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The Alonge Project: Collaborating with the Benin Museum

Smithsonian Institution
When the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art brought one of its exhibitions to Africa for the first time in its history, it not only brought the photography of S.O. Alonge back to his home of Benin City, Nigeria, but also helped renovate the National Museum of Benin and connected community members to their past.

Smithsonian Global

Smithsonian Institution
Learn more at https://global.si.edu/ Footage Courtesy of: Smithsonian Channel George Stoyle Compass Films Camera Klaus Reisinger and U Khin Maunk Gyu Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Interactive Media Concept, Design and Production by Local Projects Pen initial concept Local Projects with Diller Scofidio + Renfro Special Thanks to Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Digital Experience supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies Folklife Festival Videography and Editing: Albert Tong The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage Photos by Joshua Eli Cogan, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives SERC, Hutomo Wicaksono, and the Freer| Sackler Galleries of Asian Art, and the Smithsonian Digitization Program Office.

History Rising: Conner Prairie's Balloon Adventure

Smithsonian Education
Conner Prairie Interactive History Park, Indianas only Smithsonian Affiliate, releases History Rising, A Conner Prairie Balloon Adventure, a film that documents how this cultural landmark is reinventing itself for guests of the 21st century. Featured are the massive preparation and behind-the-scenes insights and risks involved with installation of 1859 Balloon Voyage, a permanent exhibit. Frankly, at first I thought it was a little too far out for Conner Prairie, says Ellen M. Rosenthal, president and CEO of Conner Prairie, when referencing how the idea for1859 Balloon Voyage was born and evaluated more than two years ago. The documentary shows how the exhibit became a reality through collaboration with an international team, Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum consultation, Conner Prairie staff and more than 40 volunteers. Watch the dynamics as everything comes down to the wire to launch of this permanent $2 million exhibit earlier this summer that changes the face of Conner Prairie. There was a lot of excitement and tension-packed moments as Conner Prairie inflated the balloon and built the exhibit, says Michael Husain, owner of Emmy-winning Good Vibes Media, which produced the documentary. The documentary originally aired Thursday, September 17 on WFYI, and DVDs are available at the Conner Prairie Store. © WFYI Productions, Indianapolis Indiana ### Conner Prairie interactive history park, created by Eli Lilly in 1934, is Indianas only Smithsonian affiliate. Families of today engage, explore and discover what it was like to live and play in Indianas past. Explore five themed historic areas on 200 beautiful, wooded acres including the newest exhibit, 1859 Balloon Voyage. This exhibit educates guests about Indianas aviation history and culminates with a voyage 350 feet above the prairie in a tethered helium balloon. Every visit is a unique adventure that provides an authentic look into the history that shapes us today. Admission to Conner Prairie is $12 for adults, $11 for seniors, $8 for youth (ages 2-12) and free for members and children under 2. The balloon voyage fee is $15 for non-members and $12 for members. A $5 off coupon is available at BP am/pm convenience stores. For a list of participating stores or for more information about Conner Prairie visit /www.connerprairie.org or call 317.776.6006 or 800.966.1836.

Get to know the Reginald F. Lewis Museum

Smithsonian Education
The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture is the largest African American museum on the East Coast. The Lewis brings Maryland to the world through its large permanent collection, and the world to Maryland through its dynamic and educational special exhbitions. More info at http://www.africanamericanculture.org/

Leadership and Change #BecauseofHerStory: Smithsonian Affiliations National Conference 2019 Keynote

Smithsonian Education
Conference Welcome, Myriam Springuel, Director, Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service and Smithsonian Affiliations Opening remarks about the Smithsonian's American Women's History Initiative from Julissa Marenco, Assistant Secretary for Communications and External Affairs, Smithsonian Institution In Conversation: Ellen Stofan, John and Adrienne Mars Director, Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum (NASM) will speak with Brenda Gaines, Smithsonian National Board Member and Advisory Board Chair at the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) about leadership, creating change, and nurturing the next generation. Dr. Stofan will provide insights on ways in which she is leading the National Air and Space Museum as it revitalizes and reimagines the museum, and its national presence. As the first woman to lead NASM, Ellen Stofan is no stranger to leading change. She served as NASA’s chief scientist, developed plans to bring humans to Mars, and worked on science policy with President Obama’s science advisor and the National Science and Technology Council. Brenda Gaines retired as President and CEO of Citicorp Diners Club, a member of Citigroup, and served as Deputy Chief of Staff to Chicago's Mayor Harold Washington and as Commissioner of the Department of Housing for the City of Chicago.

Ocean Plastic 2010

Smithsonian Marine Science
Plastic trash in the Ocean

The Barry Farm Goodman League Basketball Team

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
A peak at the Goodman Games late summer 2017. Held in the heart of historic Barry Farm, the Goodman League hosts nightly games all summer long. Here, everyone is "family."

