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SUCCM: Artists' Community Workshops with Local Indigenous Artists

National Museum of the American Indian
In 2014, the Southern Ute Cultural Center and Museum in Ignacio, Colorado, coordinated a series of community workshops for local Indigenous artists. Part of the National Museum of the American Indian's Artist Leadership Program for Museums and Cultural Organizations, the workshops were led by Conrad Thompson (Southern Ute), Morningstar Tapia (Pojoaque), Patrick Tso (Navajo), and Esther Belin (Navajo). Workshop topics included painting mini hand drums, collage as a medium for self-expression, creating ledger drawings that evoke the goodness in life, and a working together to write a series of linked poems called renga. Video produced and directed by Avatu-napach (Tallas Cantsee). To learn more about the Artist Leadership Program, see /http://americanindian.si.edu/conn…/artist-leadership-program.

Oliver Wang: Music as Community and Social Power

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Music journalist and scholar Oliver Wang talks about music as a source of community-building in this interview at the 2016 Folklife Festival. Wang had accompanied hip-hop artists from Los Angeles and the Bay Area as part of the "Sounds of California" program. Videography: John Wetmore Production: Elisa Hough Sound Recordist: Helen Lehrer Editing: Alexis Ligon [Catalog No. CFV10848; Copyright 2016 Smithsonian Institution]

Colombia Dispatch 4: Palenque: An Afro-Colombian Community

Smithsonian Magazine

Centuries ago, escaped slaves built isolated forts in the jungles that surround Cartagena, once Colombia's main port for incoming slaves. Today, the Afro-Colombian inhabitants of San Basilio de Palenque, a village just over an hour from Cartagena, have preserved many of the customs of their African ancestors.

I wander around the dusty streets and of the small town on a scorching hot day, listening to residents speaking a local Creole tongue. A mixture of African languages with Spanish and Portuguese, it sounds a lot like the Bantu languages of central Africa. Although the town now has electricity and running water in most homes, locals still gather at the creek to wash clothes, chat and bathe. In the center of town there's a statue of town founder Benkos Bioho breaking out of chains. Locals say he established Palenque in 1603 with 36 other escaped slaves.

While most other strongholds for escaped slaves eventually fell, this one survived because of its isolation among the hills and swamps about 30 miles outside Cartagena. Locals claim that in 1713 the inhabitants declared it the first independent community in the Americas. Escaped slaves would head to Palenque, knowing that was their chance at freedom. But several decades ago, that same isolation led residents, called Palenqueros, to leave the village for big cities in search of work.

Today, colorfully dressed Palenquera women commute to Cartagena to sell candy and fruit on the streets, while many men work in construction and paving roads. But when Palenqueros first arrived in the cities they encountered racism and were mocked for their strange language. Out of embarrassment, many refrained from observing their traditional customs.

Near the town square, I sat down with Edwin Valdez Hernandez, a charismatic young instructor at the Batata Dance and Music School in Palenque. He tells me that in the 1980s and ‘90s a new generation of young, educated Palenqueros fostered a resurgence in pride in the community's African roots.

"We defend our values with a shout," Valdez says. "We are black, and we are defending our culture."

He believes this pride is essential to combating the racism he says still flourishes on the Colombian coast. His friend, Enrique Marques, agrees, "If you lose your culture, you become a slave again."

The town's public school now teaches Palenque's traditional language to all students.

For the past 10 years, a group of dance enthusiasts has scraped together enough donations to run a Batata school in a small blue concrete house a few blocks from the town center. Valdez says the school's 150 students, from elementary school age to teenagers, meet Monday through Friday afternoons to practice Palenque's traditional dances, passed down through the centuries from Africa. They've performed at festivals across the country, including Palenque's famous yearly drum festival in October. I walk down to the school with Valdez and a dozen of his students and head out into the hot dirt courtyard where they practice. Students pound on wooden drums of all shapes and sizes while Valdez leads chants about the town's history.

Teenage boys and girls wearing yellow, blue and red costumes (Colombia's national colors) perform highly charged dances inspired by their African roots. At the end of the 10-minute song, sweat drips off everyone and dust covers the dancers. I shake their hands as they file out. Determined to keep his culture alive, Valdez yells out toward them with the command of a football coach as they leave.

