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Found 2,011 Collections

 

AIM and BPP

The following collection acts as a supplemental resource for the Power of the People: Intersectionality of the American Indian Movement and the Black Panther Party 12th grade lesson plan. 

Kenlontae' Turner
65
 

Air and Space Symbols

This collection explores our nation's symbols and how mission and squadron patches incorporate symbolism in their design.  Students are then encouraged to create their own patch.

Grade 1 Social Studies: Civic Values 1.2

Students identify and describe the symbols, icons, songs, and traditions of the United States that exemplify cherished ideals and provide continuity and a sense of community across time. 

Keywords: #airandspace, National Air and Space Museum, NASM, patch, logo, symbol, Tuskegee airmen, 

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
21
 

Air technology of World War I

Technological advancements contributed to World War I costing more money and killing more people than all previous wars in history.

Students will be able to answer the question: What kinds technology existed during the First World war and what were their impacts on the war?

Leah Knecht
12
 

Airmail Service Begins - May 15, 1918

The nation's first regularly scheduled airmail service began on May 15, 1918. Planes carried mail between Washington, DC, Philadelphia and New York City. The Post Office Department worked with the U.S. Army to run the service, using army pilots and planes for the first three months of operations. In August 1918 the Post Office took complete control of the service and ran it until 1927. Routes grew to include service between New York and Chicago, then a transcontinental route between New York and San Francisco.  The Department added beacon towers and lights on aircraft and landing fields to permit night flights.


By 1927 when the Post Office had turned all of the airmail service over to private contractors, a system was in place that set the stage for the successful growth of the nation's commercial aviation system.




airmail, aviation, Jenny, JN-4H, Bustleton, Woodrow Wilson, Burleson, Praeger, Reuben Fleet, Boyle, Edgerton, Webb

Hpvl Depot
17
 

Airmail Service Begins - May 15, 1918

The nation's first regularly scheduled airmail service began on May 15, 1918. Planes carried mail between Washington, DC, Philadelphia and New York City. The Post Office Department worked with the U.S. Army to run the service, using army pilots and planes for the first three months of operations. In August 1918 the Post Office took complete control of the service and ran it until 1927. Routes grew to include service between New York and Chicago, then a transcontinental route between New York and San Francisco.  The Department added beacon towers and lights on aircraft and landing fields to permit night flights.


By 1927 when the Post Office had turned all of the airmail service over to private contractors, a system was in place that set the stage for the successful growth of the nation's commercial aviation system.




airmail, aviation, Jenny, JN-4H, Bustleton, Woodrow Wilson, Burleson, Praeger, Reuben Fleet, Boyle, Edgerton, Webb

Nancy Pope
18
 

Alaska Native Territories

Alaska is home to over 100,000 Indigenous residents who represent twenty distinctive cultures and languages. The map shows cities, towns and villages where most people live today, but depicts Alaska Native territories as they existed in about 1890, before the main influx of Euro-American settlers. 

Map information is courtesy of Michael Krauss, Igor Krupnik, Ives Goddard and the Alaska Native Language Center (University of Alaska Fairbanks). Map courtesy of the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center.

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
1
 

Albert Bierstadt and the Lure of the West

Easterners heard many stories about the dangers of traveling to the American west. Accounts of the great American desert as an almost impossible place to cross caused many to rethink leaving home. Albert Bierstadt and painters of the Hudson River School traveled the west and sent back their impressions of the landscape and wildlife.

Arthur Glaser
13
 

Alcohol in the 18th Century

The 18th Century was a defining moment for American Culture. Revolutions, Wars, Rebellions are mostly what people know from this time in history.  But what about the simplest of things? Alcohol was an every day beverage to soldiers, presidents, common folk, and even doctors! The 18th Century was a changing time for whiskey, rum, cider, and wine. Alcohol had its many uses in the 18th Century, whether that were medicinal, or simple pleasure. It defined and constructed social classes, with certain beverages being accessible to certain people- the wealthy, or the poor. Society placed restrictions on alcohol throughout history, but alcohol has always prevailed. People drunk alcohol every day, all day for whatever occasion.

Magdalena Villordo
12
 

Alcoholic Beverages in the 1700s

Throughout history alcohol is something that has been equally loved and hated, and there hasn't been a clear answer as to whether it is better or worse for society. This collection is showing the versatility of alcohol's uses prior to the mid-19th century. In this time period alcohol was consistently used as a medicine and I have included multiple variants of the medical purposes of these alcoholic beverages and mixtures. Also included in this collection is alcohol being used for medicinal purposes for the first president of the United States of America; George Washington. While the descriptions given for these pharmaceutical mixtures may not have been completely accurate they were obviously in some way effective or perceived to be so during this time period prior to major medical advancements that have been made today.

The secondary aspects of this collection features articles that include descriptions of different aspects of alcohol in society then and today. One of the examples is a chart from the 1790s that is condemning alcohol use and shows that even back in that time period many people understood that alcohol had many downsides and should be taken seriously, although depending on your perspective they were likely being a bit too strict about the use of it. Another article details a genetic feature known as the "Tipsy Gene" which is present in 10%-20% of the human population and drastically decreases the chances of alcoholism in the people that contain it. With such a small number of people that have a natural predisposition against alcoholism it is no surprise that is has been so prevalent in society up until today.