Malcolm X Park Drum Circle

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
Every Sunday the Malcolm X Drummers gather in Meridian Hill Park in Washington DC to celebrate their community and creativity.

Stokely Carmichael Lecture at Howard University, 1972

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
During a lecture to students at Howard University, Stokely Carmichael speaks about the movement of black people toward unity with a clear, common ideology based on science. He stresses black people must put theory into practice - organize and take action. He speaks about the differences between revolutionary and reform movements; Pan-Africanism; the All African People's Revolutionary Party; scientific socialism; nkrumahism; capitalism; and imperialism. ACMA AV003074 d

The Past and Future of DC Chinatown (documentary film, 2018)

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
Once a vibrant Chinese immigrant neighborhood, Washington, DC’s Chinatown is today a bustling business and entertainment district with only about 300 remaining Chinese American residents. While Chinatown first formed in the late 19th century on Pennsylvania Avenue NW within view of the Capitol, it was displaced for the construction of federal and municipal buildings around 1930. After relocating to near 7th and H Streets NW, a new Chinatown grew, but faced continued challenges from major development projects in the decades that followed. This documentary film draws on more than twenty oral history interviews with longtime community members to explore the evolution of this important, but shrinking neighborhood. “The Past and Future of DC Chinatown,” produced in conjunction with the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum’s “A Right to the City” exhibition (April 2018 - April 2020), received federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Chinatown in “A Right to the City” Exhibition at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
Excerpts from oral history interviews about the Chinatown neighborhood of Washington, DC that appear in the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum’s exhibition, “A Right to the City” (April 21, 2018-April 20, 2020). In a moment of rapid population growth and mounting tensions over development, “A Right to the City” explores the history of neighborhood change and civic engagement in the nation’s capital by looking at the dynamic histories of six Washington, D.C., neighborhoods: Adams Morgan, Anacostia, Brookland, Chinatown, Shaw and Southwest. The exhibition tells the story of these communities through the eyes of the Washingtonians who have helped shape these neighborhoods in extraordinary ways. They have used their collective community power to fight for quality public education, healthy and green urban spaces, equitable development and transportation, and a truly democratic approach to city planning. MORE INFORMATION: http://www.anacostia.si.edu/Exhibitions/Details/A-Right-to-the-City-6222 Interviewees include: - Wendy Lim - Harry Guey-Lee - Tom Fong - Harry Chow - Evelyn Moy

Stokely Carmichael Lecture at Howard University, 1972

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
With students during a seminar, Stokely Carmichael discusses principles, ideologies, and tactics of capitalism, socialism, nkrumahism, and imperialism. He talks extensively about race; and socialist and capitalist societies and systems. He also speaks about reform movements versus revolutionary movements; Pan-Africanism; scientific socialism; bringing African Revolution to socialism; the Black Panthers; and the All African People's Revolutionary Party. ACMA AV003090 d

Anacostia in “A Right to the City” Exhibition at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
Excerpts from oral history interviews about the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington, DC that appear in the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum’s exhibition, “A Right to the City” (April 21, 2018-April 20, 2020). In a moment of rapid population growth and mounting tensions over development, “A Right to the City” explores the history of neighborhood change and civic engagement in the nation’s capital by looking at the dynamic histories of six Washington, D.C., neighborhoods: Adams Morgan, Anacostia, Brookland, Chinatown, Shaw and Southwest. The exhibition tells the story of these communities through the eyes of the Washingtonians who have helped shape these neighborhoods in extraordinary ways. They have used their collective community power to fight for quality public education, healthy and green urban spaces, equitable development and transportation, and a truly democratic approach to city planning. MORE INFORMATION: http://www.anacostia.si.edu/Exhibitions/Details/A-Right-to-the-City-6222 Interviewees include: - Arrington Dixon, native Anacostian, elected to the first DC City Council (1974), and co-founder and former chairman of the Anacostia Coordinating Council (ACC) - Sheila Cogan, former Far Southeast DC resident, member of the first integrated class at John Philip Sousa Junior High School - Rosalind Styles, native Anacostian and longtime neighborhood advocate

Stokley Carmichael Lecture at Howard University, 1972

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
During a lecture to students at Howard University, Stokely Carmichael speaks about the movement of black people toward unity with a clear, common ideology based on science. He stresses black people must put theory into practice - organize and take action. He speaks about the differences between revolutionary and reform movements; Pan-Africanism; the All African People's Revolutionary Party; scientific socialism; nkrumahism; capitalism; and imperialism. ACMA AV003075 d