"I want everybody back here for practice at 5:30 sharp."

Image by Kenneth R. Fletcher. Students at Palenque’s Batata Dance and Music School perform a traditional dance with African roots. (original image)

Image by Kenneth R. Fletcher. Students at Palenque’s Batata Dance and Music School perform a traditional dance with African roots. (original image)

Image by Kenneth R. Fletcher. Students at Palenque’s Batata Dance and Music School perform a traditional dance with African roots. (original image)

Image by Kenneth R. Fletcher. Students at Palenque’s Batata Dance and Music School perform a traditional dance with African roots. (original image)

Image by Kenneth R. Fletcher. A boy stops along a dusty Palenque street. (original image)

Image by Kenneth R. Fletcher. A street in Palenque. (original image)

Image by Kenneth R. Fletcher. A statue of town founder Benkos Bioho sits in Palenque’s main square. (original image)

Broom used by the community members to clean-up after Baltimore protests

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Wood and straw broom used in clean up efforts after the Baltimore Riots of 2015 at North and Pennsylvania Avenues. The broom has a straw head attached to a wooden handle with wire. The handle is gray.

Cross-Border Community Station: A Reciprocal Knowledge Platform

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
How do we raise awareness of the common interests between divided cities? This video is featured in the exhibition 'By the People: Designing a Better America,' on view at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum September 2016–February 2017. Learn more at /www.cooperhewitt.org/channel/by-the-people. Video by Estudio Cruz + Forman. Courtesy of Estudio Teddy Cruz + Forman. THIS VIDEO HAS NO SOUND.

Benceslado Faninango, Governor of Community, Wearing Poncho n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Black and white photoprint

Time Travel: Producing the Campus and Community Timeline

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
The Timeline is on display outside the Reunion Hall tent (facing Madison Drive, near 12th Street). Photo by James Mayer
The Timeline is on display outside the Reunion Hall tent (facing Madison Drive, near 12th Street). Photo by James Mayer
Photo by James Mayer

The Campus and Community program features a detailed and instructive timeline of events related to the history of public and land-grant universities and the USDA. This installation of graphic panels is located by the Reunion Hall tent. A team of interns conducted the research and compiled the content. Two of them, Shannon Carney (a student at Kent State University) and Mary Ellen Dingley (a recent graduate of George Washington University) share their reflections on this experience.

Shannon Carney explains:

This past spring during my internship, I helped with the preparation for the Campus and Community Folklife Festival program. Along with two fellow interns, I was tasked with creating a timeline of events from 1862 to present. My supervisor, the fearless curator of Campus and Community, Betty Belanus, explained that the timeline should link land-grant university history to American history, showing how they have affected each other. There would be sixteen panels, one for each decade since 1860, and an introduction panel.

This project was daunting because a lot has happened over the last 150 years. As a history major, I know that brevity in historical writing is not easily attained. And for our timeline, each decade would have to be summarized in fifty words, with a few bullet points and pictures.

In any case, we began creating the mock-ups for each panel. I struggled with writing the briefs at first, because I felt that if I left some events out, the story we were telling would lose its meaning. However, through teamwork we were able to create concise, informative briefs.

Over the course of this process, I became extremely invested in many of the stories. One story in particular was that of Iowa State’s first African American football player, Jack Trice. Trice, who had been discriminated against by others in his sport, was mortally wounded during his first game. After reading about Trice I actually cried; but his was not the only touching story. I was also moved and inspired by stories of the all-Japanese American regiment from the University of Hawai`i that fought valiantly in World War II and by Montana State’s feminist protestors in the 1930s. The experiences of these students made me realize that the Campus and Community Festival program is paying tribute to  an important part of American history. This program highlights the educational and cultural achievements of land-grant universities. Most importantly, it illuminates the forgotten stories of students whose passion for service, innovation, and improvement embodies the land-grant mission.

