building behind the stage with the name of YIA. The young people on stage are all dressed in formal clothes, and put on a fashion show shortly thereafter. They use the stage as a fashion show runway to model the fashions they're wearing. Seven young women in black leotards are the next group to appear on stage, and they perform several different dance routines. As the women exit the stage, three men in black shirts and black leggings walk onto the stage and perform a routine. The film abruptly cuts to a different fashion show. Shortly after, the film abruptly cuts again to scenes of the crowd and some artwork on display. The artwork consists of multimedia and paintings on easels. The film then cuts to several different scenes: a man speaking on stage (he was also seen in an earlier crowd shot), three young women singing, and saxophone players in a jazz band that accompanies the singers. There are more shots of the crowd, the jazz band, and another fashion show. The film ends with eight young women performing a dance routine on stage.

2012.79.1.12.1b: Original 400 foot metal can. On the outside of the can is an address label identifying the sender as [Chamba Educational Film Services/ P.O. Box 3517/ Brooklyn, New York 11202/ (718) 852-8353]. The recipient is [Hortense Beveridge]. Additional partial information appears to read [No time].

Ages of Time

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Corporate documentary film chronicling the history of timekeeping, edited by African American film editor Hortense Beveridge. "Ages of Time" was produced in 1959 by the Hamilton Watch Company of Lancaster, Pennsylvania and is narrated by renowned actor Burgess Meredith.

2012.79.1.3.1a: 16mm color film.

A People's Convention

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object consists of: 16mm Film (a).

2012.79.1.1.1a: 16mm film. This documentary film covers the 1948 Progressive Party Convention in Philadelphia, PA. Produced by Union Films. This fifteen-minute documentary provides an invaluable record of the Progressive Party’s gathering even as it combines “people’s songs” with film in an innovative, almost experimental manner. As with several earlier Union Films productions, there is some effort to theatricalize events. A People’s Convention has a protagonist, “Joe,” who is attending the convention and is shown in both the introductory and final shot, while making several appearances over the course of the picture. His presence, however, is quickly subsumed by the desire to document the convention, which was all the more urgent given the distortions that were being generated by the news media.

Source: Musser, Charles. "A People’s Convention (Union Films, 1948)." Charles Musser. Accessed May 12, 2016. http://www.charlesmusser.com/?page_id=1672.

9/11: The Heartland Tapes: Sneak Peek

Smithsonian Channel
It happened on the East Coast, but across America, it was very much a local story. News and radio broadcasters gave minute-by-minute reports that we all followed. This is their story. From: 9/11: THE HEARTLAND TAPES http://bit.ly/1nDuww5

9/11: Stories In Fragments: Sneak Peek

Smithsonian Channel
Four airplanes. Nearly three-thousand victims. One unimaginable tragedy. The terrible events of September 11, 2001 will never be forgotten. From the Show 9/11: Stories in Fragments http://bit.ly/2kIp2am
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