Brookland in “A Right to the City” Exhibition at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
Excerpts from oral history interviews about the Brookland neighborhood of Washington, DC that appear in the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum’s exhibition, “A Right to the City” (April 21, 2018-April 20, 2020). In a moment of rapid population growth and mounting tensions over development, “A Right to the City” explores the history of neighborhood change and civic engagement in the nation’s capital by looking at the dynamic histories of six Washington, D.C., neighborhoods: Adams Morgan, Anacostia, Brookland, Chinatown, Shaw and Southwest. The exhibition tells the story of these communities through the eyes of the Washingtonians who have helped shape these neighborhoods in extraordinary ways. They have used their collective community power to fight for quality public education, healthy and green urban spaces, equitable development and transportation, and a truly democratic approach to city planning. MORE INFORMATION: http://www.anacostia.si.edu/Exhibitions/Details/A-Right-to-the-City-6222 Interviewees include: - John Feeley Jr., a longtime Brookland resident, neighborhood advocate, and ANC Commissioner - Susan Abbott, daughter of Sammie Abbott who was a major anti-freeway organizer and the co-founder of the Emergency Committee on the Transportation Crisis (ECTC)

Stokely Carmichael: Black People Must Organize, 1977 (Part 1)

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
At Bethlehem Baptist Church in Anacostia, Washington, DC., Stokely Carmichael leads a discussion on ways to organize people. He stresses the responsibility of each person to organize people to achieve goal. He explains the power possible when people are properly organized. ACMA AV003065 d

Shaw - “A Right to the City” Exhibition

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
Excerpts from oral history interviews about the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, DC that appear in the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum’s exhibition, “A Right to the City” (2018-2020). In a moment of rapid population growth and mounting tensions over development, “A Right to the City” explores the history of neighborhood change and civic engagement in the nation’s capital by looking at the dynamic histories of six Washington, D.C., neighborhoods: Adams Morgan, Anacostia, Brookland, Chinatown, Shaw and Southwest. The exhibition tells the story of these communities through the eyes of the Washingtonians who have helped shape these neighborhoods in extraordinary ways. They have used their collective community power to fight for quality public education, healthy and green urban spaces, equitable development and transportation, and a truly democratic approach to city planning. MORE INFORMATION: http://www.anacostia.si.edu/Exhibitions/Details/A-Right-to-the-City-6222 Interviewees include: - William T. Fauntroy, Jr., Shaw native, Tuskegee Airman, first African American civil engineer hired by National Capital Transportation Agency, and older brother of Rev. Walter Fauntroy - Dominic Moulden, Resource Organizer for ONE DC (Organizing Neighborhood Equity)

Ruth and Novell Sullivan, Fairlawn Neighborhood

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
An interview with Fairlawn residents Ruth and Novell Sullivan.

DC Artist Amber Robles-Gordon

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
An interview with Washington, DC fiber artist Amber Robles-Gordon about her work and process.

Southwest DC - “A Right to the City” Exhibition

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
xcerpts from oral history interviews about the Southwest neighborhood of Washington, DC that appear in the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum’s exhibition, “A Right to the City” (2018- 2020). In a moment of rapid population growth and mounting tensions over development, “A Right to the City” explores the history of neighborhood change and civic engagement in the nation’s capital by looking at the dynamic histories of six Washington, D.C., neighborhoods: Adams Morgan, Anacostia, Brookland, Chinatown, Shaw and Southwest. The exhibition tells the story of these communities through the eyes of the Washingtonians who have helped shape these neighborhoods in extraordinary ways. They have used their collective community power to fight for quality public education, healthy and green urban spaces, equitable development and transportation, and a truly democratic approach to city planning. MORE INFORMATION: http://www.anacostia.si.edu/Exhibitions/Details/A-Right-to-the-City-6222 Interviewees include: - Roberta Patrick, native Southwester and longtime staff member of the Southwest Community House - Neal Peirce, longtime Southwest resident and co-founder of the Southwest Neighborhood Assembly (SWNA)

Metropolitan Washington: A New Immigrant Gateway (Keynote by Dr. Audrey Singer)