-----------------------------------

Mary Ellen Dingley adds:

Photo courtesy of Iowa State University
From the 1940 Timeline entry: With many young men in uniform, more women received technical training to help with the war effort, including these engineering cadettes at Iowa State University. To be eligible for the program, young women needed to be over eighteen, have reached their sophomore year, and have taken at least one mathematics course. They were paid ten dollars per week.
Photo courtesy of Iowa State University

Researching the timeline was an immense assignment – I sometimes became lost for hours, meandering down the trails of history, searching after one individual’s story, trying to verify some facts, or chasing after the perfect photograph. We revised, edited, added to, cut from and carefully contemplated each decade. The timeline became, to me, almost a living project. There were the problem children (what in the world happened in the 1870s?) and the golden children (the 1940s were chock full of events!) and always, the intriguing stories and exciting characters. The University of West Virginia’s first graduate had the fantastic name of Marmaduke Dent, and a fantastic beard to go with it. The students at the University of Illinois boycotted local restaurants in 1946 until they forced them to end their practices of racial discrimination. Who knew?

It’s amazing to see these hours of research transformed into a tangible product. We watched as the design team created miniatures of the huge timeline banners that are now on display on the festival site. The timeline research was at times frustrating and always interesting (as well as a useful review of United States history!). The banners provide visitors a smooth introduction to the land-grant universities, but to me, knowing the weeks of work behind the glossy photos and facts, they also give a bit of well-earned pride.

Photographs re Malayan Community Development with Text 1959

National Anthropological Archives
Black and white photoprint

Metropolitan Los Angeles: One Community by Mel Scott

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Upper half of page, photograph of Los Angeles. Lower left, map of city.

Losar: Community Building and the Bhutanese New Year

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

The Bhutanese New Year’s festival, called Losar, is celebrated between February and March depending on the lunar calendar. In 2013 Losar falls on February 11-12. This festival holiday is marked by ritual feasting and family gatherings, as well as offerings of thanksgiving and for an auspicious year to come.

The specifics of Losar celebrations differ between regions in Bhutan and from similar Losar celebrations in neighboring Tibet. The food eaten during Losar and its preparation, presentation, consumption, and symbolic meaning are highly important traditional rituals that serve to reinforce community ties and Bhutanese identity and culture.

The modern celebration of Losar in Bhutan originated in 1637, when Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal (1594-1651), the unifier of Bhutan, marked the completion of the famous Punakha dzong (temple) with an inaugural celebration. Bhutanese came from all over the country to bring offerings of produce from their various regions, a tradition that is still reflected in the wide variety of foods consumed during the ritual Losar meals.

Often, Losar celebrations include a traditional morning meal, which is timed to coincide with the rising of the sun, as well as a midday meal and afternoon snack. Food such as fried biscuits (tshos); mandarins; diced sugar cane; fermented rice (changkoi); various stews, porridges, and cheeses; different teas and special sweets (shudre) are all traditionally consumed. Sugar cane and green bananas are considered auspicious foods, the presence of which helps to ensure the New Year will be a good one.

Bhutanese hold archery competitions (archery is their national sport), and play darts and other games. Families picnic, people dance and sing, and offerings are made.

2008 Folklife Festival
His Royal Highness the Prince of Bhutan Jigyel Ugyen Wangchuck practices archery during the Bhutan program at the 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival.
Photo by Laraine Weschler, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives

In past years, Losar reinforced communal ties and hierarchical social relationships. Wealthy Bhutanese families would provide a ritual feast for the community—providing food, entertainment, and offerings for servants, townspeople, dependents, and other community members. During Losar, people ate special foods—delicacies available only during the festival and purchased by the wealthy. Many Bhutanese also received new clothes at Losar—a once a year event.

Traditional rituals of Losar ensured that wealthy “patrons” were assured the loyalty of their dependents. Friends and equals reaffirmed goodwill, and dependents sent gifts and offerings to their patrons to demonstrate the continuation of their relationship. Identity was reinforced through the traditional roles each member of the community was expected to fulfill. That being said, Losar was also a time when the wealthy families and their dependents gathered together to eat, sing, dance, and play games together.

Society in Bhutan has changed considerably, since the 1950s especially. Bhutan transitioned from a traditional monarchy to a democratically elected parliament in 2008, which coincided with the Bhutan: Land of the Thunder Dragon program at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Food that was once rare or extremely expensive is now available year-round, and clothes can be purchased at any time. Some of the unique traditions that made Losar special for past generations no longer hold the same meaning. For example, today the celebration of Losar is no longer shaped by semi-feudal social dynamics.