Brandon Salahuddin
10
 

Alexander the Great

The question “Was Alexander Great?”

#TeachingInquir

Dave Montgomery
8
 

Alexander the Great


Was Alexander the Great really a "great" ruler?
This collection contains resources that will assist you in creating a historical argument to answer that question.

Julie Cam
8
 

All Access Digital Arts Camp (plans and activities for teens with cognitive and intellectual disabilities)

SCLDA's All Access Digital Arts Program (2012-2016) provided skill-building opportunities in digital arts and communications, creative expression, and social inclusion to a spectrum of teen learners in the Washington, DC metro area. Participating youth visited Smithsonian science, history, and art museums, created digital and physical artworks based upon a tailored curriculum, engaged in social interactions online and in-person, gained digital literacy skills, and developed friendships with other teens.

Through once-per-month club outreach activities and summer intensive camps and workshops, students were exposed to communication, collaborative learning, research, and problem solving. The program served up to 20 youth per session, ages 14 through 22 with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. The youth experienced skill-building, leadership opportunities, and social integration through Smithsonian resources, socialization opportunities, and computer skills. Youth participated in 1.) One- and two-week multi-media digital arts workshops whose outcome was student-produced artworks, songs, and movies that were shared with family and friends at openings and online via a social network; and 2.) club activities--to build upon skills developed during the summer, and maintain social connections.

At the Access Summer Camp workshops, teens learn to tell their own stories through digital arts and media. They focused on a specific story to tell based upon their interests. Content for their artistic self-expressions took the form of printed digital portraits and “sonic self-portrait” digital music compositions, as well as documentary iMovies. Teens toured Smithsonian museums, visited exhibitions and interviewed curators and educators, as well as conducted internet research. Teens ate lunch together and socialized during game breaks. Volunteers worked with teens to provide individual supports and facilitate the experience. Smithsonian educators and neurotypical teen youth mentors guided Access teens to edit their content using photo, sound, and movie editing software.   The movies, portraits, and songs premiered at the Hirshhorn Museum’s ARTLAB+ for family and friends, with teens themselves providing introductory remarks for their artworks. Each teen received a certificate of completion, a digital copy of their artwork, and a framed self-portrait. An evaluation session on the final day of the workshops allowed teens to express their thoughts to the workshop organizers. 

Tracie Spinale
3
 

All Access Digital Arts Club: Activities + Plans for Neurodiverse Teens

SCLDA's All Access Digital Arts Program (2012-2016) provided skill-building opportunities in digital arts and communications, creative expression, and social inclusion to a spectrum of teen learners in the Washington, DC metro area. Participating youth visited Smithsonian science, history, and art museums, created digital and physical artworks based upon a tailored curriculum, engaged in social interactions online and in-person, gained digital literacy skills, and developed friendships with other teens. Through once-per-month club outreach activities and summer intensive camps and workshops, students were exposed to communication, collaborative learning, research, and problem solving. The program served up to 20 youth per session, ages 14 through 22 with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. The youth experienced skill building, leadership opportunities, and social integration through Smithsonian resources, socialization opportunities, and computer skills. Youth participated in 1.) One- and two-week multi-media digital arts workshops whose outcome was student-produced artworks, songs, and movies that were shared with family and friends at openings and online via a social network; and 2.) Club activities--to build upon skills developed during the summer, and maintain social connections. 

All Access Club activities were offered to alumni of the summer workshops, and were held once monthly on Saturdays during the year to build upon skills developed during the workshop, and maintain social connections. During the club, teens practiced social skills through guided activities and Smithsonian museum visits, and produced original digital and hands-on art projects at the Hirshhorn ARTLAB+. Educators led the group in a series of planned educational activities related to the day’s theme—such as “the universe” or “oceans”.  Volunteers assisted club members to use social media, tablets, cameras and laptops to facilitate the digital experience. The activities and resources promoted digital literacy skills, and can motivate families to visit museums to learn, and for teens to build self-esteem. An evaluation session on the final day allowed teens to express their thoughts to the club organizers.

Special thanks to colleague Joshua P. Taylor, Researcher, Virginia Commonwealth University


Keywords: access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, self-determination

Tracie Spinale
19
 

All That Jazz: An Introduction

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Jazz. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about jazz, read articles about Jazz, and listen to the read aloud Rent Party Jazz. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
30
 

Allensworth

Allensworth, CA. founded in 1908, represents the only all black township in California; founded, built, governed and populated by African Americans. Located in the great central valley (southern San Joaquin), it was founded to be a agricultural community and center of learning. Where, African Americans only 50 years out of slavery could become economically free. Due to lack of a dependable water supply, the untimely death of the Colonel and other factors the town's future was bleak. By 1918 the town began its demise struggling to survive. The historic portions of the town became a state historic park in the 1970's. It is formally listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a California Historic Landmark.

