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Baby horseshoe crabs eating brine shrimp!

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
These baby horseshoe crabs at SMEE are nearing four months old.

Nine-armed sea star (starfish) on the move!

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Sea stars have hundreds of tiny tube feet which allow them to move using a water vascular system. This species is native to the Indian River Lagoon, as well as the coasts of Florida, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico.

Blue Velvet Sea Slug Eating a Flatworm

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
A blue velvet sea slug (Chelidonura varians) eating a flatworm in SMEE's Pacific ecosystem tank. http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/SmithsonianSMS ... (more info) (less info)

Catshark embryo developing inside egg case! (mermaid's purse)

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Here's a look at our catshark (also known as dogfish) developing inside its egg! The round sphere is the yolk, which it will feed on until it gets strong enough to hatch out of the egg case, also known as a mermaids purse.

Common Octopus returns home!

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
This video shows a common octopus being returned to its natural environment, in the Indian River Lagoon in Fort Pierce, FL. It was collected by one of our Smithsonian researchers seven months ago (May 2014) when it was just the size of a dime, and had been on exhibit in our public Aquarium, where it grew to over a foot in length! Best of luck out there, little one!

Staghorn coral spawning

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
In this video you can see our staghorn coral spawning. Staghorn corals are broadcast spawners, releasing their gametes into the water a few hours after sunset between 2 and 6 days after the full moon in August. While the gamete bundles contain both eggs and sperm, these corals can’t fertilize their own eggs. Unfortunately, all of the Exhibits staghorn corals are clones, so no larvae will be produced. To our knowledge, this is the first time that an Atlantic reef building coral has spawned in an exhibit.

Bamboo Shark's First Swim!

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
This baby banded bamboo shark just hatched from its egg case and we caught its first swim (or scoot, maybe!) around the tank. This Pacific species is popular in the aquarium trade and will soon be donated to a more suitable home!

Snapping Shrimp Burrowing!

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
In the Seagrass model ecosystem in the Smithsonian Marine Ecosystems Exhibit.

Contemporary Daguerreotype Portrait

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Follow the early photographic process of daguerreotype portraiture with contemporary daguerreotypist, Mike Robinson.

Contemporary Daguerreotype of the Capitol

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Follow the early photographic process of making a daguerreotype of the Capitol with contemporary daguerreotypist, Mike Robinson, explaining the technique.

Contemporary Daguerreotype Portrait with Voice Over

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Follow the early photographic process of daguerreotype portraiture with contemporary daguerreotypist, Mike Robinson, explaining the technique.

Part 1: Updated Methods for Digitization of Daguerreotypes

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
A video presentation from the Daguerreian Society Symposium in November 2012 covering imaging techniques for documenting daguerreotypes. Part 1 includes an introduction to the presentation and imaging team, an overview of imaging techniques, and presents scanning as an imaging technique.

Microscopy Sample Preparation Part I: Embedding & Overview of Sample Prep

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
An overview of sample preparation for microscopy starting with labeling and positioning of sample.

Microscopy Sample Preparation Part IV: Polishing

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
The final step in preparing your sample for microscopy involves polishing the samples using aluminum oxide abrasive (12 micron, 5 micron and 1 micron grit sizes) and stoddard solvent.

Interview with Ed about Imaging and Analysis of Daguerreotypes

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
An interview with MCI's Research Scientist, Ed, about imaging and analysis of daguerreotypes.

MCI Textile Conservation Interview (longer version)

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
The Textile Conservator from the Smithsonian's Museum Conservation Institute talks about her conservation work and projects.

Microscopy Sample Preparation Part II: Mounting the Sample

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Using cyanoacrolate to mount sample.

Viewing a Daguerreotype with Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI)

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
This video walks through viewing a daguerreotype using Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI).

Part 2: Updated Methods for Digitization of Daguerreotypes

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
A video presentation from the Daguerreian Society Symposium in November 2012 covering imaging techniques for documenting daguerreotypes. Part 2 includes DSLR photography, the DagHaus, high dynamic range imaging (HDRI), axial specular illumination and reflectance transformation imaging (RTI).

MCI Paintings Conservation Interview (longer version)

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
The Paintings Conservator from the Smithsonian's Museum Conservation Institute talks about her conservation work and projects.

MapArt OpenSource Viewer Presentation

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
MapArt OpenSource Viewer: A Layered Solution for Viewing Scientific Imagery E. Keats Webb, Digital Imaging Specialist at the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute Reed Tomlinson, Chief Technology Officer for MapArt Systems. The MapArt OpenSource Viewer uses GIS based software to layer multiple images of a cultural heritage object in a dynamic and accessible interface allowing conservators and researchers the ability to virtually "walk through" an object in a multispectral and mulitdimensional way.

Five Statues form Ain Ghazal, Jordan

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute staff preserve 9000 year old statues unearthed during road construction in Jordan. Extraordinarily rare plaster statues dating from around 6500 B.C. were discovered in 1985 at the Neolithic site of 'Ain Ghazal, Jordan, on the outskirts of the capitol city Amman. Because of the fragility of the lime plaster, the entire contents of the pit containing the statues were encased in aluminum foil, polyurethane foam, and a wooden crate and sent to the Smithsonian Institution for a seven-year process of laboratory excavation and conservation treatment. The group includes two standing figures measuring around 1 meter in height and three unusual two-headed busts. Filming was done on five occasions from 1990 to 1996 before exhibition of the statues at the Smithsonian's Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in 1996-1997 and their return to Jordan for display at the Jordanian Archaeological Museum on the Citadel in Amman.

MCI Textile Conservation Interview (shorter version)

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
The Textile Conservator from the Smithsonian's Museum Conservation Institute talks about her conservation work and projects.

Rescuing Records

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Rescuing Records: Recognizing the Problems of Preserving Documents in Research Collections
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