It is, however, still a holiday of feasting, singing, dancing, archery, and offerings. It is a special time when Bhutanese gather and renew their ties with friends, family, and the wider community, celebrating the cultural traditions of Bhutan and hoping for an auspicious New Year together. As demonstrated during the 2008 Bhutan: Land of the Thunder Dragon Folklife Festival program, Bhutanese strongly value their heritage, traditions, and culture.

Louisiana program at the 1985 Folklife Festival
His Royal Highness Prince Jigyel Ugyen Wangchuck watches the closing ceremonies of the 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival.
Photo by Laraine Weschler, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives
Louisiana program at the 1985 Folklife Festival
A Bhutanese monk pours water during the Bhutanese procession in honor of Smithsonian staff and volunteers at the 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival.
Photo by Laraine Weschler, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives
Louisiana program at the 1985 Folklife Festival
The sun sets on the 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival site.
Photo by Laraine Weschler, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives
Louisiana program at the 1985 Folklife Festival
A participant demonstrates traditional Bhutanese embroidery at the 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival.
Photo by Ken Rahaim, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives

James Mayer is an intern at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. He was a Fulbright Fellow in Turkey for the 2011-2012 academic year and is a graduate of Macalester College, where he studied History and Classics.

References

Ardussi, John, and Françoise Pommaret. Bhutan: Traditions and Changes. Leiden, the Netherlands: Brill Academic Publishers, 2007. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), EBSCOhost (accessed February 1, 2013).

Choden, Kunzang. “Lo Gsar Celebration: the Significance of Food in the Noble and Religious Family of O Rgyan Chos Gling (Central Bhutan).” In Bhutan: Traditions and Changes, edited by John Ardussi and Françoise Pommaret, 27-43. Leiden, the Netherlands: Brill Academic Publishers, 2007. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), EBSCOhost (accessed February 1, 2013).

National Holidays of Bhutan | Water Female Snake Year 2013.” Bhutan Tourism Corporation, Ltd. and Far Flung Places LLC. (accessed February 1, 2013)

Scott, Preston. “Bhutan at the 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival.” Talk Story 34,(Fall 2008): 3-4,19.

Scott, Preston. “Restaging Bhutan.” Talk Story 35 (Spring 2009): 6.

Tourism Council of Bhutan.” Tourism Council of Bhutan (accessed February 1, 2013)

Thousands of Invasive Cane Toads Overtake Florida Community

Smithsonian Magazine

Over the weekend, thousands of poisonous baby cane toads emerged from canals or leapt out of retention ponds in several Palm Beach Gardens neighborhoods along the Atlantic coast of Florida.

The giant knot—which is the name for a collective group of cane toads—likely settled in after mild winter temperatures and recent rains set the toads up for a booming breeding cycle, with thousands of baby toads reaching maturity around the same time, reports Chad Gillis at USA Today.

The species, Rhinella marina, used to be known at Bufo marinus, and many people still refer to the cane toads as bufo toads. A native of Central and South America, the species first made it to Florida in the 1930s in an effort to control sugar cane pests. In 1955, a pet dealer accidentally released about 100 toads at an airport, reports Eli Rosenberg at The Washington Post. Additional releases in the 1960s also helped establish wild populations of the toad in parts of the state.

Cane toads can be dangerous to pets and wildlife. According to the University of Florida Wildlife Extension, the species releases a toxic substance from a parotoid gland behind its ears. The toxin is strong enough to kill cats or dogs that munch on the toads and can cause burning eyes or skin irritation in humans that handle the critters.

The biggest concern, however, is the environmental damage they can cause. The species breeds year round and has a pretty unrestricted diet for an amphibian: it eats everything. They nosh on pet food, food scraps, carrion and just about every type of insect there is, reducing food available for other species. They also prey on smaller native species of frogs, toads, snakes and mammals. When local predators try to eat them, they are often poisoned by the toads. In many ways, the cane toad is a one-species ecological wrecking ball.

Australia has been particularly bull-dozed by the toads. In 1935, 101 of the amphibians were released in the tropical north of the country to help control beetles attacking sugar cane. In less than 100 years, the species has multiplied to over 2 billion toads and the horde is marching westward, threatening the continent’s endangered lizards and mammals.