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
Revisiting Our Black Mosaic The Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum, in partnership with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, hosted a full day of discussions on race, immigration, gentrification, education, museums, and community in the Washington D.C. metro area on September 19, 2014. KEYNOTE ADDRESS METROPOLITAN WASHINGTON: A NEW IMMIGRANT GATEWAY Introduction: Dr. Ariana A Curtis, Curator of Latino Studies and event organizer, Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum Keynote Speaker: Dr. Audrey Singer, Senior Fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program, Brookings Institution BACKGROUND BM20ACM.eventbrite.com The program references the museum’s 1994 landmark exhibition Black Mosaic, a multicultural, multilingual exhibition which examined race, nationality, and ethnicity of black immigrants in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. 20 years have passed since the Black Mosaic exhibition, and in that time both the local and national contexts have changed. Formerly predominately “Black” cities, like Washington, D.C., are changing in demographic composition. Immigration is a hotly debated national issue. Latinos have come to outnumber African-Americans as the largest minority in the United States. Native-born Black populations are declining while African immigrant populations have hit an all-time high. To address these important topics the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum, in partnership with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, hosted a full day of discussions on race, immigration, gentrification, education, museums, and community in the Washington D.C. metro area Revisiting Our Black Mosaic Symposium September 19, 2014 9:00am – 4:30pm Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center One Woodrow Wilson Plaza - 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20004-3027 The Revisiting Our Black Mosaic Symposium received financial support from: • Anacostia Community Museum • Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars • Latino Initiatives Pool, a federal fund administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center • National Museum of African American History and Culture • Smithsonian Consortium for Understanding the American Experience • Smithsonian Consortium for Valuing World Cultures

Adams Morgan - “A Right to the City” Exhibition

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
Excerpts from oral history interviews about the Adams Morgan neighborhood of Washington, DC that appear in the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum’s exhibition, “A Right to the City” (2018- 2020). In a moment of rapid population growth and mounting tensions over development, “A Right to the City” explores the history of neighborhood change and civic engagement in the nation’s capital by looking at the dynamic histories of six Washington, D.C., neighborhoods: Adams Morgan, Anacostia, Brookland, Chinatown, Shaw and Southwest. The exhibition tells the story of these communities through the eyes of the Washingtonians who have helped shape these neighborhoods in extraordinary ways. They have used their collective community power to fight for quality public education, healthy and green urban spaces, equitable development and transportation, and a truly democratic approach to city planning. MORE INFORMATION: http://www.anacostia.si.edu/Exhibitions/Details/A-Right-to-the-City-6222 Interviewees include: - Mary Pierce, brother of Walter Pierce - Ronald Pierce, co-founder of the Ontario Lakers Youth Organization and brother of Walter Pierce - Topper Carew, filmmaker, SNCC activist, and founder of The New Thing Art & Architecture Center - Marie Nahikian, co-founder and first executive director of the Adams Morgan Organization (AMO)

Where International Becomes Local: Immigration in the DC Metro Area

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
Revisiting Our Black Mosaic Symposium The Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum, in partnership with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, hosted a full day of discussions on race, immigration, gentrification, education, museums, and community in the Washington D.C. metro area on September 19, 2014 WHERE INTERNATIONAL BECOMES LOCAL: IMMIGRATION IN THE DC METRO AREA: a conversation about the diversity of the DC metro area population, with specific attention to immigration. Audience Q&A follows the panel. Panelists: • Mwiza Munthali Public Outreach Director, TransAfrica • Kristian Ramos Public Relations Officer, Office on Latino Affairs. Executive Office of Mayor Vincent C. Gray, Government of the District of Columbia • Dr. Heran Sereke-Brhan Deputy Director, Office on African Affairs. Executive Office of Mayor Vincent C. Gray, Government of the District of Columbia • Moderator: Dr. Patricia Foxen Deputy Director of Research, National Council of La Raza BACKGROUND BM20ACM.eventbrite.com The program references the museum’s 1994 landmark exhibition Black Mosaic, a multicultural, multilingual exhibition which examined race, nationality, and ethnicity of black immigrants in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. 20 years have passed since the Black Mosaic exhibition, and in that time both the local and national contexts have changed. Formerly predominately “Black” cities, like Washington, D.C., are changing in demographic composition. Immigration is a hotly debated national issue. Latinos have come to outnumber African-Americans as the largest minority in the United States. Native-born Black populations are declining while African immigrant populations have hit an all-time high. To address these important topics the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum, in partnership with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, hosted a full day of discussions on race, immigration, gentrification, education, museums, and community in the Washington D.C. metro area. Revisiting Our Black Mosaic Symposium September 19, 2014 9:00am – 4:30pm Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center One Woodrow Wilson Plaza - 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20004-3027 The Revisiting Our Black Mosaic Symposium received financial support from: • Anacostia Community Museum • Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars • Latino Initiatives Pool, a federal fund administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center • National Museum of African American History and Culture • Smithsonian Consortium for Understanding the American Experience • Smithsonian Consortium for Valuing World Cultures

Rodney Mullen on Innovation

Lemelson Center, National Museum of American History
In August of 2012, the Lemelson Center invited Rodney Mullen, the unquestioned leader and pioneer of street skating, to visit us to discuss the role of invention and innovation in American life. We exchanged ideas and views not only about skateboarding, but about the role and importance of creativity and innovation to building a better society.
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