Steven Ptomey
22
 

Allensworth Collection

Allensworth, CA. founded in 1908, represents the only all black township in California; founded, built, governed and populated by African Americans. Located in the great central valley (southern San Joaquin), it was founded to be a agricultural community and center of learning. Where, African Americans only 50 years out of slavery could become economically free. Due to lack of a dependable water supply, the untimely death of the Colonel and other factors the town's future was bleak. By 1918 the town began its demise struggling to survive. The historic portions of the town became a state historic park in the 1970's. It is formally listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a California Historic Landmark. Here is a link to the park site, where you will find contact information for park ranger Steve Ptomey who developed this collection and manages the Allensworth State Historic Park.

Steven Ptomey
29
 

Allies in the Fields

Most people are familiar with the Farm Workers Movement but many do not know the long history of resistance in the fields.  This activity will provide an introduction into the role Asians and Asian Americans played in providing food across the United States and the pivotal role they played gaining farm worker rights. #APA2018

You will find student instructions for each section on the arrow slide dividers. Click on each for instructions.   

Throughout this experience consider the 3 Ys:

  1. Why might this snapshot of the role of Asians and Asian Americans in the fields matter to me?
  2. Why might it matter to people around (family, friends, fellow students, community)
  3. What might it matter to the world?

At the end of this activity focus on what it means to be an ally and revisit your Universe of Obligation activity.

 

Merri Weir
23
 

Alphabet Soup: Rural America and the New Deal

This lesson explores three different New Deal programs, with a specific eye towards their impact on rural America. As well, it focuses on student engagement with a variety of types of primary sources.  This lesson is designed as a self-contained class activity, which requires no supplementary teaching beyond the MoMS exhibition Crossroads. It is designed to be done in class following a visit to that exhibition, or within an after-school setting following a similar visit.

Age Levels Intermediate (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (12 to 15 years old)


Why are primary sources important?

  1. Direct engagement with artifacts and records of the past encourages deeper content exploration, active analysis, and thoughtful response.
  2. Analysis of primary sources helps develop critical thinking skills by examining meaning, context, bias, purpose, point of view, etc.
  3.  Primary source analysis fosters learner-led inquiry as students construct knowledge by interacting with a variety of sources that represent different accounts of the past.
  4. Students realize that history exists through interpretation that reflects the view points and biases of those doing the interpreting. 

This lesson aims to:

  • Introduce students to New Deal programs that affected rural life and agriculture during the Great Depression.
  • Encourage discussion of the experience of those programs in the context of the Museum on Main Street (MoMS) exhibition Crossroads.
  • Help students practice using different types of sources as research material.

Students should be able to:

  • Identify different types of sources as primary and secondary sources, as well as differentiate between objective and subjective sources.
  • Interrogate textual, video, and visual sources to build a picture of how different programs affected ordinary people.
  • Be able to translate their research into a presentation, and teach it to other students.

See notes for lesson plan instructions.

SITES Museum on Main Street
21
 

Alphabet Soup: Rural America and the New Deal

This lesson explores three different New Deal programs, with a specific eye towards their impact on rural America. As well, it focuses on student engagement with a variety of types of primary sources.  This lesson is designed as a self-contained class activity, which requires no supplementary teaching beyond the MoMS exhibition Crossroads. It is designed to be done in class following a visit to that exhibition, or within an after-school setting following a similar visit.

Age Levels Intermediate (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (12 to 15 years old)


Why are primary sources important?

  1. Direct engagement with artifacts and records of the past encourages deeper content exploration, active analysis, and thoughtful response.
  2. Analysis of primary sources helps develop critical thinking skills by examining meaning, context, bias, purpose, point of view, etc.
  3.  Primary source analysis fosters learner-led inquiry as students construct knowledge by interacting with a variety of sources that represent different accounts of the past.
  4. Students realize that history exists through interpretation that reflects the view points and biases of those doing the interpreting. 

This lesson aims to:

  • Introduce students to New Deal programs that affected rural life and agriculture during the Great Depression.
  • Encourage discussion of the experience of those programs in the context of the Museum on Main Street (MoMS) exhibition Crossroads.
  • Help students practice using different types of sources as research material.

Students should be able to:

  • Identify different types of sources as primary and secondary sources, as well as differentiate between objective and subjective sources.
  • Interrogate textual, video, and visual sources to build a picture of how different programs affected ordinary people.
  • Be able to translate their research into a presentation, and teach it to other students.

See notes for lesson plan instructions.

Mary Byrne
21
 

Althea Gibson Tennis Collection

Resources related to tennis player and International Tennis Hall of Famer Althea Gibson.

Althea Gibson, tennis, Wimbledon, racquet, racket

Nicole Markham
11
 

Amazing Ancient Africa

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Ancient Africa. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can learn about Ancient Egypt and Ancient Mali. There are artifacts to explore and videos to watch. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
53
 

Amelia Bloomer

What is the legacy of Amelia Bloomer?

This collection includes documents, images, and objects to help students determine what is the true legacy of Amelia Bloomer.

Kristina Kimmick
10
 

Amelia Earhart: America's Aviatrix

Students will use the elements of portrayal to analyze portraits of Amelia Earhart and listen to a speech to learn biographic details.

#NPGteach

Christy Ting
10
121-144 of 2,011 Collections