In Palm Beach Gardens, the current problem isn’t impact on natural habitat, it’s simply the sheer quantity of toads that have emerged. In some areas, people can’t walk outside or drive for fear of squashing the amphibians. There are so many they are even clogging pool filters.

“I just see a massive amount of toads or frogs everywhere, covering every square inch,” Jenni Quasha, who lives in the Mirabella neighborhood, tells NBC affiliate WPTV. “You can’t even walk through the grass without stepping on one. I’m worried about people’s pets, so there’s definitely no swimming in the pool or playing outside and enjoying the outdoors.”

Mark Holladay, a lead technician with local extermination service Toad Busters, tells WPTV that the swarm-like conditions aren’t likely to go away soon. “There will be another influx like this in 22 days when the next batch hatches out, and this is in every community in Florida.”

The toads have also become established in Hawaii, Guam and Puerto Rico, where they were also introduced to control sugar cane pests. A small population of cane toads is found in the Rio Grande Valley in far southern Texas, which is the most northern point of their native range.

Anacostia in “A Right to the City” Exhibition at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
Excerpts from oral history interviews about the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington, DC that appear in the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum’s exhibition, “A Right to the City” (April 21, 2018-April 20, 2020). In a moment of rapid population growth and mounting tensions over development, “A Right to the City” explores the history of neighborhood change and civic engagement in the nation’s capital by looking at the dynamic histories of six Washington, D.C., neighborhoods: Adams Morgan, Anacostia, Brookland, Chinatown, Shaw and Southwest. The exhibition tells the story of these communities through the eyes of the Washingtonians who have helped shape these neighborhoods in extraordinary ways. They have used their collective community power to fight for quality public education, healthy and green urban spaces, equitable development and transportation, and a truly democratic approach to city planning. MORE INFORMATION: http://www.anacostia.si.edu/Exhibitions/Details/A-Right-to-the-City-6222 Interviewees include: - Arrington Dixon, native Anacostian, elected to the first DC City Council (1974), and co-founder and former chairman of the Anacostia Coordinating Council (ACC) - Sheila Cogan, former Far Southeast DC resident, member of the first integrated class at John Philip Sousa Junior High School - Rosalind Styles, native Anacostian and longtime neighborhood advocate

Chinatown in “A Right to the City” Exhibition at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
Excerpts from oral history interviews about the Chinatown neighborhood of Washington, DC that appear in the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum’s exhibition, “A Right to the City” (April 21, 2018-April 20, 2020). In a moment of rapid population growth and mounting tensions over development, “A Right to the City” explores the history of neighborhood change and civic engagement in the nation’s capital by looking at the dynamic histories of six Washington, D.C., neighborhoods: Adams Morgan, Anacostia, Brookland, Chinatown, Shaw and Southwest. The exhibition tells the story of these communities through the eyes of the Washingtonians who have helped shape these neighborhoods in extraordinary ways. They have used their collective community power to fight for quality public education, healthy and green urban spaces, equitable development and transportation, and a truly democratic approach to city planning. MORE INFORMATION: http://www.anacostia.si.edu/Exhibitions/Details/A-Right-to-the-City-6222 Interviewees include: - Wendy Lim - Harry Guey-Lee - Tom Fong - Harry Chow - Evelyn Moy

Brookland in “A Right to the City” Exhibition at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
Excerpts from oral history interviews about the Brookland neighborhood of Washington, DC that appear in the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum’s exhibition, “A Right to the City” (April 21, 2018-April 20, 2020). In a moment of rapid population growth and mounting tensions over development, “A Right to the City” explores the history of neighborhood change and civic engagement in the nation’s capital by looking at the dynamic histories of six Washington, D.C., neighborhoods: Adams Morgan, Anacostia, Brookland, Chinatown, Shaw and Southwest. The exhibition tells the story of these communities through the eyes of the Washingtonians who have helped shape these neighborhoods in extraordinary ways. They have used their collective community power to fight for quality public education, healthy and green urban spaces, equitable development and transportation, and a truly democratic approach to city planning. MORE INFORMATION: http://www.anacostia.si.edu/Exhibitions/Details/A-Right-to-the-City-6222 Interviewees include: - John Feeley Jr., a longtime Brookland resident, neighborhood advocate, and ANC Commissioner - Susan Abbott, daughter of Sammie Abbott who was a major anti-freeway organizer and the co-founder of the Emergency Committee on the Transportation Crisis (ECTC)

Archiving a Community’s Stories: The Dale-Patterson Family Collection

Smithsonian Education
The Anacostia Community Museum explores the lives and stories of everyday people as a lens to understand a rapidly changing community. Here, archivist Jennifer Morris and artist, community historian, and donor Dianne Dale discuss how the Dale-Patterson Family Collection tells the story of four generations of the family, giving context to the larger story of the Anacostia neighborhood community.

Opening event, South Side Community Art Center, Chicago, Illinois

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm.

Soil bacterial community succession during long-term ecosystem development

Smithsonian Libraries
The physicochemical and biological gradients of soil and vegetative succession along the Franz Josef chronosequence in New Zealand were used to test whether bacterial communities show patterns of change associated with long-term ecosystem development. Pyrosequencing was conducted on soil-derived 16S rRNA genes at nine stages of ecosystem progression and retrogression, ranging in age from 60 to c. 120 000 years since glacial retreat. Bray–Curtis ordination indicated that the bacterial communities showed clear patterns of change that were closely aligned with ecosystem development, pedogenesis and vegetative succession (Mantel test; r = 0.58; P < 0.001). Eighty per cent (80%) of the explained variability in bacterial community structure was observed during the first c. 1000 years of development, when bacterial richness (Simpson's 1/D) declined from 130 to 30. The relatively high turnover of soil bacterial communities corresponded with an integrative 'plant–microbial successional feedback' model that predicts primarily negative feedbacks between plants and soil bacterial communities during progression and early pedogenesis. Positive feedbacks, similar to those of the plant community, could explain the long periods of community stability during later retrogressive stages of ecosystem development. This hypothesized model provides a consistent description linking belowground communities to ecosystem development and succession. The research, using deep sequencing technology, provides the first evidence for soil bacterial community change associated with the process of long-term ecosystem development. How these bacterial community changes are linked to the processes of primary ecosystem succession is not known and needs further investigation.

Luce Unplugged Community Showcase: Five Questions + One with Feedel Band

Smithsonian American Art Museum
ThumbnailOn January 27, Feedel Band and Insect Factory will perform at our Winter Luce Unplugged Community Showcase in the Luce Foundation Center.

Exploring Dr. Frederick Douglass Patterson's papers with Anacostia Community Museum

Smithsonian Institution
On 16 February 2017, we joined Anacostia Community Museum and Ms. Dianne Dale to learn more about Dr. Frederick Douglass Patterson in a Facebook Live event. Ms. Dale connected the establishment of the Anacostia Community with support of the Freedmen's Bureau to the establishment of black education, business, and social structures. She also reinforced the significance of archival documentation to preserving the stories and history of communities that have dissipated following changing economic and social circumstances. During the talk, we saw events, correspondence, innovations, determination, and care emerge from the papers of Dr. Patterson. Note: thank you for your patience with some of the sound and image quality, as this was recorded by Facebook Live livestreaming. A community historian, writer, and stained glass artist, Ms. Dianne Dale provides illustrated lectures on the Freedmen's Bureau and HBCUs; DC and Anacostia history including the Barry Farm Freedmen's Village in SE DC. She also presents views into black education after the Civil War - including the work of her "Uncle Fred," Dr. Patterson. During #BlackHistoryMonth, the Smithsonian Transcription Center is collaborating with Anacostia Community Museum and Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture to transcribe projects relating to education and theater. You can contribute to our #TCBlackHistoryMonth projects, including Dr. Patterson's papers, here: https://transcription.si.edu/black-history-month-2017

Using the History Explorers Group in the Thinkfinity Community

National Museum of American History
This video provides instructions on finding and using the History Explorers group within the Thinkfinity Community.

Luce Unplugged Community Showcase with Art Sorority for Girls

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Video from the Luce Unplugged Community Showcase on February 6, 2015. Visitors enjoyed sets by local bands Art Sorority for Girls and lowercase letters, which were selected with the help of the Washington City Paper. Presented with Washington City Paper.
121-144 of 124,481 Resources